March 1, 1962

PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF U.S. REPRESENTATIVES

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure the house will permit me to make reference to the presence in the gallery today of distinguished representatives of the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States who are here for the purpose of attending the meeting of the Canadian-United States interparliamentary group. I think, for the purpose of the record, I should place on Hansard the names of the various representatives who are here.

The Senate is represented by Hon. George D. Aiken, chairman; Hon. Roman L. Hruska; Hon. Pat McNamara; Hon. Mrs. Maurine B. Neuberger and Hon. Claiborne Pell. The representatives of the House of Representatives are Hon. Cornelius E. Gallagher, chairman; Hon. Laurence Curtis; Hon. William S. Broomfield; Hon. William T. Murphy; Hon. Robert N. Giaimo; Hon. John M. Slack, Jr.; Hon. Harold T. Johnson; Hon. Daniel K. Inouye; Hon. Stanley R. Tupper who, by the way, is a descendant of Sir Charles Tupper, one time prime minister of Canada; Hon. Howard W. Robison and Hon. James Harvey.

I extend on behalf of this house, and I am sure the members of the opposition will join with me, the warmest congratulations and good wishes. Indeed, the hon. member for Laurier (Mr. Chevrier) will recall that in the month of January, 1943, for the first time in our history members of the congress of the United States met members of the Canadian parliament and members of the various parliaments of the commonwealth here in Ottawa to discuss those matters that particularly affected the welfare of our respective nations. He knows the close relationship that prevails and which we all hope will continue in the years ahead between the United States and Canada and the other members of the commonwealth.

Then in 1958 this organization had its beginning. As I look back on that beginning I think generally speaking it will be recognized that this interparliamentary group embarked on an uncharted course which held out almost 26207-1-87i

as much prospect of adventure-some predicted misadventure-as did that trip into space the other day by Colonel Glenn. I believe that this interparliamentary group, and what it means in co-operation between our nations, is as important to all of us as any interplanetary activities. In its common dedication to the things in which we believe we are united in freedom.

These gatherings which alternate between Washington and Ottawa provide channels of communication that otherwise would not be available between the lawmakers of our two nations. These meetings permit a review of the ever widening range of our common interests, and these discussions assist us in our consideration of the solution of these problems.

One could say a great deal, but I think the message I am trying to convey could be summarized in a few words. While from time to time we have our differences, the things that unite us, being of the spirit, are becoming stronger with the passing years. What we need is infinite patience, with a full realization of the problems of each other, to the end that in mutual understanding, forbearance and patience we shall strengthen the bonds between our nations and thereby show the rest of the world what can be achieved when independent peoples, each maintaining their own sovereignty, are prepared to join together in peace for the welfare of their respective countries and, indeed, the welfare of all mankind.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF U.S. REPRESENTATIVES
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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Laurier):

I would like to echo the words of the Prime Minister in welcoming the members of the Canada-United States interparliamentary committee to Canada. This has been an excellent committee, which has done work of a practical and permanent nature. There are unquestionably important problems to solve between our country and the United States, problems which may cause difficulty and friction; but when we look at what has transpired in the past, and particularly at what took place during the war years between our two countries-I have in mind now our balance of trade payments, the construction of the Alaska highway and the building of the northwest passage-I can come to no other conclusion but that when men of good will and understanding want to solve problems, they can do it. I can remember, too, in those years when there was some difficulty about receiving into the Yukon certain members of the United States army

1370 HOUSE OF

U.S. Representatives in Gallery because of war regulations. Those members were admitted into Canada by means of an order in council which exempted them under the title of "distinguished citizens".

I should like to mention the St. Lawrence seaway as another example, sir, of the manner in which our problems have been solved, because I had some little experience with that project. There we had difficulties of construction, of costs and of plans and specifications in the international section of the river. I can pay no greater tribute to those from the United States who sat on the opposite side of the table from us than refer to the manner in which they helped, because of their understanding and co-operation, to solve many difficult problems.

I also commend you, sir, for the manner in which you have presided over the deliberations of the Canadian section of this committee and I wish you and those who are associated with you well in your deliberations.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, I would be remiss if I did not say a few words in my mother tongue to show the Canada-United States delegation that the house is bilingual.

Naturally, I address myself to all members of the committee but especially to Senator Aiken of Vermont, whose state is right next to the province of Quebec with which it has been maintaining good relations for many years.

I ask him to pay our respects to our Franco-American compatriots who live not only in Vermont but in all the states of New England.

To him and to all his distinguished colleagues, I offer our best wishes.

(Text):

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF U.S. REPRESENTATIVES
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NDP

Frank Howard

New Democratic Party

Mr. Frank Howard (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, as one of the members participating in the particular set of meetings that are going on, speaking on behalf of the members of the New Democratic party may I associate this group wholeheartedly with the remarks of welcome by the Prime Minister and the hon. member for Laurier to the distinguished senators and members of the House of Representatives of the United States who are with us for the sixth meeting of the Canada-United States interparliamentary group.

1 know that our members are unanimously of the opinion that it is impossible to find words to express our appreciation for the hospitality that has been shown to us on previous occasions. The ideas expressed by representatives of the United States are, from our point of view, excellent and the discussions are free and open. Frequently

their ideas have merit. Sometimes we differ with them and I am sure that sometimes they differ with our points of view, but I think agreements which are treasured the most are those agreements which are reached after the expression of differences of opinion.

This interparliamentary group affords an opportunity for the free, frank and fruitful discussion of problems of mutual concern to our respective countries. We trust that this visit will not only increase mutual understanding, but will be enjoyed and remembered by our visitors from the nation to the south. We know that our goal and objectives are the same, namely peace, prosperity and happiness not only for ourselves but for all nations of the world. We are sure these discussions will tend to move us more quickly toward these goals.

Topic:   PRESENCE IN GALLERY OF U.S. REPRESENTATIVES
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RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES


Third report of committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines-Mr. Howe.


NATIONAL DEFENCE

NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Essex East):

I should like to ask the Prime Minister if he has any comment to make on the statement made this morning by Secretary of State Dean Rusk that the United States is willing to work out arrangements for joint control of nuclear weapons in Canada in a manner fully consistent with national sovereignty.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

I shall have to give study to the remarks of Secretary Rusk, and when I have done so I will make a report to this house.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
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LIB

Paul Theodore Hellyer

Liberal

Hon. Paul Hellyer (Trinity):

A supplementary question. Mr. Rusk indicated that the United States had discussed such arrangements with other governments, but he did not mention any discussions with the Canadian government. Could the Prime Minister say whether discussions were held on this subject between the two governments and, if so, why they have been discontinued?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

The hon. gentleman was here yesterday, and I am sure he had a complete answer to everything he is asking today.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
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LIB

Paul Theodore Hellyer

Liberal

Mr. Hellyer:

Not at all. That is why I should like to press the question again.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS-STATEMENT BY U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE
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ARCTIC ISLANDS

REPORTED SELECTION OF LANDING STRIPS BY U.S.


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Laurier):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to address a question to the Minister of National Defence. Will the minister comment on a Canadian Press statement emanating from Ottawa yesterday to the effect that the United States has picked out some 50 emergency landing strips in the Canadian Arctic islands for military and civilian planes? Is the statement factual, and are there any conditions governing the use of these fields?

Topic:   ARCTIC ISLANDS
Subtopic:   REPORTED SELECTION OF LANDING STRIPS BY U.S.
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PC

Douglas Scott Harkness (Minister of National Defence)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. D. S. Harkness (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, I saw the article referred to but have no official information in that regard. I asked for a report from my officials, but have not yet received one.

Topic:   ARCTIC ISLANDS
Subtopic:   REPORTED SELECTION OF LANDING STRIPS BY U.S.
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March 1, 1962