June 2, 1961

PC

Michael Starr (Minister of Labour)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Michael Starr (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, up until now we have been paying subventions on the coal sold in that area by the mines, and my statement related to those subventions.

Apparently the reporter did not understand it that way; apparently the people who were there did not understand it that way. There is nothing at all about subventions in the words attributed to the minister. He said, "If they will keep the mines open, we will pay the bills". The bills are not subventions; the bills are the cost of keeping the mines open. Then I asked this question:

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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

Will the minister comment on a statement which appears in the Halifax Chronicle-Herald. to the effect that labour minister Starr said: The big problem is to convince the company to keep the mines open. We will pay the bill.

We all remember what happened at that point. The Minister of Finance turned around and glared at the Minister of Labour, and here is what the Minister of Labour then said:

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PC

Michael Starr (Minister of Labour)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Starr:

Mr. Speaker, the keeping of the mines open is, of course, a decision of management. We would like to see the mines kept open if possible. We have paid subvention bills and are prepared to continue to pay them if they keep those mines open.

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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

May I ask a further supplementary question. Does the minister mean that the government is prepared to pay the cost of keeping the mines open?

At that point the Speaker intervened and there was no answer given to that question, which was the original question. This, of course, is typical of the way in which this government treat these problems. They give an assurance to the public and get the delegation away out of Ottawa and back to Cape Breton, and then they repudiate it in that indirect fashion here in the house. That is really what happened in this case. Those people went away thinking that if Dosco kept the mines open, the government would pay the bill.

I do not think there is any doubt that the Dominion Coal Company would have kept those mines open if the government had been prepared to pay the bill.

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?

Some hon. Members:

No.

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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

I am not saying that should have been done, but I am saying that is what they were told. We were told something else too, after the Minister of Finance had glared at the Minister of Labour.

The plain fact of the matter is that instead of making up their minds months ago that they would either let these mines close or that they would pay the cost of keeping them open, this government tried to keep fooling the people and fooling the people, and then finally they let two of the three mines close.

I say it is a good thing they did not let the other one close. But when you compare that with what was promised by the Prime Minister, not in the first election but later on between the elections-no; this was in fact before the first election; this was on Thursday, May 21, 1957. This is from the Cape Breton Post and these are the words of the present Prime Minister:

National leader of the Progressive Conservative party, John Diefenbaker, Wednesday night, told an overflow political rally at the Riverview high school here that a national fuel policy is high on the program of the national policy.

Then later on there is the following paragraph:

Implementation of a national fuel policy and its particular relation to Nova Scotia was discussed by Mr. Diefenbaker who stressed the important need of aid to the coal mines of the province.

That was in 1957, and we are still waiting for that policy. Indeed, the minister told us yesterday-I had better use his exact words -that you could not have such a policy. After four years of promises and evasion the minister says:

In presenting these estimates to this committee,

I regret to report that the coal situation in Canada in the past year has grown more and more difficult as the competition from other fuels has intensified.

Well, that is true; everybody recognizes that is true:

It is becoming clear that the long established policy of providing assistance in the amount necessary to enable Canadian coal to meet the competition of imported coal in the markets of central Canada is no longer sufficient.

That is what we have been saying since 1958. That is one of the reasons why we had this thermal power policy:

The chief competition in these central markets and also in the home markets is no longer imported coal but other fuels.

It is open to question whether under the present rapidly changing competitive conditions a sound basis can be found for a long range basic policy.

In other words, they just throw up their hands and confess that they cannot have any policy. Maybe they cannot have any policy for coal, but surely they could have a policy to provide work for the coal miners who are thrown out of work. That is what they should be doing, and that is what they should have been doing for the last year. That is the real complaint I have been seeking to make all through.

I should like to quote the words of an editorial in yesterday's Halifax Chronicle-Herald, because I think this editorial states the situation clearly. It says in better fashion and more succinctly than I can, improvising here in the committee, exactly what the problem is. The editorial is called:

Cape Breton's Need.

It says:

The plan for meeting the latest Cape Breton coal crisis that has emerged from long and painful consultations between the federal government and Dosco is one of mixed blessings whose full effects will depend upon the type of follow-up action undertaken by Ottawa over the next few months.

That is what we want the minister to tell us. What is the follow-up going to be? We want to know the precise details of that. We do not want to be told, "After my estimates are over we will get up on the orders of the day and state something and you will not be able to debate it". We want to be told now.

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PC

Robert Hardy Small

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Small:

Something like you did; is that what you mean?

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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

Yes, we always did, because we were capable of making up our minds, announcing our policy and allowing it to be debated. That is why Canada was growing from 1945 to 1957 and that is why it has stopped growing today. I thank the hon. member for reminding me.

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PC

Robert Hardy Small

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Small:

You had no mind to make up. C. D. Howe made it up for you.

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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

This editorial continues:

The final closing of the 99-year-old Caledonia mine at Glace Bay and of the north side's Florence and the 12-month reprieve given to New Waterford's No. 16, the best producer in quantity and quality of the three, follows the general pattern of the past in the contraction of the industry- a pattern for which there is, unfortunately, little better alternative in the face of today's stiffening competition in the fuel markets.

The hopes that had been held for a continuation of all three pits were flimsily-based from the start. Caledonia and Florence are classed as uneconomical, and to keep them going, even with the extension of the federal-provincial offer of a dollar per ton production subsidy, would have brought the whole Dominion Coal Company enterprise closer to bankruptcy.

Even with No. 16 kept open for another year through this special type of aid, it will be necessary to resort to short-time work weeks in all but the better metallurgical collieries such as No. 26

Supply*-Mines and Technical Surveys and McBean. The company says it cannot find consumers for much more than four million tons a year without considerably expanded governmental assistance. The remaining mines, including No. 16, to be left in operation after Florence's abandonment this summer have a combined output capacity of almost 4,700,000 tons.

More than 1,200 miners are to be affected by this year's closings. Some will be transferred to other pits and some will be retired on pension. But the net addition to the ranks of the jobless still will be close to. if not more than, 800.

Eight hundred men, practically all of them with families, and most of them with large families:

And when the extra lease on life for No. 16, which contributes almost half of the general income for the town of New Waterford, runs out in August of 1962 another thousand men will be idled. The $1,500,000 which Ottawa is to provide for emergency employment on the island (in addition to the outlay in an extra year's production subsidies) will look after only a few hundred of these dislocated men and that apparently for a limited period in most cases.

Something more-

I draw your attention to these words.

-is obviously needed to avoid a further drastic economic setback for Cape Breton.

Mines minister Comtois has said this long term regional problem will get special federal attention.

We want to know what that attention is.

This consideration must go beyond merely more ad hoc palliatives and get into the realm of fiscal incentives to draw new industries into the region. Similarly, the possibility of Nova Scotia replacing the U.S. as supplier of the half million tons of bituminous consumed annually by Ottawa's own Polymer Corporation synthetic rubber plant at Sarnia should be further explored. Obtaining this market would be just about enough to rescue No. 16 from abandonment next year. Or at least to prevent the closing of further mines.

There is a real danger that, unless we get a good combination of ferreting out new coal markets within Canada and a bold, comprehensive government spearheaded program for revitalizing the entire industrial base of Cape Breton there will be a continuing, and likely accelerating, drift from bad to worse in its economy.

"We cannot cut this island off," royal commissioner Ivan Band has said so rightly. "Canada, acting with Nova Scotia, must provide conditions to enable it to regain confidence and affirm its will to a new vitality".

And that goes for Springhill, Westville, Stellarton and the other mining communities of the mainland as well.

This, sir, is the problem with which we should be concerned, not what happened in 1957, 1947, 1937 or even 1867. The problem is here and now. The minister should get up now and tell us precisely what he is going to do to provide jobs for these men. He should tell us also whether or not he has spoken to his colleague, the Minister of Public Works, about the houses which many of these miners have bought, and for which they are not going to be able to pay. These houses are mortgaged to Central Mortage and Housing Corporation. This is another problem that

Supply-Mines and Technical Surveys has to be considered. However, the big problem is to get jobs for these men and stop the decay in Cape Breton.

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PC

Richard Russell Southam

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Soulham:

Mr. Chairman, before the debate is concluded on this item of the dominion coal board, I should like to say a few words about the coal industry in the riding of Moose Mountain. I think, unknown to quite a few members, we have a very important coal industry in that part of Saskatchewan. It too has suffered from some of the problems of this industry which have been related at this time. It is a coincidence that just about

10 or 12 years ago an oil company surveying this area discovered large deposits of oil and, as a result of the development of that oil gas has been produced, too. It is interesting to note that out of about 4,300 producing wells in Saskatchewan, there are over 3,000 in that riding.

This development has provided our coal industry with very strong competition. I should like to give the committee, for a minute or two, a few facts concerning the lignite coal industry. I am not going to take up very much of the committee's time. Lignite coal is strip mined near Bienfait and Estevan, Saskatchewan. A fairly constant production of slightly over 2,200,000 tons has been maintained since 1950. The principal markets are for industrial users in the Winnipeg area. More than 70 per cent of the coal sold in the Winnipeg area is lignite. Other markets are in the Regina and Brandon areas, and certain pulp and paper plants at Kenora, Dryden and Fort Frances in Ontario.

Lignite coal possesses a substantial market advantage as a low cost fuel located near its principal markets; only 280 miles from Winnipeg and 155 miles from Brandon. There has also been a new market developed just recently as a result of the construction of a $40 million power plant near Estevan. This steam turbo generating plant uses large amounts of coal for the production of electricity.

In the post-war years the domestic house heating market has been pre-empted by fuel

011 and latterly, to a large extent, by natural gas. The industry, by vigorous salesmanship which included assistance to industrial users in the installation of proper heating plants, was able to develop an industrial market more than replacing the lost domestic market. Concurrently, the companies have invested more than $5 million in new equipment since the war. As a result of mechanization and technological improvements, the industry has been able to absorb successive wage increases and has only raised the mine price of coal by 10 cents per ton since 1948. The present mine price averages $2 per ton.

The lignite industry by its vigorous salesmanship and technological initiative has been able to maintain its position, notwithstanding the competition of premium fuels in the postwar years. Its existence has been threatened by drastic increases in transportation expenses which it is powerless to control, and by this latter competition that I have just mentioned.

I have had representations from one of the directors of one of the leading coal companies in that area. We have, by the way, the following companies in that area, the Great West Coal Company; Western Dominion Coal Company; Manitoba and Saskatchewan Coal Company; Northwest Coal Company, and several other smaller ones. I have here a representation from which I am going to read a short extract, prepared by Mr. W. W. Lynd, Q.C., on behalf of Mr. J. M. Brodie, managing director of Great West Coal Company. He is referring to the Rand commission report, and he says:

The report is most disappointing to the coal industry and if the recommendations that are made in the report are implemented by legislation, it will ring the death knell of the coal industry in Saskatchewan and Alberta at least, and I am not familiar enough with the coal industry of Nova Scotia to say what effect it will have there.

Instead of making recommendations that will be of benefit to the coal industry, the recommendations will very substantially take away from the industry what little help it has been getting in the past. The commissioner proposes to do away with subventions, which are simply the payment by the government of part of the freight rates on coal shipped into certain areas in the country to enable it to compete mostly with importations from the United States. The commissioner proposes these subventions be abandoned and in place thereof that a subsidy of 30 cents a ton be given to the companies which would be of far less benefit than the subventions.

Right at the moment Western Dominion coal mines sells about 400,000 tons to a paper industry in Ontario and the competition is very keen and it has only been by cutting the price to the minimum and by the help of subventions that this market has been held and if the subventions are taken away, it means a loss of 400,000 tons to this one mine.

Now, Mr. Chairman, I should like to ask the Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys if he would give very serious consideration to these representations from the Great West Coal Company which affect this industry.

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PC

Lawrence Elliott Kindt

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Kindi:

During the past day and a half, Mr. Chairman, we have heard a lot of discussion on the subject of coal. About 95 per cent of this discussion has been related to Cape Breton and eastern Canada. I rise now to say a few words about western Canada and the particular problems associated with the coal industry in the Crowsnest pass area.

For the purpose of orienting hon. members, let me say that there is about 7 per cent of the world's supply of coal in western

Canada. A large proportion of that coal is located in the Macleod constituency. We have the bituminous type, the lignite type, the metallurgical type, and so on. We are shipping about 650,000 tons to Japan yearly. According to reports from the Japanese who are, I might say, very critical and who have the world to pick from, our coal from the Crowsnest pass is tops for steel production. They say it is superior in terms of B.T.U.'s, ash content and many other qualities to any coal coming from other parts of the world. Hence when I rise this afternoon to speak about the coal industry of the west, I am not speaking because I have nothing to talk about; I am speaking because there is a problem there. It is one which is as acute as that in Nova Scotia. I am also speaking to you because the Crowsnest pass of western Canada may be called the Cape Breton of western Canada. I do not mean to say that we have not been doing anything about the matter. That is far from being the situation. This government has initiated a policy of shipping coal to Japan. As I said before, some 650,000 tons are under contract for shipment to Japan this year.

Let me turn to some of the statements made by the hon. member for Bonavista-Twillingate concerning his Liberal policies with respect to coal. What the hon. member said may apply to other areas; I have no information in that regard. However, I can speak from the bottom of my heart and with full knowledge about what has taken place in the Crowsnest pass. As the minister has already said, at one time 3,500,000 tons of coal were produced in the Crowsnest pass for the use of railroad locomotives. That production has now dwindled down, if I heard this figure correctly, to some 200 tons; in other words there is no further market. These railroads are all dieselized. It stands to reason that, with the shrinkage of the output down to next to nothing with the exception of a small quantity for domestic use there has been a dwindling of the markets for coal mined in the Crowsnest pass to practically nothing.

These miners who have spent their lives digging coal, have built their homes in the Crowsnest pass, have spent their lives in that area and have reared their families there are left high and dry, stranded and without anything to do. The former government allowed mines to close one after another in that area. The Hillcrest mine closed as did the mines in British Columbia, some of them at Fernie. Mine after mine closed down until only three remained open when this government came into office. If the policy of the Liberals was such as to keep mines operating and to give miners employment, why did they

2, 1961 5779

Supply-Mines and Technical Surveys not do something about the situation? They did nothing. They left it to this government. May I say it was myself who recommended to the present government that the Japanese market should be opened for western Canadian coal. That recommendation was heeded and the Japanese market opened by subsidy for our coal. As I have already said, some

650,000 tons are being shipped annually to Japan. That amount of 650,000 tons is doing a tremendous job in helping the miners of the Crowsnest pass. However, there are always problems that one has to contend with.

One of the problems we have encountered within the past three or four months is the failure of the West Canadian Collieries at Blairmore to take any further Japanese coal orders. The coal mining operators in British Columbia have gone back in and have taken orders from Japan for some 300,000 tons of coal. At Michel everything is fine, times are good, the mines are operating and the people are happy. They are all employed in that particular area. Coming back down to Coleman, we find that they have taken coal orders for 170,000 tons from Japan. They too, are now in a very fortunate position and are operating in such a manner as to give maximum employment. However, at Blairmore and Bellevue it was found by the company operating there that it was unable to cover the costs and allow a sufficient profit. In addition, other factors came into the picture and made it such that no additional orders were taken this year from Japan.

By way of further explanation for those who are less familiar with the subject, allow me to say that operators in the coal mining business, like operators in any other field, have different costs of production. The company in British Columbia operates at a certain level, the one at Coleman operates at another level, and West Canadian Collieries at Blairmore operates at still another level. If employment was to be given in each of those areas, the dominion coal board had to give consideration to the costs of production in each of those three mines and the coal subsidy was set accordingly. If they had taken an average of the cost of each of those three mines, the high cost operator would have been eliminated, and there would have been no employment and no orders taken from Japan by one mine at the time when the subsidy was first initiated. But this was not done. The subsidy was set high enough to cover the cost of the highest cost operator.

However, that operator has found that it can no longer take coal orders from Japan and make a profit on the transactions. As a consequence some 350 miners have been unemployed since December in the Blairmore and Bellevue areas. Whenever there is that

5780 HOUSE OF

Supply-Mines and Technical Surveys number of miners thrown out of work, a difficult situation arises. May I say that, as far as I am able to determine, those mines are closed and there is no prospect of their reopening in the foreseeable future. I have talked with one of the officials of that mine, and as a matter of fact he told me that if he was a worker for that company he would take any job that came along. Therefore, when I met all of the unemployed at Blair-more back during the first week of April I was careful to point this fact out to them. To help correct this situation I went to the president of some 10 companies that are now building that $20 million plant west of Coleman and also companies laying pipe lines for the export of gas, and I asked them to give priority to the miners who have been thrown out of work through the closing of the mines at Blairmore and Bellevue. I received very fine co-operation but I find also that most of those companies which are building the pipe line bring their employees in from the outside and that the local people are not getting the jobs. I should like to read part of a letter I have received from the town of Blairmore with regard to this matter.

The council also wish to draw to your attention the fact that very few of the local unemployed persons are being hired by the pipe line construction company or the gas plant construction company and it was understood by the council that the hiring of local labour would be one of the first considerations of these companies, but this does not seem to be the case. Could this matter be brought to the attention of these companies and placement authorities through your office?

1 have brought this matter to the attention of the Department of Labour. I have asked that job requirements in the Pincher Creek area be referred to the Blairmore office so that the unemployed in the Crowsnest pass will receive priority with respect to the jobs that become available.

South of Pincher Creek a $20 million Shell plant will be constructed this summer and a railway line 10.8 miles long is to be built leading to the plant. Then there is the $20 million British American Oil Company plant. I might add for the information of hon. members that from this very area south of Pincher Creek comes a large percentage of the gas that warms the homes of Ontario. The new petrochemical industries are constructing plants in that area for the purpose of separating the gas, separating sour gas, separating methane, which will be transported through pipes to eastern Canada and also exported to the United States. I hope that the Minister of Labour will give every possible consideration to the question of employment in the Crowsnest pass area.

I want to say a few more words about the coal industry. Yesterday the minister said

that the shipment of coal to Japan was an experiment. To be sure, we all recognize that it is an experiment in that $4.50 per ton by way of subsidy is being paid to move the coal. As he told us, work is being undertaken to reduce the mining costs, transportation charges and the loading charges at the bulk loading facilities at Vancouver. All of these attempts to lower the subsidy are very commendable. If it were possible to decrease it to $2.50 a ton I would have every confidence that it would put the coal industry in the Crowsnest pass area on a sound and economic basis in relation to the Japanese market. That is what we want. That is the objective toward which we should be working. These are the points that the coal board and other people who are studying these matters should bring to the attention of all concerned and all should work towards making it economically possible to ship coal to supply the Japanese market.

I know that at the end of April there were some 750 to 800 people still unemployed in the Crowsnest pass area. That is why I am so concerned that, with respect to jobs available in my constituency, the first chance should be given to the people of the Crowsnest pass area. There were three mines operating in that area but the number has now dwindled to two. I hope above all that the minister in his wisdom and the coal board in its wisdom will look with favour upon the continuation of the present subsidy in order to maintain the movement of coal to the Japanese market.

I should like to say a word or two about the Rand report. We in western Canada want nothing whatever to do with that report. I make that flat statement. There is not a thing in it that is of any value to us. So far as we are concerned, you can take it and throw it in the nearest garbage can and you would be applauded by us for doing so. Whoever wrote the report knew nothing of the coal industry in the west and I say without fear of contradiction that he certainly knew nothing about the coal industry in my area.

So far as the dominion coal board is concerned, I understand that the board is going through a period of reorganization and that certain changes will be made because of the retirement of some of the officials. At this time I should like to join the minister in complimenting the late Mr. Uren, the former chairman of the board, and also Mr. O'Brian who has spent much of his fife as a civil servant in the service of the board. These two fine gentlemen are to be highly complimented and they deserve the thanks and appreciation of all members of the house

regardless of political affiliation. In the reorganization of the board and replacement of officials, I hope the time has come when western Canada will have at least 50 per cent of the representation. The chairman of the board should be from western Canada. He has always been from the east and the reason for that is that more vocal people, like the hon. member for Bonavista-Twillin-gate, are always talking about the eastern situation. There are only myself, the hon. member for Bow River and one or two others that stand up and speak for the coal industry of western Canada. Yet we have far more coal in the west than there is in the east.

I am saying that the coal in the west is going to be developed some day and we want proper guidance in its development. We want proper consideration by the coal board given in respect of that guidance. When consideration is being given to the development of our natural resources-coal being one of the most important sources of energy-we want proper consideration given to western Canada. Let there be no mistake about it. As the member for MacLeod I shall not remain silent if that consideration is not given to western Canada.

Finally, I wish to compliment the minister and the government. In my view the government has done more for the coal industry in the three years it has been in office than the former government did during all the time it was in office. So far as the west is concerned, and my remarks in this regard apply only to the west, the Liberals did nothing in the Crowsnest pass area. As I have already indicated, they simply let one mine after another close and left the miners to sink or swim. As a result there is now a cankerous problem in that area so far as labour is concerned. I have made certain suggestions to the department and I know that every effort will be made to try to solve the problem. I want to thank the minister and the government for the efforts they are making, and if there is any way I can assist to improve the position of the coal industry of the west I shall always be ready to do so.

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CCF

Herbert Wilfred Herridge

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Herridge:

Would the hon. member permit a question?

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PC

Lawrence Elliott Kindt

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Kindt:

Yes, indeed.

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CCF

Herbert Wilfred Herridge

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Herridge:

If I heard the hon. member correctly, he referred to the late Mr. Uren. Are we to understand that Mr. Uren has passed away?

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PC

Lawrence Elliott Kindt

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Kindt:

I understand he has retired.

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CCF

Herbert Wilfred Herridge

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Herridge:

You used the phrase "the late Mr. Uren".

90205-6-365

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Supply-Mines and Technical Surveys

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PC

Lawrence Elliott Kindt

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Kindt:

I am sorry. I intended to say the former chairman of the coal board.

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PC

Donald MacInnis

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Maclnnis:

There are two sides to every coin. Last evening I presented one side and I should like, this afternoon, to give the committee a picture of the other side. Before doing so I wish to refer to some of the observations made by members of the opposition. I do not for a moment think that anything I have to say this afternoon can be very beneficial to the miners of Cape Breton, and certainly not to the colliery where I used to work, which was closed on Wednesday. However, it surprised me that such a great interest has been aroused among opposition members, who in the past, when representations have been made here by delegations and committees coming from the areas concerned, have, whether Liberal or C.C.F., never shown any concern about these meetings and never attended any of these conferences. Indeed, I gave the hon. member for Gloucester, the last time I spoke in this chamber, what amounted to a formal invitation to attend one of these meetings, an invitation which he saw fit to by-pass. In spite of this lack of concern in the past, the members on the other side have suddenly developed a great interest in the plight of the coal miners.

Yesterday the hon. member for Timiskaming found it necessary to make representations on behalf of Elliot Lake. I am sure he must have ingratiated himself with the Leader of the Opposition by doing so although not intentionally, because that hon. gentleman, who represents the town in question, has failed to say one word on the subject during this discussion on the estimates of the Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys. The hon. member for Timiskaming said he did not think political football should be played in the situation which now exists with respect to mines. I have long ago given up any idea that I could go on a public platform anywhere without becoming involved in politics on this question. The hon. member's reference to this subject yesterday confirmed me in his belief. Indeed, I am convinced that this is the case as far as the opposition is concerned. They are making a political football out of this issue. This was clearly illustrated by the question which his own leader addressed to the Minister of National Revenue on March 21 last with regard to a meeting being held with miners' representatives from Cape Breton. The true nature and purpose of the question was revealed when the minister had to inform the hon. gentleman that the meeting with which he was apparently so concerned had taken place the day before the question was asked. That shows where

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Supply-Mines and Technical Surveys the hon. gentleman's interest lay; he did not even know that the meeting had already taken place.

It is usual when a member refers to another member who is absent from the chamber to say he is sorry that is the case. But I am going to reverse that procedure and say I am glad the hon. member for Essex East is not in his place today, because I think that with regard to this coal board item the committee has been getting on splendidly without him. Up until a short while ago the hon. member for Essex East was trying to set himself up as a champion of the coal miner. What put a stop to these activities I do not know, unless it was a front page press release which appeared in the Montreal Gazette a few weeks ago showing that the hon. member was much interested in the stock of the Quebec Natural Gas Company. I suppose he himself realized he could no longer serve two masters.

Topic:   NORTHERN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   INDIA-STATEMENT OF CONSORTIUM ON AID COMMITMENTS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   NORTHERN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   INDIA-STATEMENT OF CONSORTIUM ON AID COMMITMENTS
Permalink

June 2, 1961