March 2, 1960

PRIVILEGE

REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1

LIB

Augustin Brassard

Liberal

Mr. Augustin Brassard (Lapointe):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege.

Last evening while I was dealing with the winter works program, I was interrupted, as usual, by the hon. member for Roberval (Mr. Tremblay). At one point, I did not quite catch what he had said, but this morning, on going over Hansard, I find on page 1690 (page 4 of the appendix) that he said this:

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
Permalink
PC

Jean-Noël Tremblay

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Tremblay:

Yes. Is it for that reason that the hon. member is trying to protect certain very dubious individuals in my constituency? Criminals?

Mr. Speaker, I do not think I have ever protected any criminals, and have no intention of doing so either now or in the future. That remark on the part of the hon. member is a reflection on my good name as member of the House of Commons and I would ask that you kindly request the member for Roberval to withdraw those words.

(Text):

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
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PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

The hon. member raises today a question of privilege arising out of something that was said last night. Normally that would not be in order. Questions of privilege which arise in this way in the course of debate must be taken up at once. After they have become a matter of record it is rather late. The hon. member indicates that he did not hear what was said at the time. I am not sure whether there is any real reflection on the hon. member involved in what was said, but as he has complained I will give the hon. member for Roberval (Mr. Tremblay) an opportunity to comment on it.

(Translation):

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
Permalink
PC

Jean-Noël Tremblay

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. N. Tremblay (Roberval):

Mr. Speaker, last evening, when the member for Lapointe (Mr. Brassard) was making a speech on the employment situation in Canada, he took the liberty of referring to my riding, to which I obviously cannot object. However, I pointed out to him-and my remark took the form of a question-"Is it for that reason that the hon. member is trying to protect certain very dubious individuals in my constituency?"

That is exactly what I said. I said it because I had reasons for doing so, and I undertake to state in the house, when we take up the items of the Department of Justice, what I had in mind.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
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LIB

Augustin Brassard

Liberal

Mr. Brassard (Lapointe):

Mr. Speaker, I maintain that the member has cast reflections upon my personal good name and I demand that he withdraw his words.

(Text):

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
Permalink
PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I heard the hon. member in the first instance. I doubt that there is sufficient cause for complaint in what he said. I will not direct the hon. member to do something which he does not wish to do voluntarily.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
Permalink
LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Laurier):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to rise on this question of privilege and point out to you that yesterday I had to withdraw a statement made under exactly the same circumstances when, in asking a question of the Chairman, I insinuated that he was using two different weights and measures as between the opposition and the government. When the Chairman asked me what I meant by that I afterwards told him that the insinuation was not one on the Chair, and I withdrew it. What the hon. member for Roberval has done now is to say that he asked a question as to whether or not the hon. member for Lapointe was protecting criminals. If that is not by insinuation a reflection on the hon. member's reputation, then I do not know what it is, sir. I think it is a point which is well taken, and I wish Your Honour would take some action on it. Perhaps Your Honour might wish to take it under consideration.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
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PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

I will give some thought to the remark which is complained of, particularly since there is no motion or other matter on which we can proceed now.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARKS IN DEBATE ON MARCH 1
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UNITED NATIONS

WORLD REFUGEE YEAR

PC

Howard Charles Green (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Howard C. Green (Secretary of Slate for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to make an announcement about the participation of the government in world refugee year through the admission of tuberculous refugees and their families to Canada.

I am pleased to report that the 100 families already admitted have shown a remarkable ability to integrate rapidly into Canadian

1640 HOUSE OF

Admission of Refugees

society. Some of the tuberculous cases have already been discharged from hospital and, with the modern methods of treatment available in Canada, it appears that most of the remaining cases will be discharged within the next two months. Few of the refugees afflicted with this illness will require prolonged treatment. It is also evident that all but a handful of the refugee families will become almost entirely self-supporting within two or three months.

I should like to stress that the choice of the 100 families which have been admitted was left entirely to the high commissioner for refugees. The government was prepared to accept the most serious cases should the high commissioner have thought it helpful to move them from their present locations in Europe.

This project for the admission of tuberculous refugees involved many novel problems for the Canadian authorities. Accordingly it was decided that at the outset the number of families to be admitted should be limited so that an appreciation of the precise problems could be obtained. Since a workable procedure has now been developed for rehabilitating these families, and since the period of treatment and integration has proved shorter than originally estimated, the government has decided to authorize the admission of additional families.

Tuberculous refugees in European camps have various destinations in mind for emigration, and the number wishing to come to Canada is not unlimited. Our representative in Geneva is now consulting with the high commissioner for refugees concerning the availability of additional numbers for inclusion in an extension of the original scheme.

Statements which have been made by representatives of several provinces lead us to believe that a number of provinces are prepared to join with the federal government in an extension of the original program on _ a basis similar to that which was worked out in connection with the first 100 families.

I am sure, Mr. Speaker, hon. members will agree that by originating and extending the program for admission of tuberculous refugees, Canada is making a substantial contribution toward the solution of one of the most difficult aspects of the refugee problem, which is the resettlement of the "hard core" cases.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   WORLD REFUGEE YEAR
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT ON ADMIS- SION OF ADDITIONAL REFUGEES
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure all members of the house will welcome the decision of the federal government to add to its responsibilities in respect of the admission of handicapped and tubercular refugees. I hope every effort will be made with the provincial

governments in so organizing things that this desirable movement may be carried out as far as possible, and that we will continue to do our share in liquidating this problem which has been with us now for so many years.

I would also express the hope that in considering the admission of additional refugees the government might not restrict the number to refugees in Europe, but that if cases can be found in Asia which are admissible in this category-there will be no discrimination against those cases from there.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   WORLD REFUGEE YEAR
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT ON ADMIS- SION OF ADDITIONAL REFUGEES
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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Hazen Argue (Assiniboia):

Mr. Speaker, for a number of months we in this group have been indicating that Canada should be more lenient in taking a larger number of refugees into our country. Therefore we are particularly pleased with the attitude taken and the announcement made by the Secretary of State for External Affairs.

He mentioned that some provinces appear to be prepared to go along with the announcement. I express the hope that some consultation has already taken place. This was one objection raised by Saskatchewan to the procedure that has been taken although, as I am sure the minister will agree, Saskatchewan was most pleased to co-operate in this undertaking. As the minister is no doubt aware, the Commonwealth of Australia has been most lenient in its immigration policy, much more so than our country, and we welcome the minister's announcement today.

Topic:   UNITED NATIONS
Subtopic:   WORLD REFUGEE YEAR
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT ON ADMIS- SION OF ADDITIONAL REFUGEES
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STARRED QUESTIONS

EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES CONTRACTS, NATO

CCF

Mr. Fisher

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Is there provision within the NATO infrastructure for competition bidding from member countries on any contracts for equipment and supplies?

2. If so, have Canada and Canadian companies entered any bids for such contracts in the past five years?

3. How many bids were made each year and how many to what value, for what items, by what companies, were successful?

4. What was the total value each year for the contracts let within the NATO infrastructure?

Topic:   STARRED QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES CONTRACTS, NATO
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

The answer to the first part of the question is yes; to the second part, yes; and to the third as follows. The Department of Trade and Commerce has notified Canadian companies of opportunities to bid but does not receive details of all bids submitted. As the host countries are not compelled to report results of bids received, complete information is not available. For the year 1955 there were no bids by Canadian companies. In 1956 there was one in connection with a pipe line installation. In 1957

Starred Questions

there were no bids, in 1958 two bids and in (R.C.). On January 1, 1960, A/C F. W. Mac-1959 four bids. These were in connection Lean, who was formerly deputy chaplain with communication equipment. As NATO general and director of religious administra-security regulations do not permit naming the tion R.C.A.F. (P.) was appointed chaplain successful bidder or the location of the general (P.) succeeding Brig. J. W. Forth. On project, we are unable to provide the other February 22, 1960 A/C L. A. Costello, who information asked for in question No. 3. was formerly deputy chaplain general and As to question No. 4, the total value of director of religious administration R.C.A.F. contracts let each year is not available, but (R.C.), was appointed chaplain general (R.C.) the over-all total expenditure to December succeeding Rev. R. MacLean.

31, 1959, is $1,540 million.

Topic:   STARRED QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES CONTRACTS, NATO
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POSTAL RATES ON NEWSPAPERS

March 2, 1960