July 14, 1959

INDIAN AFFAIRS


Second report of joint committee on Indian Affairs.-Mr. Dorion.


NATIONAL DEFENCE

INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM

PC

George Randolph Pearkes (Minister of National Defence)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. G. R. Pearkes (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to table in English and in French copies of the exchange of notes between the government of Canada and the government of the United States of America governing the establishment of the integrated communications system to support the ballistic missile early warning system.

The house will recall that I referred to this system in the report on defence issued last April. I made further reference to it on July 2 when introducing the estimates of my department, and again on July 4 in answer to a question from the Leader of the Opposition. As I explained then, to enable the detection and early warning of intercontinental ballistic missiles the United States is establishing detection units in northern regions external to Canada. These units will report directly to NORAD headquarters in order to allow defence measures to be initiated as quickly as possible.

The most direct and economic routes for the communication links between these detection units and NORAD headquarters traverse Canada. In keeping with our joint efforts with the United States for the air defence of the North American continent, the Canadian government is co-operating in facilitating the establishment of the necessary communication links across Canadian territory.

In the main the facilities will be provided by existing Canadian commercial companies and leased to the United States. In those areas where facilities do not now exist they will be constructed, with the work being done by Canadian companies. On completion they will be leased to the United States authorities. This work will be undertaken under mutually agreed arrangements between the United States and Canadian authorities.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM
Sub-subtopic:   EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN U.S. AND CANADA
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PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Has the minister leave to table the documents in question?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM
Sub-subtopic:   EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN U.S. AND CANADA
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   INTEGRATED COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEM
Sub-subtopic:   EXCHANGE OF NOTES BETWEEN U.S. AND CANADA
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URANIUM

REPORTED U.S. INTENTION TO REDUCE CANADIAN IMPORTS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

I should like to address a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce arising out of a press report of this morning. It deals with a matter of great importance and one which I have more than once brought to the attention of the minister. The report is from Washington, and is to the effect that the United States is about to make a big slash in imports of uranium, especially from Canada, after 1962. It is attributed to officials of the atomic energy commission and state department sources. Will the minister comment on this matter, especially in view of the anxiety that reports of this kind must arouse?

Topic:   URANIUM
Subtopic:   REPORTED U.S. INTENTION TO REDUCE CANADIAN IMPORTS
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

This matter has been up for discussion previously in the house. It hinges on the world supply of uranium. Naturally it is a matter of anxiety to Canadians, certainly in so far as uranium supplies may be concerned after 1962. The matter is under consideration, and we have had discussions with the authorities in the United States, but they have indicated that there is some uncertainty with regard to their requirements after 1962. They have much more abundant supplies of uranium now than was the case just a few years ago.

However, I do not think there is cause for alarm over this matter at the present time. This is the type of press report which will certainly arouse interest in areas where uranium is being produced, but we have time to work out a plan between Canada and the United States which may result in a satisfactory solution to what is a very difficult problem. However, basically we have to recognize that whereas a few years ago uranium was in short supply throughout the world, it is now not in short supply; hence the type of article to which my hon. friend refers.

Topic:   URANIUM
Subtopic:   REPORTED U.S. INTENTION TO REDUCE CANADIAN IMPORTS
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

Mr. Speaker, may I ask a supplementary question. Does the minister

5958 HOUSE OF

Inquiries of the Ministry not agree that while uranium may not be in short supply now, it is likely to be so in years to come, and therefore it is important to maintain this industry at its present level until that time arrives?

Topic:   URANIUM
Subtopic:   REPORTED U.S. INTENTION TO REDUCE CANADIAN IMPORTS
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

Quite right, Mr. Speaker. The forecasts I have been reading, produced by very competent scientists, indicate that the long term view shows that there will be a reasonably good demand for uranium. In fact some of those people estimate that by 1966, certainly by 1970, world demand will certainly equate with world supply. The difficult period lies between about 1962 and 1966. However, we are making a study of the situation. I have had reports from various sources with regard to this matter. Some are optimistic, one or two are a bit pessimistic, but generally the feeling is that as the peaceful uses of atomic energy are developed-and they are being developed rather widely now throughout the world- the demand for uranium will be sufficiently strong in the latter part of the 1960's that our uranium industry may be sustained.

Topic:   URANIUM
Subtopic:   REPORTED U.S. INTENTION TO REDUCE CANADIAN IMPORTS
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NORTHLAND NAVIGATION COMPANY

INQUIRY AS TO STRIKE SITUATION


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Frank Howard

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Frank Howard (Skeena):

Mr. Speaker, might I be permitted to direct a question to the Minister of Labour. I would like to ask the minister what report he can give the house about the progress, or lack of it, that Mr. Currie has made in his attempts to mediate in the dispute between Northland Navigation and the unions in Vancouver, in order to get services restored.

Topic:   NORTHLAND NAVIGATION COMPANY
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO STRIKE SITUATION
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PC

Michael Starr (Minister of Labour)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Michael Starr (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, my report is that a meeting of the interested parties was called by the labour representative yesterday. That meeting was held, some progress was made, and other meetings are being held today and on ensuing days.

Topic:   NORTHLAND NAVIGATION COMPANY
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO STRIKE SITUATION
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SHIPPING

July 14, 1959