August 16, 1958

ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEW EXPORT CONTROL LIST

PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I have an announcement to make with regard to the Canadian export control list. By order in council P.C. 1958-1158 of August 15, 1958, a new export control list is established, effective from August 16. This will be published in an early issue of the Canada Gazette, perhaps the August 27 issue. I have here copies of the revised export control list which I will table for the information of hon. members.

In revising our export control list in conformity with the agreed new strategic list, it has been the objective wherever possible to narrow the range of commodities of all types which will require export permits. As a result, in many cases items which remain under control have had to be defined in greater detail. Although the effect at first glance at the list disguises the real extent to which the list has been narrowed, examination will show that there have been very significant changes in the content of the list as far as Canadian export trade is concerned. Such items as aluminum, copper, and many forms of nickel have been dropped from control, as have a number of items of metalworking machinery, general industrial equipment, electronic equipment, transportation equipment and chemical products. The revised list will include as new items certain electronic devices, jet fuels, containers for liquid gases, and certain chemicals.

Many of the items which have been dropped from the list in all likelihood will find no place in our exports to Soviet bloc destinations. The most significant effect of removal of control in these cases is that permits will no longer be required for exports to friendly countries. The export control list, moreover, serves an important function in indicating those items which are regarded as strategic, and an endeavour has been made to set forth the list in such form that traders may use it for this purpose. This means that if items are not on the export control list, permits will be readily available for export to any Soviet bloc destination on application. Permits

for all exports to Soviet bloc destinations will still be required under our general area control of shipments to such destinations.

It is our purpose in administering export controls to reduce the paper work for all concerned to the essential minimum, and to eliminate misunderstanding. Our new export control list will serve as a clear lead as to strategic control policy. We are prepared to discuss with exporters ways and means by which we can still further simplify for them the procedure in complying with the remaining controls. Special permits can be used for regular shipments of items on the export control list to specified destinations, and further general permits for specified goods to destinations subject to area control. These possibilities will be given continuing attention in the department, and exporters are invited to indicate their interests. Our objective is a major reduction in the necessity for individual licences.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEW EXPORT CONTROL LIST
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

In connection with a statement the minister has just made, may I ask whether when he uses the expression "Soviet bloc countries" he includes continental China in that group, and if not whether there is a special list for continental China?

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEW EXPORT CONTROL LIST
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

Continental China is included. There is no special list for that country now.

Topic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF NEW EXPORT CONTROL LIST
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U.S.S.R.-REPORTED OPENING OF TRADE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Hazen Argue (Assiniboia):

Mr. Speaker, would the Minister of Trade and Commerce care to comment on a press report this morning to the effect that Canada is considering the opening of a trade commissioner's office in Moscow this fall? Would the minister further say whether he is giving consideration to a personal tour of Soviet bloc countries in the interests of expanding trade?

Topic:   U.S.S.R.-REPORTED OPENING OF TRADE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, both these questions were raised when the estimates of trade and commerce were before the house and I commented on them on that occasion; this is simply a repetition. I said at that time

Inquiries of the Ministry that we were seriously considering the question of posting a trade commissioner to Russia, but that at the moment no decision has been reached.

With regard to whether or not I was contemplating a trade mission, I said at that time that consideration was being given to active trade promotion but that I had not reached a decision as to what countries might be visited.

Topic:   U.S.S.R.-REPORTED OPENING OF TRADE COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE
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NAFEL-PROPOSED PROCEDURE FOLLOWING WITHDRAWAL OF SPECIAL PERMITS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Roy Tucker

Liberal

Mr. J. R. Tucker (Trinity-Conception):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce. On August 1 the minister announced that the government had decided that the exclusive right of export held by the Newfoundland Associated Fish Exporters Limited would terminate next July. I should like to ask the minister if he will advise this house what the government proposes to substitute for NAFEL.

Topic:   NAFEL-PROPOSED PROCEDURE FOLLOWING WITHDRAWAL OF SPECIAL PERMITS
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, this subject has been before the house by way of question and answer on several occasions. We received representations from interested parties engaged in the Atlantic fisheries, and I stated at the time the date was set for the conclusion of the exclusive right of NAFEL that we were quite prepared to continue negotiations with the interested parties in order to arrive at some solution to the problem. It has to be a joint undertaking, not one solely sponsored or proposed by the dominion government; there is a responsibility resting upon the provincial government of Newfoundland and upon the associations that are engaged in the fishing industry.

I can assure the hon. member that we are quite prepared to play our part in these negotiations and to provide some of the initiative required to arrange meetings of the interested parties, and I hope that before too many months have gone by a solution to this very important problem can be reached. We have made quite a study of the difficulties facing the Atlantic fisheries, and there is no question at all but that steps should be taken, perhaps jointly between the dominion government and the provincial government, to solve some of these difficulties.

Topic:   NAFEL-PROPOSED PROCEDURE FOLLOWING WITHDRAWAL OF SPECIAL PERMITS
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

MIDDLE EAST

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, a number of hon.

TMr. Churchill.]

members have asked me respecting the major developments which have taken place during the emergency special session of the general assembly up to the time of its adjournment yesterday.

President Eisenhower, in his statesmanlike speech, made a number of points which deserve the close attention of all members of the United Nations. Among those points was the emphasis which he placed on the need for the economic development of the area in the Middle East and the need to have the function of leadership invested in the Arab states themselves. Similarly, in the suggestions he made for a United Nations body to examine the question of the flow of heavy armament to the nations of the Middle East, he stressed that any arrangements made in this connection must reflect the views of the countries of the region.

The President made a number of other suggestions in which Canada has a continuing interest and which are now undergoing thorough study.

One of the suggestions made by the President, that for a stand-by United Nations peace force, is of course of particular importance and interest to Canada, because we have consistently advocated the need for flexible United Nations machinery which can be employed to prevent dangerous international situations from developing into international hostilities. We hope the present crisis in the Middle East will focus the attention of members of the United Nations on the necessity for taking steps so the United Nations can quickly and effectively deal with threats to any country's independence and integrity, not only to restore order once hostilities have broken out but to prevent armed conflict from breaking out at all.

The points made by the President that I have mentioned so far relate to long-term problems in the area which may require extensive consideration and detailed preparation, because they are essentially regional problems. There are, of course, more immediate problems in the area demanding early solution. President Eisenhower referred to these as well in his references to United Nations concern for Lebanon and to the need for United Nations measures to preserve peace in Jordan. The United Kingdom foreign secretary and others have also dealt in preliminary fashion with the issues involved. However, the statement of the Jordanian delegate on Thursday to the effect that Jordan did not wish to have either United Nations observers or a United Nations force on its territory has introduced a new and unexpected element, requiring careful examination in the light of further information that may become available. The Jordanian

authorities have not, however, ruled out some form of UN representation appropriate to the situation in their country.

The task now, as we see it, would be to attempt to develop solutions to these problems in an atmosphere of mutual co-operation and restraint. I am sure the house will agree that this process will not be facilitated by too many public utterances or the taking of firm positions. I would hope that all those countries directly concerned would exercise moderation and forethought in anything they may say or do in the circumstances.

I think it is only fair to say that Canadians as a whole will be very pleased that during the last few days at the United Nations it has been generally recognized that the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Smith) has played a full and important part in these important negotiations.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MIDDLE EAST
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT ON DEVELOPMENTS AT UN SPECIAL ASSEMBLY
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, the house I know will have heard with great interest the Prime Minister's statement on the important developments taking place at the United Nations assembly in New York. I do not wish to add to any public statements that are being made, but I should like to state my agreement with what the Prime Minister has said to the effect that the original statement of the President of the United States was hopeful in the sense that it seemed to put forward ideas which might serve as a basis for a resolution providing for United Nations action in the Middle East which might help to solve some of these problems. This action, however, if it is to be effective will have to include the participation of all the leading members of the United Nations.

As the Prime Minister has said, the reaction of the representative of Jordan in his original statement was discouraging. I sincerely hope it will be possible for the Jordanian government to alter the position which it seems to have taken in this statement and which is very difficult to understand coming from a country whose stability is now being protected by the troops of the United Kingdom.

It is difficult to understand why a country in that position should hesitate to accept replacement by a kind of international intervention which would make possible the withdrawal of the United Kingdom troops. We must hope that that position can be altered.

I would like also to assure the Prime Minister that we all, without regard to party, are happy about the activities of the Canadian delegation. We know that under the leadership of the Secretary of State for External Affairs they will play a useful and constructive part in those developments.

Broadcasting

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MIDDLE EAST
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT ON DEVELOPMENTS AT UN SPECIAL ASSEMBLY
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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Hazen Argue (Assiniboia):

Mr. Speaker, we in the C.C.F. are pleased with the hopeful indications from the United Nations that this very grave problem may be solved. We feel that our stand in past weeks, when we said that United States and United Kingdom troops should not have gone into that area and should subsequently have been withdrawn, has proven to be correct.

We were pleased with the statement by the President of the United States. We hope it may be possible to establish United Nations forces or United Nations observer teams in that area which will replace the troops from outside nations who are now stationed there. We further hope that this will be accompanied by a large-scale economic development program, always bearing in mind the interests of the citizens of that area.

I have read with approval the press reports of the decision taken by the Canadian delegation at the United Nations. I agree with the Leader of the Opposition that the stand taken by Jordan is most disturbing. I have also read with concern reports of the position being taken by the United Kingdom and the great reluctance to withdraw her troops from Jordan. In spite of the position taken by the United Kingdom, I hope Canada will press forward on a middle course, designed to bring peace to that area. Since we are a very important and prominent member of the commonwealth, we may exert over the United Kingdom that influence necessary to bring the United Kingdom and the United States into agreement, together, we hope, with other major powers, so that peace will be restored and maintained in that area.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   MIDDLE EAST
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT ON DEVELOPMENTS AT UN SPECIAL ASSEMBLY
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CUSTOMS ACT


Hon. George C. Nowlan (Minister of National Revenue) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. C-51, to amend the Customs Act. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


BROADCASTING

August 16, 1958