May 27, 1958

LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

I will let you know.

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PC

Frank Charles McGee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McGee:

What page number? *

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

The same pages you used and the same pages that most hon. members in your party are using when they are addressing the house.

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An hon. Member:

They make better

speeches, though.

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PC

Léon Balcer (Solicitor General of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Balcer:

They are better readers.

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PC

Frank Charles McGee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McGee:

Why not write your own speech instead of reading quotations from ours?

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

If you can name anyone else who wrote this speech, I would like to know about it.

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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

At least your father-in-law does not write them.

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PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

Order.

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

It is quite possible, and I realize it, that what I am saying may hurt and consequently interruptions will doubtless be made, but if they are made according to the rules of the house I will be very happy to deal with them.

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An hon. Member:

Give it to them; they deserve it.

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

I suggest that the government's action in stopping immigration creates a dangerous and vicious circle. The hon. member for Queens-Lunenburg (Mr. Crouse) bemoaned the fact that unemployment is the result of Canada's loss of its export market; it lost most of its customers. I agree with that statement. We constantly seek to remedy this sad situation and we must find other consumers of goods produced by Canadian labour. If there are no customers available abroad let us have them at home. This cannot be accomplished by a closed door or carefully selected immigration policy. A policy of this nature will only perpetuate unemployment. I therefore address myself to the government urging it to give careful consideration to a synthesis of these two approaches which will genuinely benefit this greatly underpopulated country and provide an ample home market for Canadian manufactured goods and thus reduce, and in time altogether eliminate, unemployment.

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Frank Charles McGee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McGee:

Page 12.

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

What was that comment?

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PC

Frank Charles McGee

Progressive Conservative

Mr. McGee:

Page 12.

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

How do you know it is page 12? The hon. member is probably impatient, but he will doubtless be a little more impatient as I progress.

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An hon. Member:

You mean regress.

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LIB

Leon David Crestohl

Liberal

Mr. Crestohl:

I would also like to refer briefly to two items only one of which was referred to in the throne speech and it is my humble opinion that the other also should have been dealt with.

I shall deal first with the one which was omitted. I was considerably surprised that no encouragement was given in support of education especially at the university level. This is all the more astonishing because of the national conference on education which took place in Ottawa recently and at which the government was represented. It heard at first hand of the mounting crisis in education all across the country and it was therefore anticipated that appropriate consideration would be given this matter in the throne speech. Whilst assistance is urgently needed in every part of the country the situation is

catastrophic in some sections to a degree that commands national attention.

The world has moved from the muscle age to the missile age, and without extolling the general values of education it is an accepted fact that we in Canada are woefully far behind the enemies of democracy in the field of research, such a vital factor in our national defence. Inadequate facilities for higher learning can unfortunately become a national disaster and therefore the problem merits energetic attention without delay.

It was a sad thing to learn the other day that the University of Montreal, one of our great institutions of learning and the one where I had the privilege of studying law, is facing the prospect of closing its doors for lack of funds. In fact, Monsignor Lussier, its rector, one of Canada's outstanding pedagogues and teachers, is quoted as saying:

The university's forthcoming budget will show its disastrous financial situation. Education costs the college three times as much as the fees collected from students, and in certain cases as much as six times the cost to the student. The university is dying.

What a tragedy. Think of it; a great university is dying. Will we, the national parliament of Canada, sit idly by and listen to its death groans and occupy our time by fiddling around with technical and constitutional problems and not come to its rescue?

Do hon. members know that, apart from the incalculable value that this institution has been to Canada in the past, it now houses perhaps the greatest research laboratory in the world for nervous diseases and tensions under the direction of Dr. Hans Selye, who is acknowledged the world's greatest authority on this subject? I would recommend to hon. members on the other side who are impatient that perhaps it would do them some good to consult Dr. Selye.

Can we, on the national level, permit our country to lose such an authority and teacher? Our youth is already too seriously prejudiced by the exorbitant increases in university fees to allow it to be even more seriously prejudiced by losing Canada's great teachers and reducing the number of our universities. That would be a national tragedy, as I previously said, and an unthinkable setback to the intellectual and scientific development of our country.

I have mentioned the case of the University of Montreal only to underscore the seriousness of the situation. Extreme difficulties are being experienced by McGill University, my alma mater, which, although it receives substantial subventions, has nevertheless been compelled to increase tuition fees twice since last September. Every other university and institution of higher learning in the province

The Address-Mr. Crestohl of Quebec has been seriously hurt by the fact that they are prevented from accepting help from the national treasury. Although there are great problems facing the government, this one is no less important than most of the others.

There may, perhaps, have been some constitutional or political implications why the premier of Quebec has not in the past favoured the acceptance by Quebec universities of the assistance which was proffered by a federal government with which he was not in political sympathy. I am hopeful that the Prime Minister, who now heads a government with which the premier of Quebec appears to have more sympathy, will be able to work out a means by which the universities in the province of Quebec can be given the relief they so anxiously seek.

It will be a sad day for our universities- indeed, for the whole of Canada-if the premier of Quebec persists in his refusal to favour federal government grants to universities in the province of Quebec, unless some other method is devised by our constitutional and legislative giants not only to relieve the present difficulties of the Quebec universities but also to extend facilities for increased university education for all Canadians. This, I submit, should be done now and not later. There is some hope that the Prime Minister's announcement, which he promised a few days ago to make in the near future, concerning this problem will provide a form of relief that will be acceptable to the universities, to the premier of Quebec and to the entire country.

I would now like to deal with the second matter which, as I stated, was referred to in the throne speech, namely the problem of unemployment. With some daring, perhaps, I desire to offer a suggestion to the government, which it may consider to have some merit, to help relieve this painful situation. It is an accepted fact that lack of sales of our merchandise is responsible for a large part of unemployment. Both wholesalers and retailers are carrying tremendous inventories. If a method can be devised whereby these stocks may be moved to consumers a cycle of employment would naturally follow. I think such a cycle would be created if the government would forthwith proclaim a sales tax holiday for 30 days. Permit me to attempt to explain briefly what this would mean in its practical form as I see it.

The other day it was stated that savings bank balances were never as high as they are now. In other words, the consumer has the means to purchase, and if he can be induced to buy, the chain reaction will commence to function. President Eisenhower's

564 HOUSE OF

The Address-Mr. Crestohl "buy now" plea to the United States public is meeting with great success. His plea to the United States people is based purely on patriotic grounds. Our "buy now" request for this 30-day period will have the added inducement of reduced prices that should be even more successful than the United States program. Automobiles, for example, would at once be available at prices reduced by approximately $200 or $300; refrigerators, television sets, radios, electrical appliances, furniture and all other commodities would be reduced in price.

If the federal government could in some way persuade the provincial and municipal authorities likewise to grant this 30-day holiday in the sales tax which is locally imposed, an added impetus to buying would result. We could stimulate the greatest buying boom in Canadian history. It was never more needed than it is now. Canadian economists are unanimous in saying that nothing would be more helpful to reduce unemployment than such a buying spree. Inventories in retail stores will in this way become quickly depleted. The storekeepers will then turn to the wholesalers for renewed supplies; the wholesalers will then turn to the manufacturers; the manufacturers' inventories will be reduced and they in turn will call on labour to replenish their stocks. There is the chain reaction resulting from a tax holiday on only 30 days.

It may be true that the sales tax holiday may temporarily deprive the government of some of its revenue, but that will be quickly compensated by the reduction in unemployment relief costs and by income tax which will be available from many individuals who now have no earnings and therefore pay no income tax.

I am told that our income from sales tax is about $56 million per month and that would be the approximate loss in income to the government from sales tax during this 30-day holiday. In one month-I think in the month of March-some $79 million alone was paid out in unemployment relief. If we can stimulate this buying activity, first of all the payments for unemployment relief will be considerably reduced. There will be additional income from income tax. All of these people who will be selling merchandise in this terrific "buy boom" will certainly be earning money instead of having their inventories accumulating dust on their shelves.

I am confident that the $56 million which the government will not collect in sales tax during that month will be abundantly compensated in the very near future, and certainly they will profit by it in the long run.

That is my humble suggestion for some form of speedy relief to our unemployment problem.

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Mr. Ed. R. Lockyer@Trinity

Mr. Speaker, I should like to join the many others in offering you my hearty congratulations in again being selected by your fellow members to rule this house. Your dignity and poise make a commendable contribution to the high order of procedure in this parliament. I join in the chorus of others in congratulating the Deputy Speaker (Mr. Sevigny) and the deputy chairman of committees of the whole house (Mr. Rea). I am sure we are all impressed by the eloquence and the masterly way in which the mover (Mr. Lafreniere) and the seconder (Mr. Nielsen) opened the debate on the speech from the throne.

I have the honour to represent Trinity riding which is located almost exactly in the centre of Toronto. It is bounded on the south by the shores of lake Ontario and to the immediate west lie the grounds of the great Canadian National Exhibition. Nearly three million people from the United States and Canada visit the booths of this exhibition and view the exhibits of our respective provinces. There is also in this riding the home of the famous Massey-Ferguson plant, manufacturers of world known tractors, combines and other farm machinery; in addition there is in it part of the John Inglis plant and the York Knitting Mills. You can therefore readily see that I am concerned about the employment situation and the definite steps this government has taken to stimulate job opportunities. It will be my purpose and endeavour to assist in every way possible to develop our economy so that every able bodied man enjoys the dignity of gainful employment. I am sure that with the great national program indicated in the speech from the throne those happy days are not too far away.

We have also in Trinity riding two large senior citizens' homes, namely Lambert Lodge, which was formerly the Christie street soldiers' hospital, this home houses 750 senior citizens, and Hilltop Acres with over 200 therein. Those two homes are considered to be models of their kind on the continent and they are being constantly improved. The folks in these homes lived pioneering lives in a Canada far removed from what we see around us today. Their sacrifices and loyal devotion in their own way helped to lay the foundation for the Canada we enjoy. I know they would want me to thank the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefen-baker) and his government for making life somewhat easier for them in the sunset of their lives by increasing old age pensions

from the scandalous amount of $46 per month proposed by the Liberals to the $55 which they now receive with gratitude. It is my hope that when the study of the United States and other social security programs is completed we shall be able to be even more realistic in our assistance to our senior citizens.

We have in Trinity riding people from many lands who selected Canada as their future home. They brought to us their culture and skills to enrich and enhance our progress as a nation. Many have set up businesses and are self-employed. Not a few have started industries employing many others. Many of these fine people by perseverance and ingenious methods escaped the tyranny and cruel design of their communist masters. The freedom they now enjoy to work out their own destiny is shadowed only by the horrible fact that many of their friends and relatives are still slaves of these godless tyrants. May Providence speed the day when these vicious men reap what they have sown. The people in my riding will welcome the bill of rights legislation as a hope or guarantee that no future government by any act will ever deprive them of their own individual rights.

I should like to speak briefly on our growing problems in education, fully realizing that legislative improvements are provincial prerogatives under our constitution. However, notwithstanding this consideration, the facts are that with the growing importance of science, higher mathematics, chemistry and physics in our civilization, education becomes a great national concern. The advent of sputniks and muttniks has aroused apprehension as to whether we are training the best brains we have in sufficient numbers to keep up with developments in other countries.

The people of Canada should know that we are spending far too little of our national income on education. It might surprise hon. members of this house, who no doubt have heard groanings in their respective ridings about the extravagant spending on education, that we are actually spending less than a loaf of bread or a bottle of milk and much less than a package of cigarettes per day per family for education in Canada. This includes elementary and secondary school costs of less than two and a half per cent of our national income or, if we include higher learning, less than three and a half per cent of our national income. If we compare this expenditure with that of the U.S.S.R. we find that they spend over ten per cent of their national income on education. We have boys and girls richly endowed with talent and inquiring minds capable of great contribution in research who

The Address-Mr. Lockyer for lack of encouragement and monetary help become a tragic brain waste to Canada.

I had the privilege of attending a United States convention dealing with the exceptional child and at which there were 1,600 delegates in attendance, 60 from Canada; and one thing I observed was a sense of urgency. I submit that our freedom is so closely allied to scientific achievement that we need a sense of urgency here in Canada. May I quote from an address by Dr. C. C. Goldring entitled "Is Education Facing a Crisis or a Challenge". He is dealing with teacher shortage. Dr. Goldring is director of education in the city of Toronto. He said this:

I should like now to deal more extensively with one or two of the problems mentioned in this brief survey. The first is the problem of teacher supply. Recently the dominion bureau of statistics at Ottawa issued a report which puts before the people of Canada in a realistic manner the very great crisis to be faced during the next few years. According to this report there are at present approximately 123,200 teachers in the public and independent schools of Quebec and the publicly controlled schools of the other nine provinces. Let us assume that an elementary school teacher should have at least high school graduation at the junior matriculation level plus one full year of teacher training, and a secondary school teacher at least a university degree plus one full year of teacher training or the equivalent. On this basis, 25,250 of the teachers-slightly more than one in five- possess less than the desirable amount of education and training. In other words, this year not more than four out of every five teachers in Canada possess minimum qualifications for the work that they are doing. It might be added that the report states that 9,000 additional teachers are now needed to eliminate overcrowding. This picture of teacher shortage is not good. However, there seems to be little immediate probability of any considerable improvement.

Between 1956 and 1965 it is estimated that the elementary school enrolment in Canada will increase by 32.9 per cent and the secondary school enrolment in the same period will increase by 60 per cent. Accordingly, in seven years the requirements will be not for 123,000 teachers, one-fifth of whom do not possess the minimum qualifications, but 230,100 qualified teachers. By 1970, Canada will require 367,400 qualified teachers according to present estimates. It is evident that a very active and successful campaign must be carried on to secure and train these additional teachers.

You will note that in pointing out the future crisis in the availability of trained teachers Dr. Goldring quotes from our own bureau of statistics. I have some additional figures here showing a comparison of the university graduates as between the United States and Canada. In the year 1955-56, there were 311,295 students who received degrees from United States universities. In Canada, during the same year, 13,000 students received degrees. The ratio, based on population, of those receiving degrees was 2J times greater in the United States than in Canada. I submit that is not a healthy condition for education in our nation.

586 HOUSE OF

The Address-Mr. Lockyer

Having these factors in mind, I will support the resolution offered by the hon. member for Davenport (Mr. Morton) that a fact-finding committee be set up to study how the government can give greater assistance to education.

I further propose that a conference of provincial ministers of education be called to discuss their respective problems and suggest also that this government make available generous grants, as bursaries or in some other form, to assist students. I realize this is not a solution but it would be of immediate help. I believe that just as we have achieved free elementary and secondary education we should set our sights on free university education in Canada.

The next matter I wish to discuss is housing. The Progressive Conservative government deserves great credit for courageously facing this problem and making $750 million in mortgage money available to assist building and employment. In my constituency housing is almost the number one problem. Family accommodation is impossible to obtain. As a member of the city of Toronto planning board I participated in a detailed survey of two of our blighted areas which, I believe, are common to nearly all urban centres. In brief, we found that our tax recovery due to low valuation did not nearly compensate for the health costs, police costs, fire costs or education costs. It was felt, therefore, that these areas should be rebuilt with suitable accommodation for families which would be available at rentals within their earning capacity. These projects should be pursued as an employment aid, and with a view to rehabilitating the families into more wholesome surroundings. Our experience with Regent Park, a low-rental development, has been gratifying. We have reduced the cost of nearly every municipal service. May I suggest that the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Green) give this aspect of the matter serious thought. Services and transportation are already available in such areas and they should form a definite part of our building program.

In the matter of National Housing Act developments, I would suggest that because down payments and other expenses to make new homes livable are heavy, the cost of stoves and refrigerators, which are as necessary as sinks and furnaces, be included in the overall mortgage.

I have heard a great many post mortems performed by hon. gentlemen in the opposition, but not one of them seemed to realize how far out of touch they were with the people of Canada. I submit that the Prime Minister, in his great appeal to the people of Canada, simply awoke the sleeping giant

and put into words a vision concealed in the hearts of Canadians in every part of this country. If the hon. gentlemen of the opposition would contribute constructively instead of obstructing by a multiplicity of meaningless words, as we witnessed in the delaying of the housing bill and the unemployment insurance extension bill, they would earn a great deal more respect, at least from the members who are new in this house.

It is a great honour that my friends have conferred on me in electing me to sit in this great body. My constituency was once represented by one of Canada's great sports competitors, the late Lionel Conacher. I shall ever be conscious of my duty to give my best to assist this great government, since it represents more completely than any other government in history the people of Canada. The speeches we have heard from members from every province indicating unity awakens an even greater sense of pride in one, at being part of this great Progressive Conservative party. To the people of Trinity, regardless of race, colour or creed, may I say that I shall ever be their humble servant.

(Translation):

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LIB

Marcel Boivin

Liberal

Mr. Marcel Boivin (Shefford):

Mr. Speaker, I feel I should, first of all, add my congratulations to those already proffered to you as well as to the mover and seconder of the address in reply to the speech from the throne, the hon. members for Quebec-Mont-morency (Mr. Lafreniere) and the Yukon (Mr. Nielsen).

From the start of the debate on the address in reply to the speech from the throne, our new fellow-members have realized how much you deserved to be called upon to fill the post you are occupying now for a second term.

I am also happy to stress the wisdom of the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefenbaker) in appointing the hon. member for Longueuil (Mr. Sevigny), in spite of outside criticism, to the post of Deputy Speaker. But, after this house learned about the parliamentary background of his family for the past 40 years from the hon. Minister of Finance (Mr. Fleming) on Wednesday, May 14th last, the still existing dissatisfaction has somewhat abated, even if a Conservative member of the last parliaments has not been chosen. But this was not the only instance of discontent in the Conservative ranks.

Reminding us of the stay of his father in this house, the Minister of Finance revived old memories in the mind of "Yours truly". On the opening of the 13th parliament, on March 18, 1918, the Hon. Edgar N. Rhodes,

member for Cumberland, succeeded his father as Speaker. Three days after this appointment one of the predecessors of the hon. Prime Minister-and I mean the Hon. Sir Robert Borden, then prime minister-called the attention of the house to standing order 13 of the rules of the house in these words:

The thirteenth rule of the House provides that a Chairman of Committees of the House shall be elected at the commencement of every Parliament as soon as an Address has been agreed to in answer to His Excellency's speech, and the second paragraph of that rule provides that the member elected to serve as Deputy Speaker and Chairman of Committees shall be required to possess a full and practical knowledge of the language which is not that of the Speaker for the time being. Now your language, Mr. Speaker, is English, although occasionally you make successful excursions into the French language. Unfortunately, we are not blessed on this side of the House with a very large number of gentlemen who fulfil the qualifications required by the second paragraph of the rule which I have just quoted. The junior member for Ottawa (Mr. Chabot) does undoubtedly possess those qualifications, but he finds himself unable to undertake the duties. Possibly, there are one or two other members on this side of the House who might be considered as possessing the knowledge alluded to. However, it has always been the custom of this House that when the Chair is filled by a Speaker of British descent, the Deputy Speaker shall be one who traces his origin to the other great pioneer race in this country. It seems to me inadvisable that we

should depart from that practice at the present time. I have spoken to my right hon. friend the Leader of the Opposition on the subject, as I would not care to make a motion of this kind with regard to an hon. gentleman on the other side of the House without conferring with him. The hon. member for Shefford (Mr. Boivin) has had an experience in this House of some six or seven years. He is eminently qualified by ability and by temperament to undertake the duties which would devolve upon the Deputy Speaker and Chairman of Committees. Moreover, he has shown a careful study and an intimate knowledge of the rules, as has been demonstrated on more than one occasion when questions of order were discussed in the late Parliament. I have, therefore, great pleasure in moving, seconded by Sir George Foster:

That George Henry Boivin, Esquire, member of the electoral district of Shefford, be appointed Chairman of the Committees of the Whole House.

On this occasion, the Right Hon. Sir Wilfrid Laurier reminded the house that there was no bilingual member of parliament capable of filling the post of Deputy Speaker to be found in the ranks of the Conservative party and here I quote his words:

Mr. Speaker, my right hon. friend has stated the rules of the house correctly, and I hope the spirit in which he makes his motion, of recognizing the different elements which compose our population, will prevail at all times. The rule with regard to the election of a Deputy Speaker has worked satisfactorily in the past, and I am sure I hope it will continue to work so in the future. My right hon. friend has stated that, unfortunately for the Government, it is not blessed with many supporters speaking the language which ought to be spoken by the Chairman of Committees. I regret that as much as he does, but it is his own

The Address-Mr. Boivin

fault and not the fault of the people to whom he alluded, and when he mends his ways he may be sure of having better support.

Mr. Speaker, Conservative members from the other provinces have always been opposed to the Quebec members enjoying their share in the House of Commons and, to support that statement, I would like to quote here words to be found on page 75 of Hansard of March 21, 1918, which were spoken by Mr. Currie, the then Conservative member for Simcoe-North. I quote:

It is true that it has been the custom to appoint a member from Quebec to the position either of Speaker or of Deputy Speaker, but there are other members in the house outside the province of Quebec who have a knowledge of the French language, and I think that some steps should have been taken to appoint one of those members. Moreover, if the province of Quebec is desirous of being represented in the person of the Deputy Speaker, the constitutional practice should have been followed, one of the members of the Opposition should have resigned and allowed a supporter of this government to take his seat and the Deputy Speakership. That is customary. The Speaker and the Deputy Speaker of the House are chosen by the majority in the House. They represent the views of the majority of the House.

That Conservative member, Mr. Speaker, then made an unfortunate statement and I quote: *

I have not forgotten the opposition of the hon. member for Shefford (Mr. Boivin) to the Military Service Act and to the attempts on the part of members on this side of the House to send aid to the soldiers in the trenches.

May I recall that after the war of 19141918, my late father received from the Pope a decoration that was presented to him by the apostolic delegate to Canada, at the Chateau Laurier in Ottawa, as a token of gratitude for what he had done for our soldiers fighting overseas during that war, which contradicts, in itself, the statement of the Conservative member of that time. I would like to add that this was the only occasion since confederation when a Liberal member was appointed Deputy Speaker of this house under a Conservative administration.

I take this opportunity to extend my most sincere congratulations to my colleagues to the right on the facility with which they have learned our language. The incident of 1918, I am sure, will not be repeated.

When the Deputy Speaker of this house who represents, as I do, a south shore constituency was appointed I remembered that his father had been minister of internal revenue, a portfolio which my father held later on in the first government of Mr. Mackenzie King when that department was called the department of customs and excise.

The Address-Mr. Boivin

I also wish to offer my congratulations to the hon. member for Spadina (Mr. Rea) upon his appointment to the post of deputy chairman of committees.

I would like to offer my congratulations to the Prime Minister, to the new government members, and I wish to refer in particular to the hon. members for Labelle (Mr. Courte-manche) and Lotbiniere (Mr. O'Hurley), as well as to the hon. minister from Hamilton-West (Mrs. Fairclough) who has been entrusted with the Department of Citizenship and Immigration.

I am also pleased to offer my congratulations to the new members, the majority of whom are sitting on your right, Mr. Speaker. I would ask them, however, not to delude themselves, since during the last five parliaments that I have been here, many have passed in this house and history tells us that every time a Conservative government came into power, its existence was of short duration.

Congratulations are in order in the case of my colleagues sitting on the left side of the house for their speeches in this debate.

I also wish to thank most sincerely the organizers and electors of the constituency I have the honour of representing in this house for the confidence they gave me a fifth time, and I wish to tell them that I am very grateful and that I will continue, as in the past, to devote myself to their interests.

I would like to mention, Mr. Speaker, that the city of Granby, where I was born, will celebrate next year its first centennial. As a matter of fact, the municipal authorities have already begun organizing those festivities, and it is my wish that they mark a new advance in peace, understanding and continuous prosperity. I take this opportunity to express my best wishes to the first magistrate and the citizens of the city of Granby.

Mr. Speaker, the Conservative party, under the able guidance of its leader and through good publicity, gained once again the confidence of the Canadian people and was returned to power. The publicity of their last campaign gave me an opportunity to look into my files; I found that their publicity was the same as it was at the time of the Hon. R. B. Bennett. Yes, indeed, my colleagues here will remember the publicity made in October, 1935. The Minister of Finance took us back 40 years. This time, I am going back 23 years. During the 1935 campaign, senator J. H. Rainville, director of the Conservative campaign, wrote a letter entitled:

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May 27, 1958