January 11, 1958

HOUSE OF COMMONS DEBATES

OFFICIAL REPORT


Saturday, January 11, 1958


HOUSING

CAMP BORDEN

PC

Howard Charles Green (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Howard C. Green (Minister of Public Works):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to advise the house that contracts were awarded on January 8 by Central Mortgage and Housing Corporation covering the construction of 160 housing units and related services at Camp Borden, Ontario, the details of which are as follows: A contract for 160 housing units awarded to Grisenthwaite Construction Company Limited of Hamilton for a price of $1,563,176, and to Swansea Construction Company Limited of Toronto a contract in the sum of $171,062.64 for sewer and water services and roads.

In accordance with the government's wish to undertake as much work as possible during the winter months, these contracts have been awarded on the understanding that the work will begin as soon as possible. To this end it is planned that work will start about January 20. It is contemplated that as the work proceeds the labour force required will reach a peak of from 250 to 300 men employed directly on the site. The number of men indirectly employed in the supply of material and equipment will, of course, greatly exceed the number directly employed.

Topic:   HOUSING
Subtopic:   CAMP BORDEN
Sub-subtopic:   STATEMENT WITH RESPECT TO NEW CONTRACTS AWARDED
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

ADJOURNMENT PROM WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 15, TO FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 17

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister) moved:

That, notwithstanding the provisions of any standing or special order of the house, the hours of sitting on Wednesday next, January 15, shall be from 11.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m., with the usual intermission at 1.00 p.m., and that when the house adjourns at 6.00 p.m. on Wednesday next, it shall stand adjourned until 11.00 a.m. on Friday, January 17.

He said: Mr. Speaker, there is an event being held next week in the city of Ottawa which concerns all Canadians. Under our democratic system all of us are deeply interested, as Canadians as a whole will be, in the proceedings which will take place in this city leading to the selection of a chieftain for the Liberal party in succession to Right Hon. Louis St. Laurent, if I may be allowed to mention his name in that way.

Parliament, however, has been called back. Most of us had felt that the session would have been over; and no doubt that probability was in the minds of those responsible for calling and setting the date of the convention. I make this motion in all sincerity to indicate the interest of Canadians as a whole in the momentous proceedings which are to take place.

The public interest, as I see it, would not be served by an adjournment of parliament throughout the entire period of the convention. I say this to my hon. friends opposite; that in no way has it been suggested to me by them that this house should adjourn at any time during the convention. What I am proposing, in the motion that has been referred to by Your Honour, is to be done in the interest of Canadians as a whole and of hon. members in all parts of this house. Certainly we on the government side of the house realize that above everything else in our system of government a strong opposition is necessary.

The nominations for the selection of the leader, according to the agenda as published in the press, will be made on Wednesday evening. Then throughout Thursday there will be a number of meetings culminating finally in the choice of the new leader of the Liberal party who, in consequence of that selection, will become leader of Her Majesty's loyal opposition.

In order to show the attitude taken by the government with regard to the importance of this occasion and to enable hon. members to participate in that most important duty- the selection of a leader-I move this resolution, and say to my hon. friends opposite that if during the progress of the convention there are any matters on the agenda of parliament which they feel are of such a controversial nature that they ought not to be discussed in the absence of any of the members of the opposition, I shall do my part to comply with any requests I may receive. It is in that spirit that I move this motion.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ADJOURNMENT PROM WEDNESDAY EVENING, JANUARY 15, TO FRIDAY MORNING, JANUARY 17
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Motion agreed to.


MOTION THAT JANUARY 13 BE A GOVERNMENT DAY

PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister) moved:

That Monday next, January 13. shall be a government day and the provisions of standing order 15 (3) shall be suspended in relation thereto.

He said: The motion in question is selfexplanatory. There are eight days allotted

Business of the House

for private members during the session. Six of these are Mondays and two are Thursdays, and I point out this circumstance, that according to the rules these private members' days take into consideration a normal session which under ordinary circumstances today runs to six months or more.

The first private members' day, Thursday, November 21, was by unanimous consent given over for government business in order to complete the address. The second Thursday was November 28, and this was taken up under public bills, on a bill in respect of industrial relations.

As far as Mondays were concerned, the first Monday was November 25, which was taken up by a private member's motion to instal a system of simultaneous translation in the House of Commons. The second, December 2, was taken up entirely by a motion to extend the hours of sitting, which was debated, and also by the motion of the hon. member for Essex East to adjourn the house on an urgent matter. The third was December 9, which was taken up by a motion respecting the Canadian centennial. The fourth, December 16, was taken up by a motion in respect of increased pensions for some superannuated civil servants. The fifth Monday was January 6 and was taken up by a motion with respect to human rights.

There is only one further day and I would suggest-and I am going to ask for support of this motion-that having regard to all the circumstances and the very important legislation still on the order paper, the house accept this motion. It is not made with any desire to limit private members' days or private members' rights, but I feel sure that hon. members generally will agree that having regard to the time already taken on private members' days within the comparatively short period of this session, the request is a reasonable one, and I present it in that respect.

Topic:   MOTION THAT JANUARY 13 BE A GOVERNMENT DAY
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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Official Opposition House Leader; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Laurier):

Mr. Speaker, following the attitude of co-operation adopted by our leader during the early part of this session we on this side of the house will raise no objection to the adoption of this motion.

Topic:   MOTION THAT JANUARY 13 BE A GOVERNMENT DAY
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, I merely point out that the result of this motion, if it carries, will be to cut out private members' day on this coming Monday with respect to a motion that would have been moved by a backbencher on the government side.

Topic:   MOTION THAT JANUARY 13 BE A GOVERNMENT DAY
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, I see no objection to supporting the motion. It does seem to me that if we are

to finish up the business of this session in a reasonable time we have to do something of the sort.

Topic:   MOTION THAT JANUARY 13 BE A GOVERNMENT DAY
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Motion agreed to.


NATIONAL DEFENCE

NUCLEAR WEAPONS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Sinclair

Liberal

Hon. James Sinclair (Coast-Capilano):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Minister of National Defence but in his absence, since the question is of major importance, I shall direct it to the Prime Minister. Yesterday, as recorded at page 3123 of Hansard, the hon. member for Kingston asked the Minister of National Defence whether United States aircraft were permitted to carry nuclear weapons over Canadian air space. In reply the minister said that occasionally this did happen but that no blanket authority was given, and a specific authority had to be given for each flight.

Is the Prime Minister aware of a story carried in the Toronto Telegram last night originating from Washington, contradicting the situation described by the minister by saying that specific flight permission was not necessary, that the international defence agreement gave them blanket flight authority; and also that far from these flights being occasional they are so frequent that they are regarded as routine? If so, will the Prime Minister reconcile these two conflicting statements?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   NUCLEAR WEAPONS
Sub-subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION BY AIRCRAFT OVER CANADA
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January 11, 1958