January 9, 1958

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

ATLANTIC PROVINCES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Hon. J. W. Pickersgill (Bonavisla-Twil-lingate):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask

the Prime Minister how soon the government expects to introduce the bill to provide for the special grants to the Atlantic provinces, which he announced as part of the business of this session?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC PROVINCES
Sub-subtopic:   INTRODUCTION OF MEASURE PROVIDING GRANTS
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

At the earliest possible date. As

a matter of fact, if progress is made with that expedition we hope to see with regard to the current measures, it will be introduced just as soon as the estimates covering the departments that have been called have received the attention of the house, and one or two other matters that have to be dealt with have received the acceptance of the house.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC PROVINCES
Sub-subtopic:   INTRODUCTION OF MEASURE PROVIDING GRANTS
Permalink
LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

I have a supplementary

question. May I ask the Prime Minister whether it is intended to have these grants made available for the present fiscal year, or whether they will only be available for the fiscal year 1958-59? This is a matter that is, of course, of the greatest possible interest to all provincial treasurers.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC PROVINCES
Sub-subtopic:   INTRODUCTION OF MEASURE PROVIDING GRANTS
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

When the legislation is

introduced the terms will be revealed.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   ATLANTIC PROVINCES
Sub-subtopic:   INTRODUCTION OF MEASURE PROVIDING GRANTS
Permalink

REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

May

I direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce. I ask it in view of the uncertainty he expressed with regard to possible sales of wheat to Australia. I have in my hand the Australian Daily News, an official publication of the Australian government in North America, dated December 13, in which this official statement was made:

Minister for trade John McEwen said today Australia would import 1,500,000 bushels (60 lb. per bushel) of high-protein Canadian wheat for making certain types of bread in Sydney.

He also added:

If it became necessary, more Canadian wheat would be imported-

In view of that official statement of December 13, and the fact that there has been so much confusion on the part of the minister and in other quarters of the house, I wonder whether he has seen this statement before.

Topic:   REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Gordon Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I do not think there is any confusion on the part of the Minister of Trade and Commerce with regard to this matter. The confusion has existed in the minds of my hon. friends.

Topic:   REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

First of all the minister said he had not heard of such a suggestion.

Topic:   REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

I do not recall having made such a statement whatsoever. I said I was fully aware of the situation in Australia with regard to their crop failure and the necessity they might have to import wheat if they wished to maintain their export markets. I also stated that there was no actual shortage of wheat in Australia to sustain their own population.

That would be borne out by the figures which you would find in the Wheat Review. I have the November issue in front of me, and the Australian supply position, as mentioned on page 29, indicates that they had total estimated supplies of 218 million bushels, with total exports of wheat and wheat flour of 92.6 million bushels, leaving a balance on November 3 for export and for carryover of 49.1 million bushels, a sufficient amount of wheat to sustain their population.

The problem facing Australia is to maintain its export position. As I understand the situation, they consider it perhaps advisable to import some Canadian wheat so they could export their Australian wheat to countries with which they have been dealing over the years. On the point as to whether or not it is essential for us to press upon the Australians the fact that we have wheat available for export, may I say that I pointed out yesterday that Australia has been in the wheat business for many years and is one of the four leading exporters of wheat, and that the Australian people in the wheat business are just as familiar with our situation as we are with theirs, because they get constant reports on the availability of supplies. We are prepared to do business with Australia; and the wheat board, I presume,

Inquiries of the Ministry has been in constant consultation with Australian officials. I do not see the difficulty which arises in the mind of my hon. friend.

Topic:   REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

May I ask a supplementary question of the minister. Does he not think in view of this statement that it would have been wise for the Minister of Trade and Commerce to have followed this up, or is he reverting to the policy of a former minister who said it was not the business of the Minister of Trade and Commerce to sell wheat?

I refer, of course, to Mr. Malcolm.

Topic:   REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA
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PC

Gordon Minto Churchill (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

Mr. Speaker, I have been spending a great deal of my time on the problem of how to advance the sale of Canadian wheat, and we are having considerable success in doing so. I am very much interested in the prospect for the sale of wheat to Australia, but I am naturally dependent upon information I receive from the wheat board. The wheat board meets daily, as my hon. friend knows, to consider possible sales, and they are not overlooking any opportunity to make sales of Canadian wheat.

Topic:   REPORTED PURCHASE OF 1,500,000 BUSHELS BY AUSTRALIA
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OIL, LEAD AND ZINC-INQUIRY AS TO STEPS TO PROTECT CANADIAN INTERESTS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Hon. Paul Marlin (Essex East):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Prime Minister, in view of the decision of the government of the United States to curtail to the extent of 15 per cent its imports of oil from Canada, and in view of the story contained in this morning's Globe and Mail about possible action with regard to lead and zinc, if he is in a position to say whether or not the story of last Friday, that he proposed to take steps this week to see the President of the United States, is true. Is he in a position to tell us what additional protests the government of Canada is making?

Topic:   OIL, LEAD AND ZINC-INQUIRY AS TO STEPS TO PROTECT CANADIAN INTERESTS
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I do not intend to comment on any newspaper story that I have not read or seen. I can simply say this, that we intend to place this question before the United States administration very definitely and very clearly, and we have already taken steps in that direction, pointing out that in the interest of our common defence, if nothing else, action such as this should be carefully considered with all its implications.

Topic:   OIL, LEAD AND ZINC-INQUIRY AS TO STEPS TO PROTECT CANADIAN INTERESTS
Permalink
LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Mr. Martin (Essex East):

May I ask a supplementary question. In view of the assurance given by the Minister of Finance last Friday or Saturday, I forget which day, has a formal note of protest been sent as yet by the government?

Topic:   OIL, LEAD AND ZINC-INQUIRY AS TO STEPS TO PROTECT CANADIAN INTERESTS
Permalink

January 9, 1958