November 1, 1957

LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Mr. Martin (Essex East):

No manipulation of words by the Prime Minister will change this fact, that every bit of social legislation on the statute books of our country, with the exception of the increase of the federal share of old age pensions in 1932, was placed there by a government under Mackenzie King or Louis St. Laurent.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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PC

Howard Charles Green (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

Don't forget your $6 increase.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Mr. Martin (Essex East):

Be careful about this business of indirect closure. Don't prevent a man from speaking in this house. Remember the rights of parliament can be violated by thwarting discussion.

Disabled Persons Act

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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PC

Clayton Wesley Hodgson (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Public Works)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hodgson:

You are a past master at it.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Mr. Martin (Essex East):

This is exactly the kind of situation I like. The Prime Minister is a man for whom I have personally the highest regard, as he knows. We exchanged pleasantries at 2.30 p.m. in another room and he said that that did not preclude us from taking serious issue. I take issue with the Prime Minister now. Commendable as he is as a gentleman, I cannot help but admire but at the same time deplore the tactics which he so often employs-and employed particularly in recent months-of giving to the nation the impression that at long last we have a real sponsor of social legislation in this country, when the fact is, Mr. Chairman-

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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PC

George Harris Hees (Minister of Transport)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Hees:

The hon. member never spoke better.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Mr. Martin (Essex East):

-that not one bit of legislation in the social welfare field, outside of these amendments, can be attributed to the party of which my hon. friend is the head at this time, and no matter how uncomfortable he may find these statements, they are facts.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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PC

Howard Charles Green (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Progressive Conservative Party House Leader)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

They are not.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin

Liberal

Mr. Martin (Essex East):

And with no amount of manipulation on his part will he ever be able to deny it.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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CCF

William Scottie Bryce

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Bryce:

Mr. Chairman, the Disabled Persons Act is an act in which I have been interested for a long time. In fact, on different occasions during the last parliament I complained to the then minister of national health and welfare about the administration of the act in the different provinces of Canada. The minister at that time assured me that the regulations were the same in all provinces. I have visited the 10 provinces of Canada and from what I have seen I am not satisfied with his statement because I found great differences. Every province has its own idea on the administration of the Disabled Persons Act. In some provinces the only persons who can benefit from this act are the ones who are either confined to bed or those who are unable to put on their own clothes or feed themselves.

In my travels I have met people who are able to do these things but at the same time they are too disabled to earn a living. Of course, differences in administration of the act are to be expected because each province has its own panel of doctors who may interpret the clauses of the act in a different way. One of the drawbacks of this act is the fact that it is a federal statute but administered by the provinces. When speaking on

Disabled Persons Act

this matter before in the house I have suggested that it might be a good idea to have a meeting of all the doctors who sit on the medical boards in each different province. The outcome of their discussion might help in enabling each province to administer this act in the same way.

Another matter I should like to draw to the minister's attention regarding the Disabled Persons Act is where-

The Depuly Chairman: Order.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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CCF

William Scottie Bryce

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Bryce:

I will be only a couple of minutes. May I have the unanimous consent of the committee to continue.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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?

Some hon. Members:

Go ahead.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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CCF

William Scottie Bryce

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Bryce:

Thank you. Another matter I should like to draw to the minister's attention regarding the Disabled Persons Act is where the province attempts to find work for a disabled person or teach him a trade in which to earn his livelihood. In some cases, after a trial of about three months, it is found that they are not fitted for work of any kind. Sustained employment for three months is necessary to determine whether strain of full employment is too much for the disabled person. However, while employed for these three months or so the disabled person must disqualify himself from receiving his allowance under the Disabled Persons Act. The risk of losing the allowance as well as the lack of certainty of the handicapped person's ability to continue employment on a full-time basis deters any handicapped person from attempting to become self-supporting. Would it not be possible for the minister to amend the act so that a person could get his pension while he is trying to establish himself and make his own living? As it is at present, immediately he starts to work his pension stops, but if it proves that his work is too much for his state of disability he has to apply again to the board to be reinstated under the Disabled Persons Act.

This may take three or four months before he gets a hearing by the board and he loses his pension in the meantime.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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PC

Arza Clair Casselman (Deputy Chair of Committees of the Whole)

Progressive Conservative

The Deputy Chairman:

Shall the resolution carry?

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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SC

Frederick Davis Shaw

Social Credit

Mr. Shaw:

I have something I want to say but it is five o'clock.

Progress reported.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
Permalink
PC

Daniel Roland Michener (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Speaker:

It being five o'clock, the house will now proceed to the consideration of public bills and orders.

Topic:   DISABLED PERSONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING ALLOWANCE AND ALLOWABLE INCOME
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CANADA ELECTIONS ACT

AMENDMENT RESPECTING PRINTING OF BALLOT PAPERS

SC

Ray Thomas

Social Credit

Mr. Ray Thomas (Wetaskiwin) moved

the second reading of Bill No. 12, to amend the Canada Elections Act (ballot papers).

He said: Mr. Speaker, as I indicated on first reading of the bill, I have introduced this measure on a number of occasions before. Therefore I will be very brief in what I have to say because those hon. members who were here during the last parliament will be quite familiar with it and I will just say a few words by way of explanation to those who may not be familiar with the history of the measure.

The bill has two provisions. The first is to put the political affiliation of the candidate on the ballot paper. The purpose of the second is to provide that the leader of any of the political groups in the country can, if there is any doubt, send or give a letter to the returning officer indicating which of the candidates in any constituency is the official representative of the particular political party.

During the course of the debates in the last few years when I have brought this measure before the house it has been pointed out that we are not elected to the House of Commons as members of political groups but as representatives of the people of Canada and therefore political affiliation should not be taken into consideration. I think that is a rather weak argument because if hon. members will look at the seating plan of the house they will find that each of the groups in the house is definitely designated according to political affiliation. They will find also if they look at the back pages of Hansard each Wednesday that the political affiliation of every member of the house is shown in the list of members.

Whether or not we want to admit it, Canada does have a party system. Each candidate as he goes into an election does so duly nominated by his political party. He goes into the campaign on the hustings as the representative of that political party regardless of the fact that no mention of his political affiliation is made on the ballot or nomination papers. In checking the Parliamentary Guide through the years I have found numerous instances-hon. members will find that the same thing was true on June 10 last-where in past elections some of the parties have felt they did not have a chance to win a particular constituency and have deliberately gone out and selected a candidate with a name either identical to or very similar to that of the candidate whom they hoped to defeat.

When I introduced the bill last session one argument put forward against the bill was that if a man were sent to the House of Commons as the representative of a political group it might stand in his way if he wanted to cross the floor or change from the government side to the opposition side or vice versa. I should like to point out that within recent times we have had a very good example of that and apparently the fact that this person was in the house as a member of a certain party did not make a bit of difference because when he made his statement about changing he said that he was changing from one party to another.

There is only one more point I wish to raise. There are provinces in Canada which have adopted the policy of accepting the fact that we do have party politics in this country and have placed the political affiliation of candidates on ballot papers. It has worked out very well. In order to save confusion in the future, I think the best thing that we in the House of Commons can do is to adopt a practice which has been accepted and found wholly adequate in some of the provinces and thus, where there might be confusion, give the people the opportunity to know which candidate represents the party for which they would like to vote.

Topic:   CANADA ELECTIONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT RESPECTING PRINTING OF BALLOT PAPERS
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CCF

Harold Edward Winch

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Harold E. Winch (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, I most certainly am strongly in favour of the bill which has now been introduced. The practice of putting the party affiliation of the candidate on ballot papers has been in effect in the province of British Columbia for a great many years.

Topic:   CANADA ELECTIONS ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT RESPECTING PRINTING OF BALLOT PAPERS
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November 1, 1957