October 21, 1957

LIB

James Allen (Jim) Byrne

Liberal

Mr. Byrne:

A short hope.

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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Argue:

He almost made it, too.

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PC

Hayden Stanton

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanton:

I spoke in the same debate a few days later, and on page 282 of Hansard of January 15, 1957, it will be found that I said:

With your indulgence, Mr. Speaker, I should like to make a few prophecies, and I do not believe that I will have to go too far out on the limb in doing so. I prophesy that the Social Credit party will not elect a member east of the Manitoba border, and that nearly all their candidates will lose their deposits. I will also make a prophecy that they will not elect a member east of the Alberta border. ... I will make one more prediction and it is this. The good people of the constituency of Prince Albert will have a third prime minister of Canada as their representative after the next election.

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SC

Ernest George Hansell

Social Credit

Mr. Hansell:

You are a good prophet; much better than I am.

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PC

Hayden Stanton

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Stanton:

May I say, Mr. Speaker, that before the hon. member for Macleod makes any more predictions perhaps he should change the lenses in his glasses so he will be able to look into the crystal ball a little more accurately, because his predictions were just as accurate as the Gallup 96698-13J

The Address-Mr. Mclvor poll or those found in the editorial in Maclean's magazine published the day after

the election.

I would also suggest to my hon. friends to my right that while they are all good fellows and we enjoy seeing them there, perhaps they had better change their political thinking. If they do not do so, then after the next election they will probably be moved across the way because there will be no desks left for them on this side of the house. They will all be occupied by Conservative members.

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LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. Daniel Mclvor (Fort William):

Mr. Speaker, I have not my notes before me, but no man should stand in this house unless he has sufficient to say that he can speak without notes. I congratulate you, Sir, because I am sure you will do your duty as Deputy Speaker. I shall defend both the Speaker and Deputy Speaker, just as I was willing to defend the former Speaker from any incursions from any source. I congratulate the new members. They have a splendid opportunity to do something for Canada. I hope their eyes will not be blinded by narrow politics or selfishness.

I should like also to welcome the page boys, because they are very important to this house. I hope that this year, as in a former year under a Liberal administration, the page boys will get a trip to some place that is worthy of their responsibilities. I should like to congratulate the government whip. He was very kind to me. Generally when a man is told to go up higher it means a promotion. However, when he said to me, through our whip, "Stay where you are", that meant a promotion for old Dan. I appreciate it very much. I think the real reason I was left in that office was that the whip wanted a youth with red blood in his veins to pep up the old P.C.'s on that floor.

I congratulate the government upon two things that are contained in the speech from the throne. I feel the proposal to increase war veterans pensions is good. I feel this move is to be commended, and we should give honour to whom honour is due. However, there is something that has been omitted from the speech from the throne insofar as the veteran is concerned, namely old age pensions commencing at 60 years of age for those who served in an active theatre, without a means test. I spoke of this during the last four years. Last year I mentioned that one man had had four Christmas dinners, in the trenches. Another man was assigned to the trenches where there was not a dry spot on the ground, and he was kept there for 31 days without a dry sock on his foot.

The Address-Mr. Mclvor No one can tell me that this is not injurious to a man's health and to his chances of longevity. I am sure the Minister of Veterans Affairs will take this into consideration, because he has spoken of it before.

Another thing that is contained in the speech from the throne, and for which I commend the government, is the proposal to increase old age pensions. I spoke on this subject last year.

There are two good things that are not mentioned in the speech from the throne, and one is health insurance. In 1937 I introduced a resolution on this subject which received the support of the former member for St. Boniface, now Senator Howden. We had a full dress debate on health insurance then, and last year the former minister of national health and welfare got a bill through the house. I am sorry to find that the Conservative government apparently does not intend to implement this measure.

Another omission from the speech from the throne, and something which received the support of the present Minister of Veterans Affairs last year, is adequate pensions for retired civil servants. I said during the debate on my resolution that a man who has worked ten hours a day six days a week has the right to a pension as good as that of the man who works eight hours a day five days a week. This is one of the outstanding things, an increased pension for retired civil servants.

There is another matter about which I want to speak, but before I do so I want to say that the people at the head of the lakes felt that one of the reasons for the change on June 10 was the need for a stronger opposition. Well, if you have not got it now, you will never get it. We have a strong opposition on this side, and the Prime Minister knows it very well. The question that is in my mind is, how can a weak opposition make a strong government? That is a question hon. members opposite will have to consider. I wish them success in the way they deserve.

At the lakehead we have a large harbour in Thunder bay, perhaps the largest in Canada. Delegations have been coming from Manitoba and other areas outside of the lakehead to tell us that we should get the lakehead harbour ready to receive the big ships that will come from the ocean. I should like to tell you, Mr. Speaker, that the man who looked after the lakehead harbour knew what he was doing. He was one of the greatest men Canada produced, Right Hon. C. D. Howe. For 22 years he looked after that harbour and there was never any complaint. There are long docks for both railways, and

the area in front of them is now dredged to a depth of 27 feet. There are long docks in front of the elevators, and the area in front of these docks is dredged deeply enough to receive the big boats from the ocean. We have four paper mills, and the water in front of them is deep enough to receive oceangoing vessels. For 22 years boats have been coming in and going out from these dock facilities without objection from the railways, industries or even the labour unions.

I should like to add, Mr. Speaker, that any request that came through me from the city council of Fort William for more harbour facilities was considered favourably. We got a new harbour for the fishermen at Squaw bay, and that was greatly appreciated because it helped the fishermen in handling their fish. We have a new breakwater at Chippewa in order to protect an area for the children, tourists and others who come there. The last request sent to the former minister of trade and commerce and finally to the Minister of Public Works was for a large dock in the centre of the city, marine harbour. It was a 280-foot dock. I would say to those who are anxious about dock facilities at the lakehead that they were well looked after during the last 22 years.

When the present Minister of Transport called on us a little while ago, I toured the harbour with him. He did a god job. He told us he was not stating now what was going to be done, that he was merely on a fact-finding tour. I must say it gave me great pleasure to introduce my former baseball catcher to the lakehead aristocracy. I believe he appreciated it. Fort William harbour is well looked after.

Somebody from Winnipeg said that Duluth was spending $40 million. The chairman of our harbour board, who knows very well what our harbour contains, says that if you had to put in the present equipment it would cost you $300 million or more. I would therefore say that our harbour is in good shape. However, our city council has wisely advised that before any money is spent on our harbour a full investigation should be made. I am looking to the Minister of Transport to see that that investigation is carried out. The hon. member for Port Arthur (Mr. Fisher) has asked for such an investigation. We are asking for it so we shall be fit to receive the big boats that come from overseas,

Mr. Speaker, I should like to say a word about the hub of Canada. It is agreed at the lakehead that Fort William is the hub oi Canada. The Prime Minister, when he sees more of it, will agree with me. Fort William is growing rapidly. Just imagine what has taken place. The Great Lakes Pulp anc

Paper Company, with its two large mills, has now doubled its capacity. Two new paper mills have been built at an expenditure of more than $40 million. It is the greatest paper manufacturing company in Canada today.

We therefore lift our heads high. We are proud of the new man who came from Quebec to take over the Great Lakes Pulp and Paper Company mill as superintendent. I refer to Mr. Fox. I pay my tribute to him as an outstanding businessman, well able to take care of the workers in a harmonious way. The Abitibi Power and Paper Company has also spent a large sum of money. But one of the things that pleases me best at the lakehead is the situation at the Canadian Car and Foundry Company. Last year we announced to the then minister of labour that they had had two million hours without an accident. They are now fairly well into the third million hours without an accident. I am extremely happy to represent the hub of Canada in this respect.

I think that is all I have to say. I should just like to conclude by saying that I am not looking forward tb an election this year. I am going to support the speech from the throne because I do not think the government yet has done enough for us to pass a vote of non-confidence. It is true that they promised to have a session of parliament in September, but any man who has a garden, as I have, would not like to have a session in September, so he changed the date. However, I was not so glad when I was criticized for saying so at the lakehead by the old age pensioners.

The hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) did not agree with the reasons given by the Prime Minister for extending the date. I was glad that we were not called before October 14 for that selfish reason I have mentioned. I think the government should be given the opportunity to make good on its promises of cutting taxes and raising pensions all round. Let us give them a chance to make good. That is what I want. When I was engaged in the manly art, I remember that I liked to have a chance to show whether or not I could handle myself. I should like the government to have a chance to show whether or not they are able to handle themselves and to measure up to the task confronting them.

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SC

Frank Claus Christian

Social Credit

Mr. F. C. Christian (Okanagan Boundary):

Mr. Speaker, as the hon. member for Okanagan Boundary I should like to congratulate you, as Deputy Speaker, and Mr. Speaker on being elevated to the positions which you now occupy. I am sure you will

The Address-Mr. Christian carry out the duties of your offices with every efficiency and dispatch. Coming into this house as, if I may say so, the tallest rookie, I am happy to see the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Green) sitting in the seat he occupies and holding the position he now holds, as he hails from Vancouver-Quadra. In that particular area he is held in high esteem, as he is throughout the Dominion of Canada. I think it is only proper for a new member of the house to recognize the merit of other hon. members, no matter to what party they belong. I appreciate the fact that in this House of Commons today on both sides of the house are men of great ability. I think it is the duty of these men, as well as of all members of this house, to try to carry on the government of this country as efficiently and as ably as they possibly can.

The hon. member who preceded me mentioned Fort William and described it as the hub of Canada. I would say there is another hub of Canada known as the Okanagan Boundary area. It is sometimes called the California of Canada by many people. Nevertheless, like the rest of the people of this great Canada of ours, we have our problems there also. Basically our industries consist of farming, ranching, mining and logging. In addition there is also the tourist industry. The farmer complains because he is not getting a sufficiently high price for his products. Similarly the rancher complains because the price of beef has come down substantially. In our particular area a number of mines actually have been closed down. The small logger also is bitterly complaining because he cannot get a proper price for his logs. That is the situation which exists.

May I say this respectfully. Having been in this house for the short time I have been here, I feel that there should be less and less of politics in this House of Commons and that we should come as Canadians, trying to assist our government. I feel that we should try to rise above personalities and obstructionist methods. Let us try to get things done for the Canadian people.

I commend the government of this country for having the foresight and zeal to try to stabilize the prices of agricultural products. As to the matter of cash advances against the farm-stored grain, I think the principle is good and I personally am going to support it. However, I would say this. While cash advances to prairie farmers will be in the nature of an emergency measure, after all it is a temporary expedient. I think there is one danger, namely that sometimes these temporary expedients can develop into matters of a permanent nature. It may very well

The Address-Mr. Christian be that when some of the hon. members of this House of Commons later on go back to their respective constituencies the people there-as, for example, in my own constituency of Okanagan Boundary-will say, "When are we going to get cash advances on our apples?" or "When are we going to get cash advances on our various fruits?" However, in this particular case, so far as the prairie farmers are concerned, I think a definite case is made out and that we are dealing here with an emergency. But I certainly hope that this matter is and will be treated as being in the nature of a temporary expedient.

As to a national development policy, I again commend the government. It is about time, and I think the government saw this, that the Dominion of Canada and the provincial governments throughout this great Canada worked together to develop this nation. There is only one suggestion that I should like to make. As I came from the Okanagan valley down here to Ottawa I could not help being impressed for the first time by all the land that is idle and not being used in this great dominion.

I think it would be a good thing if we, the government and everyone concerned, tried to bring about decentralization of industry throughout this Canada of ours. Why, after all, should the industries of this country be concentrated in the large cities? Some day there may be an emergency, and we might be very sorry that industry is concentrated in this manner. Would it not be much wiser if industry were distributed more evenly over this land? If this were done the results would also be helpful to smaller communities such as the Okanagan valley, for example, where we can and do welcome new industries into our midst. Basically we are a fruit growing centre, but if we had industry established there the economy of the whole area would be improved.

Having mentioned the subject of farming I would like to say, Mr. Speaker, that the farmers in the Okanagan valley are not happy, and I would like in particular to bring one matter of importance to the attention of this house. The fruit growers in the valley are keenly disappointed over the federal government's failure to establish a minimum fair market value for prunes to protect against distress quotations and imports. The tariff committee of the British Columbia fruit growers' association supplied to the Minister of Finance data published by the United States department of agriculture on the price of prunes in the three northwest prune-producing states, Idaho, Washington and Oregon, over an eight-year period from 1949 to 1956,

The Address-Mr. Christian this particular case, and I hope the governor in council, pursuant to section 656 of the Crimal Code, will give this matter earnest consideration.

I wish to conclude by briefly dealing with the question of the tight money policy. I noticed in the throne speech there was nothing whatever mentioned with regard to this policy. I heard the leader of the C.C.F., I believe yesterday, mention that he did not think a solution to our problems could be brought about by a change in monetary policy.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

Mr. Speaker, might I say immediately that if the hon. member will read my speech he will find that I did not say that.

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SC

Frank Claus Christian

Social Credit

Mr. Christian:

What did you say, may I ask?

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

I said a change in monetary policy was no solution to the general economic problem.

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SC

Frank Claus Christian

Social Credit

Mr. Christian:

Well, that is basically how we differ. We say there must be a change in the monetary policy of this country, because as a result of the tight money policy we can see evidence today of things levelling off. Times are not as good as they have been, and this winter we can expect to see increased unemployment in Canada.

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CCF

Harold Edward Winch

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Winch:

Under the government you now support.

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SC

Frank Claus Christian

Social Credit

Mr. Christian:

There is a beginning to

everything.

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CCF

Harold Edward Winch

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Winch:

Also an end, thank God.

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SC

Frank Claus Christian

Social Credit

Mr. Christian:

In the course of time the Canadian people will realize that the monetary policy of this country is not what it should be. What party in this house today is trying to improve our own monetary policy?

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CCF

Harold Edward Winch

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Winch:

The C.C.F.

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SC

Frank Claus Christian

Social Credit

Mr. Christian:

The Social Credit party is attempting to give leadership in that regard. Let me read to the hon. member for Vancouver East (Mr. Winch) something that has been said by one of the greatest Liberals we ever had in Canada, Right Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King, which appears in the September 1957 issue of The Canadian Social Creditor:

The Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King, prior to the election of 1935 which returned the Liberal party to power said: "I plead for a sweeping Liberal

majority in order to carry out my policy of public control of currency and credit. Until the control of currency and credit is restored to the government ... all talk of the sovereignty of parliament and democracy is idle and futile".

Those words were spoken by one of the greatest Liberals we have had in Canada. After all, it is the people of this country who are the supreme authority, and they should control the country's monetary policy. When that policy does not work to the satisfaction of the Canadian people then the Social Credit party, the Liberal party, the Conservative party and even the C.C.F. party should put their shoulders behind the wheel and examine our financial institutions to see if they are working for the benefit of the citizens of Canada. We cannot assume that any existing condition is working perfectly and in high order. Let us scrutinize our monetary policy and observe it in the future with a watchful eye to see that it meets the needs of the existing situation.

The leader of the C.C.F. party mentioned that a serious world problem today is underconsumption. We are able to produce ample goods in Canada, but unfortunately many Canadians cannot get the goods and services they require. This situation exists under the tight money policy. Is it not reasonable, therefore, to put the finest financial minds in Canada to work on the problem in order to bring about a solution that will benefit all Canadian people? Thank you, Mr. Speaker.

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PC

Arthur Edward Martin Maloney (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Labour)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Arthur Maloney (Parkdale):

Mr. Speaker, I rise in this distinguished house with the emotions that we are told inevitably accompany this event when it occurs for the first time in the life of a parliamentarian. I will be excused, I know, if at the outset I make what you may feel to be a personal reference when I refer to my late father, Dr. Martin James Maloney, who sat in this house from 1925 until 1935 and three of whose colleagues still remain, the hon. member for Grenville-Dundas (Mr. Casselman), the hon. member for York East (Mr. McGregor) and the hon. member for Dufferin-Simcoe (Mr. Rowe). If on leaving this place, Mr. Speaker, either voluntarily or by the settled design of my constituents, I can boast of having served this house, my constituents and my fellow Canadians with the same loyalty and devotion he did, and if I can boast of having earned the affectionate good will of all hon. members in this chamber regardless of their political affiliation, then I shall leave with the same feeling of satisfaction I know he enjoyed. It is rather significant that I should have taken my seat for the first time on October 14, 1957, 22 years to the day from October 14, 1935, when he was defeated as the representative for South Renfrew.

Now, Mr. Speaker, as someone whom my colleagues from Toronto will confirm has had in his professional career not a little to do

with the criminal law, naturally I scanned the faces of the hon. members opposite with a great deal of curiosity on opening day, and in fairness I must assure my colleagues on this side of the house that I have never encountered any of them in my professional capacity.

I want to thank the Prime Minister for the honour he conferred upon me when he invited me to be the parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Labour. The duties of the office, I shall attempt to discharge to the very best of my ability, and I should like at this moment to say what pleasure it gives me to attempt to serve the Minister of Labour even in that humble capacity. The Minister of Labour, with a long background of experience has, in my opinion, a natural understanding of the problems with which his department is daily concerned; and in my observations of the operations of the department under his supervision I am satisfied that he will in a very short time be regarded as one of the finest incumbents that office has ever had.

I should like to join with the speakers who have preceded me, Mr. Speaker, in the congratulations that they extended to you and to the Deputy Speaker, and I should like also to add my congratulations to those that have already been extended to the hon. member for Calgary South (Mr. Smith) and the hon. member for Bonaventure (Mr. Arsenault) for the addresses they gave at the commencement of this debate.

I am aware, Mr. Speaker, that on this occasion it is customary for members to discuss some of the particular features and, of course, the needs of their constituencies. In the case of my riding, Parkdale, I am sure it is well known to the members of this house through the efforts of the illustrious members who have preceded me. I should like to say a few words about the people of my riding. Parkdale is a fair cross section of Canada. In addition to a stalwart Anglo-Saxon group of slightly in excess of 50 per cent, virtually all of the ethnic groups of Europe are also represented, including the Baltic peoples, Byelorussians, Hungarians, Italians, Germans, Croatians, Serbs, Czechs, Slovaks and the largest groups the Poles and Ukrainians.

I would like to make just a few comments about these newcomers. These lately arrived people are proudly aware of the traditions of our country and are eager to participate in its forward movement. They make an invaluable contribution to Canada's future promise. In the same way as did many of our forefathers some came to this country for adventure, some for freedom, but freedom was the spur which drove most of them here. Having 96698-14

The Address-Mr. Maloney found freedom they have a strong determination not to give it up, and they have an abiding desire to assist the enslaved peoples in their own home lands to regain theirs. It is this devotion to freedom, Mr. Speaker, exemplified as it is by so many of the people in my riding, which in my opinion is the bedrock on which all our future hopes must necessarily be founded.

Recently, in a speech at McGill University, the Prime Minister referred to the challenge presented to the free world by the launching of the Soviet satellite which, according to the news reports, is now circling the world at the unimaginable velocity of 18,000 miles an hour. On the occasion of that address the Prime Minister said:

The free world will get nowhere by resorting to fear nor will it meet the challenge by the spirit of apathy based on defeatism.

I believe these are words, Mr. Speaker, with which every member in this house will agree. The Prime Minister's remarks on that occasion emphasized the great central defect of the Soviet system, a defect for which no number of satellites, no number of intercontinental missiles, no display of military or scientific achievement can compensate. That is, of course, the total and complete absence of freedom under its operation.

We know that under the Soviet system matters which we take for granted-free parliaments, free press, free trade unions, are unknown. The Soviet union is able to offer guns but not freedom. This is so in China, in Egypt, in the Philippines and now in Syria, where the Soviet union does not offer freedom, only arms. It is not unexpected, with its record of subornation of freedom, that the proudest scientific achievement of the Soviet union should have been the production of a satellite.

I commend to this house, Mr. Speaker, the United Nations report on the Soviet intervention in Hungary. There was Soviet freedom at its very finest. Another case is Poland, where the urge for freedom, the strongest urge of man, again is beginning to make itself increasingly evident. This, Mr. Speaker, is a great challenge to the Soviet monolith, the spirit of freedom which constantly manifests itself among the tragic peoples she oppresses and will continue to do so until, as we hope, it overcomes slavery and bondage.

The newcomers to Parkdale and the newcomers to Canada, besides helping to enrich our culture, bring to us a practical and often personal experience, and the experience as well of their friends and their relatives of days and nights of agony that are incomprehensible to us who have never felt the horror of the almighty state. Were I to bring

The Address-Mr. Maloney before this house the tribulations of the Polish people represented in my riding, the Hungarian people who are also represented, the Baltic peoples, the Ukrainian peoples, and the other peoples of the states of central and eastern Europe, peoples who have experienced at first hand the barbarities of the Soviet system, I am sure I would obtain the universal sympathy of this house.

The evil of communism feeds and fosters on disaster and decay. Excessive material hardship and moral decline are the breeding ground of communism. It is my hope that in international affairs our country will continue to raise its voice on the side of the weak and the oppressed1, and that in our own affairs we shall continually strive to provide our citizens with such a standard of living as will render ineffective what has elsewhere proven to be the sometimes attractive argument of the communists.

The people to whom I have been referring came variously from countries in Europe between which there often were traditionally historical animosities and hostilities. In this country these hostilities are beginning to disappear. One of the reasons that accounts for their disappearance is the mutual anxiety they entertain about their own oppressed fellow countrymen. This has served to create a bond between them which constitutes a firm foundation for friendship and harmony in this country. These people teach us that Russia, in order to achieve her ambitions, counts on the tolerance of the peoples of the western world and counts upon disunity among the free nations of the world. They would have us believe that understanding and co-operation with soviet Russia are mere illusions, and indeed many of them go the length of suggesting to us such a drastic measure as the breaking off of diplomatic relations between the democracies of the world and what they describe as "the criminal regime in Moscow".

Today the tragic peoples who are enslaved in Europe look forward out of their present darkness toward a future in which they will witness the removal from the face of their home lands every last vestige of the disfigurement which was wrought upon them by the bolshevik conqueror. After his release from confinement last October and during the course of his New Year's message to the Polish people, His Eminence Stephan Cardinal Wyszynsky said:

I wish to everyone patience as in patience you will be masters of your souls.

Those were words of hopeful advice to his own people and to the other peoples of central and eastern Europe. It was a tribute to this country that so many of these outstanding

people should have chosen Canada as the country of their adoption and yet, on reflection, Canada really furnishes a natural setting for people of diverse ethnic origins.

Almost 300 years ago there commenced the process of two diverse races, each with ancient and different cultures, each with different attitudes and outlooks, living side by side. Differences of race and of religion were duly recognized and we were able to find a common ground in respect of our system of government. This country, then, furnishes a natural setting for the people to whom I have been referring.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, it is most gratifying indeed to me to address a few words to this hon. house in its other official language.

It was a source of very great pleasure, Mr. Speaker, for me to observe, as a newly elected member, that differences of opinion in political matters do not prevent the formation of friendships among hon. members of this house even though they belong to opposing political parties. I should like at this stage to follow the leadership of the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefenbaker) who the other day paid tribute to the present Leader of the Opposition (Mr. St. Laurent, Quebec East). It is a source of regret that the right hon. member proposes to resign from the leadership of his party after a new leader has been selected to replace him. For me, and I know for all newly elected members, it will be a proud boast always that we served as members of the house contemporaneously with the Leader of the Opposition.

Differences of political opinion on specific matters have not in any way minimized the esteem in which the distinguished right hon. gentleman is held. In serving now as Leader of the Opposition destiny is conferring upon him the same privilege it conferred upon two of his distinguished predecessors, Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir Wilfrid Laurier.

I am of the belief that our nation is a greater nation because of the historical association of two great races of people, the English and the French. They have lived side by side, more often than not, in harmony and good will. Out of this association has developed a nationality which not only makes us a more interesting country in the eyes of the world but an example in tolerance and understanding.

At the moment on this side of the house there are not as many representatives of my French Canadian friends as I should like to see, but in the expectation that when the first opportunity presents itself this situation will be corrected we are holding in reserve as

many as 50 places to accommodate the newcomers. In the meantime, it will be the proud privilege of all of us on this side of the house to see to it that the ancient rights and privileges of French Canada are jealously maintained and safeguarded.

(Text):

It was a source of very great pleasure, Mr. Speaker, for me to observe, as a newly elected member, that differences of opinion in political matters do not prevent the formation of friendships among hon. members of this house even though they belong to opposing political parties. I should like at this stage to follow the leadership of the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefenbaker) who the other day paid tribute to the present Leader of the Opposition (Mr. St. Laurent). It is a source of regret that the right hon. member proposes to resign from the leadership of his party after a new leader has been selected to replace him. For me, and I know for all newly elected members, it will be a proud boast always that we served as members of the house contemporaneously with the Leader of the Opposition.

Differences of political opinion on specific matters have not in any way minimized the esteem in which the distinguished right hon. gentleman is held. In serving now as Leader of the Opposition destiny is conferring upon him the same privilege it conferred upon two of his distinguished predecessors, Sir John A. Macdonald and Sir Wilfrid Laurier.

I am of the belief that our nation is a greater nation because of the historical association of two great races of people, the English and the French. They have lived side by side, more often than not, in harmony and good will. Out of this association has developed a nationality which makes us, not only a more interesting country in the eyes of the world but an example in tolerance and understanding.

At the moment on this side of the house there are not as many representatives of my French Canadian friends as I should like to see, but, in the expectation that when the first opportunity presents itself this situation will be corrected we are holding in reserve as many as 50 places to accommodate the newcomers. In the meantime, it will be the proud privilege of all of us on this side of the house to see to it that the ancient rights and privileges of French Canada are jealously maintained and safeguarded.

In attempting to understand what is embodied in the concept "Canadianism", sometimes that can be done by means of an experiment. If you were to try to exclude from your understanding of Canadianism some of the glories of French Canada, the historic sites of Montreal, ancient Quebec, Ste. Anne de 96698-14J

The Address-Mr. Caron Beaupre, St. Joseph's Oratory, how sombre the result would be. By the same token, by the same process, if you were to exclude from the ambit of what you understand to be Canadianism British Columbia, the prairies, Toronto, the maritimes, the tenth province, the result would be equally disheartening.

Canadianism then is of necessity as well as of desire a concept from which neither can possibly be excluded.

I hope that, however long or short my career in this place may be, I shall never utter a single syllable that will in any way interfere with the steady progress of our march towards national unity.

I was impressed on June 10 with the national character of our party. I was impressed with the support it received from all quarters. The support we got knew no boundaries of race, of class or of creed. We were supported by the poor people; we were supported by the rich people. We were supported by workingmen; we were supported by the people who hire them. We were supported by the English; we were supported by the French. We were supported by the Protestant, the Catholic and the Jew. We were supported by every group, every race and every class, in other words, we proved ourselves to be what others might sometimes suggest we are not; we proved ourselves to be a truly national party, the party of all the people in this country.

Finally, Mr. Speaker, I am proud to subscribe to the national development program initiated by my party and already foreshadowed in measures announced in the speech from the throne. The surveying and development of the Canadian north, the erection of projects to facilitate the extraction of our vast resources, the processing and control of these resources in Canada, are all projects which cannot but commend themselves to fellow Canadians. I may say, that it is with pride that as a member of my party I have witnessed the alacrity with which the Prime Minister and the new government have proceeded to translate these programs into effective measures.

The measures of social welfare too, Mr. Speaker, will greatly assist the aged and needy in my riding and throughout our nation. They are deeply welcomed and are prophetic of a successful administration which will bring together the conflicting forces of this country and all this, in a way that will best serve the interests of its people.

(Translation):

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LIB

Alexis Pierre Caron

Liberal

Mr. Alexis Caron (Hull):

May I ask you, at the beginning of my remarks, to be so kind as to express on my behalf the usual congratulations to Mr. Speaker on this particular

The Address-Mr. Caron occasion. I saw him in this house at a time when all we heard was of trouble and difficulties; I saw him when some members trooped toward the Speaker shaking their fists; I saw him then remain seated and very calmly wait until the storm had died down. He therefore showed at that time that he had all the qualifications required to adequately fulfil the role which is given him today. I was glad also to note-I did not know it before-that he handles the French language with wonderful ease. This, in my opinion, is essential for a Speaker of the House of Commons in Ottawa, where both languages are official, and both races represented.

I should like also to congratulate you, Mr. Deputy Speaker, for having been appointed chairman of the committees of the house. I feel the choice has been a very wise one, since you already have a good parliamentary training, having sat here for many years; moreover, you are known as a good lawyer, which will help you analyse and properly construe the rules and regulations; you are also conversant with both official languages of this country, and I am convinced that you will always be able to replace the Speaker with dignity, should he be absent from the house.

(Text):

I should like to offer my congratulations to the mover of the address, the hon. member for Calgary South (Mr. Smith). He has spoken in this house with all the characteristics of a perfect orator. I was not a member of this house when his illustrious father was a member, but I am told he is following in the footsteps of that hon. member, and if that is so he will prove to be one of the best members of this house.

(Translation):

I also want to commend the hon. member for Bonaventure (Mr. Arsenault) who expressed himself admirably in both languages. A member's maiden speech in this house is always the hardest to deliver. However, he got along splendidly.

Of course, he will learn in time that issues discussed here are generally federal issues. Provincial rights can also be mentioned, but my hon. friend will soon realize that, in this house, we mostly discuss problems under federal jurisdiction. However, he has done wonderfully well, and I wish him the best of luck.

I also would like to congratulate the previous speaker on the magnificent way he spoke French. We noted that his was not French of the written sort, spoken by rote. He has a good command of French, and he proved it. Even if I do not share all his

views, I have to commend him and I trust that some other members will try to address this house in both our country's official languages.

I seize the opportunity of my first speech in this new parliament to thank the voters of my riding who were kind enough to return me to the house. In this last struggle, I had to cope with the united efforts of all those who dislike liberalism. A so-called independent Liberal candidate was put up, but this was done in the office of the Union Nationale in Quebec on February 7 last.

In spite of the concerted efforts of the supporters of this party and the money they spent, the people of Hull have recognized the services I had tried to render them ever since I have been their representative, and they gave me a substantial majority. I take this opportunity to thank them from the bottom of my heart.

(Text):

When the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. St. Laurent) spoke last Wednesday he informed the house that the Liberal party would not move a motion of non-confidence, nor would the Liberal party support any motion of non-confidence. At that time the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefenbaker) rose and seemed to blame the Liberal party for not offering a motion of non-confidence. I want to assure him that we are not following this course to be pleasant to the Conservative party. We are doing so because we recognize that even if the Conservatives did not receive a majority of the votes, they did get a majority of the seats and we therefore desire to respect the opinion expressed by the electorate of this country. If we had moved a motion of non-confidence the Conservatives would have been the first ones to say we were trying to prevent them from accomplishing the promises they made during the election campaign.

We reserve the right, however, to criticize what we feel should be criticized, and this is what we intend to do until the end of the present session. Last Friday the hon. member for Laurier (Mr. Chevrier) rose in this house and spoke of the attitude of the Conservative party towards national unity. He was rather severe in his expressions, but as a matter of fact he was right. Since the departure of Cartier and Macdonald the Conservatives have tried to run on a division of policy, one policy for one part of the country and another policy for another part of the country. While the hon. member was speaking some hon. members opposite stated he was working against national unity. Why is

the claiming of the rights of a minority said to be working against national unity? We have rights in this country because we were the first citizens to come from Europe. We have rights in this country because we form almost one-third of the population. When we claim those rights it cannot be said that we are working against national unity. We are making an appeal to the well balanced people of both races to recognize those rights, and that is what the hon. member for Laurier was doing and that is what I intend to do today.

Following the speech by the hon. member for Laurier I am told that some newspapers, the Toronto Telegram for one, said that if the Prime Minister had been in the house he might have called an election right away. I doubt that he would have done that because he would have had no reason to call an election unless he was afraid of not being able to fulfil the promises he made during the election. He would have no reason unless he is afraid he has no means of stopping inflation and unemployment which are increasing continually.

I really believe that, with the developments which have taken place since the opening of this session the Conservative party would not dare to go to the people before a certain time. As long as we do not place a motion of non-confidence before the house and as long as we do not approve any motions of non-confidence I think the Conservative party will be only too glad to keep power as long as they can do so.

The hon. member who preceded me said that they have 50 seats reserved for Frenchspeaking Canadians. May I say that they can keep them if they want to. However, they will be filled by French-speaking Canadians but they will almost all be Liberals because we did not receive the representation we were expecting when the present cabinet was formed. As I said before, we make up almost one-third of the population. But what did we get in the present cabinet? We received representation to the extent of forming one-tenth of the cabinet, two out of twenty. Why is that? Is it because the Prime Minister has no confidence in the ten French Canadians from all over Canada sitting on the other side of the house? I do not know. However, the first thing he did was to honour one of them. He called on the hon. member for Three Rivers (Mr. Balcer). What post did he offer to him? He offered him the least he could offer to any man, namely the post of Solicitor General which is generally used as a stepping stone for somebody coming into the cabinet or as a post for a member of the Senate put into the cabinet as a representative of the government.

The Address-Mr. Caron

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PC

Léon Balcer (Solicitor General of Canada)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Balcer:

You do not have to worry, you will never have such a post.

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October 21, 1957