October 15, 1957

MAIN ESTIMATES, 1957-58


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting estimates for the financial year ending March 31, 1958, was presented by Hon. Donald M. Fleming (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, 1957-58


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting supplementary estimates for the financial year ending March 31, 1958, was presented by Hon. Donald M. Fleming (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


FURTHER SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, 1957-58


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting further supplementary estimates (1) for the financial year ending March 31, 1958, was presented by Hon. Donald M. Fleming (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


FURTHER SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, (2) 1957-58


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting further supplementary estimates (2) for the financial year ending March 31, 1958, was presented by Hon. Donald M. Fleming (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE

PC

Donald Methuen Fleming (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. Donald M. Fleming (Minister of Finance):

If the house will permit, perhaps it would be of interest if I were to make a brief statement indicating the nature of the estimates which have been tabled today.

Four sets of estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1958 have been tabled today. The first three of these are the same main, supplementary and further supplementary estimates as were tabled in the House of Commons during the last session of parliament. Except for the items for the Post 96698-24

Office Department these estimates were not finally dealt with during that session. In fact, only seven-twelfths of most of the items in these estimates, or enough to carry the services through to the end of October, were granted.

Since the programs provided for in these estimates were already well advanced when the new government took office, and to avoid the expenditure of a further $20,000 for revising and reprinting them, retabling the existing estimates is considered to be the most reasonable course of action to take under the circumstances. However, this is not to say that the present government will support all of the detailed programs contemplated when those estimates were originally prepared. Rather, such changes as this government proposes to make in the current year programs will be brought to parliament's attention when the individual items affected are being considered by the committee of supply.

The further supplementary estimates which have been tabled for the first time today provide mainly for the general revision of civil service salaries effective May 1, 1957, $31.2 million; a further grant toward the anticipated operating deficit of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, $8.1 million; and expenses in connection with the maintenance of immigrants in Canada, $8.8 million. The other items in these estimates are less sizeable and are generally of the type which it is usual to include in mid-year supplementary estimates. The total estimates, which for the reasons I have indicated I shall describe as gross estimates, for the current year 1957-58 tabled to date amount to $5,597,316,555, including old age security payments which are made from the old age security fund, and loans, investments and advances.

Topic:   EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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Motion agreed to.


AWARDS AND DECORATIONS

CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE

LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. Daniel Mclvor (Fort William):

Mr. Speaker, with your permission may I rise on a question of privilege and congratulate the man who was chosen for the award of the Nobel peace prize. He has shown himself to be a man of courage, initiative, kindness and courtesy. I cannot describe him better than in the words of that great people's poet: A man's a man for a' that.

Nobel Peace Prize-Mr. Pearson

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Right Hon. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I had intended to wait until the opportunity came, but my hon. friend has preceded me and all I can do is say that I intended to rise for the purpose of saying that the recognition of the achievements of those who are politically opposed is not incompatible with my concept of parliamentary life. It is one of the joys of our system of parliamentary government, indeed it is of the essence for its preservation, that members in our parliaments, regardless of the differences that separate them, remain Canadians first.

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker (Prime Minister)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

I want to say that the announcement yesterday of the award of the Nobel prize to one who has been a political opponent but a personal friend is a tribute to him and an honour to Canada. The award of the Nobel prize for peace has come to certain people on this continent on a number of previous occasions and the naming of those who have received that award is evidence of their respective contributions to the laying of those foundations and to the doing of those things which are necessary for the preservation of the achievement of that ideal of world peace which after all is the dominating motive of all of us in the free world.

Among those who have received the award is Elihu Root, a long-time secretary of state of the United States and a great lawyer whose contribution to peace played its part in the building of a system of international law applicable to the nations of the world, in a like manner that the law binds each and every one of us equally under the British system of government and of law.

Another who received the award was a former president of the United States, Mr. Woodrow Wilson, who in his day and generation dreamed dreams and hoped hopes that, while they were not achieved in his day nor have they been since, nonetheless were landmarks of advancement in the preservation and maintenance of those things from which peace can be built.

Then another was the Hon. Frank Kellogg, also a secretary of the United States, who in 1926 advanced, along with Mr. Briand of France, a pact which in his day was believed to have achieved peace for all generations.

These three have been the predecessors in North America of my hon. friend as holders of the award for peace by the Nobel foundation. The award to the hon. member is one, as I said in the beginning, that brings honour to him and it is with the warmest of good

feelings and the most sincere of good wishes that I congratulate him on the honour that has come to him.

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Algoma East):

Mr. Speaker, I have quite literally lost my voice from saying thank you yesterday and today, but I think I have enough left to express my grateful appreciation of the words of the hon. and venerable member for Fort William (Mr. Mclvor) and for the very kind, indeed very generous, words of the Prime Minister (Mr. Diefenbaker). I realize, as I have already said outside this house, that the consideration which must have governed the committee in making this award to me revolved around the fact that I was the representative of Canada at the United Nations and other international meetings where so many of us were doing our best for peace and security in this troubled world.

I know that in that sense I have had very special opportunities because of my position. I know also that I would not have been able to have made the most of those opportunities had it not been for the support which I felt that in the main I was receiving from the Canadian people; the support in the main of this house in the objects we were pursuing and, perhaps I may say, without impropriety, the friendship, advice and leadership which I always received from my leader in the work I was trying to do.

In this sense the award was a Canadian award, and I am very proud indeed to have been the particular Canadian chosen through force of happy circumstances to receive it.

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   CONGRATULATIONS TO MEMBER FOR ALGOMA EAST ON WINNING NOBEL PRIZE
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THE CANADIAN ECONOMY

October 15, 1957