April 12, 1957

LIB

James Joseph McCann (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. McCann:

That is the last word.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   SUCCESSION DUTY
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
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LIB

William Alfred Robinson (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The Chairman:

Shall I report the bill?

Bill reported.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   SUCCESSION DUTY
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
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LIB

William Alfred Robinson (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Deputy Speaker:

Shall this bill by leave be read a third time now?

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   SUCCESSION DUTY
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

By leave.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   SUCCESSION DUTY
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
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LIB

James Joseph McCann (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. McCann moved

the third reading of the bill.

Motion agreed to and bill read the third time and passed.

The house in committee of supply, Mr. Robinson (Simcoe East) in the chair.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
Subtopic:   SUCCESSION DUTY
Sub-subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN CANADA AND THE UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA FOR THE AVOIDANCE OF DOUBLE TAXATION
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INTERIM SUPPLY


The house resumed consideration in committee of the motion of Mr. Harris: Resolved, that a sum not exceeding $1,651,674,050, being one-hal£ of the total of the amounts of the items set forth in the main estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1958, laid before the House of Commons at the present session of parliament; and in addition thereto a sum not exceeding $7,298,566.67, being one-third of the total of the amounts of items 52, 57, 116, 117, 131, 132, 156 248 281, 322, 324, 328, 355, 399 and 460 of the said estimates; a sum not exceeding $697,069.25, being one-quarter of the total of the amounts of items 153, 158, 252 and 397 of the said estimates; a sum not exceeding $3,640,012.17, being one-sixth of the total of the amounts of items 16, 71, 134 217 218 219, 227, 361, 364, 391, 422, 428 and 432 of the said estimates; and a sum not exceeding $2,383,999.92, being one-twelfth of the total of the amounts of items 28, 69, 129, 221, 223, 224, 233, 234, 300 321 333, 424, 425, 430 and 503 of the said estimates; in addition thereto a sum not exceeding $9,635,679.50, being one-half of the total of the amounts of the items set forth in the supplementary estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1958 laid before the House of Commons at the present session of parliament; a sum not exceeding $16,166.67, being one-third of the total of the amounts of items 626 and 654 of the said estimates-and a sum not exceeding $208,333.34, being one-sixth of the total of the amounts of items 621 and 640 of the said estimates; *87 non min additio? thereto a sum not exceeding $7,000,000, being two-sevenths of the total of the amount of item 663 set forth in the further supplementary estimates (1) for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1958 laid before the House of Commons at the present session of parliament; a sum not exceeding $30,555,555.56, being four-ninths of the tot" ft the amounts of items 664, 665, 666, 667 669 Sinnnnnm °t -the .said. estimates: ah'? a sum of $1,000,000 being two-thirds of the total of the amount of item 668 of the said estimates, ficoni granted V* Her Majesty on account of the fiscal year ending March 31st, 1958.


CCF

Thomas Speakman Barnett

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Barneii:

Mr. Chairman, the second

point I was about to raise when the house rose at one o'clock has to do with a matter concerning the telecommunication branch of the Department of Transport, and it arises out of a question which was asked of the Minister of Transport recently, I believe, by the hon. member for Vancouver-Quadra, concerning the matter of the arrears in overtime of employees of the Department of Transport.

As the result of a small press report of the statement by the minister, I have received a communication from an employee of the Vancouver district of the telecommunication branch. I am sure the committee will permit me to quote briefly from this letter without revealing the name of my correspondent. The letter arose from the fact that this gentleman

interim Supply

noticed the report that the minister had promised to look into the question of arrears in overtime. It says:

While Mr. Marler is investigating this overtime situation I wonder if you could bring to his attention that it would be a very good idea if he also investigated the shortage of staff situation in the Vancouver district of the telecommunication branch of the Department of Transport,

Where I am now stationed we are on an overtime basis with one day off in nine.

Perhaps the Minister of Labour might notice this reference to the working conditions under which employees of the government apparently are working at the present time. The letter goes on:

We are on an overtime basis with one day off in nine-and work short changes from shift to shift due to this shortage of staff.

To make matters worse not one member at this station, and the same holds for nearly all this

district, has had last summer's holidays yet_and

now this year's are due. In other words we are on a very tiring overtime shift and due over two months' holidays at this moment.

Perhaps Mr. Marler is not aware of this situation and having it brought to his attention might help relieve this condition.

It might be pointed out to Mr. Marler that this arge shortage of staff in the telecommunications division is probably due to (1) poor wages, (2) poor working conditions or (3) a combination of both. The third is the one I think applies and in order to stop losing more radio operators and to heip the ones left that stick with the job it is time Mr. Marler's department did something as soon as possible, as this condition has existed for a long time now.

I should be interested in anything you can tell me as to relief of this situation.

I realize we are not going to have an opportunity at this session to engage in a full discussion of the estimates of the Minister of Transport, so it probably will not be possible for the minister to give us a detailed statement as to exactly what changes in his department he has in contemplation in this respect. I feel that if the situation described in this letter is correct it is certainly something that should warrant the immediate attention of the minister concerned, and some steps should be taken to relieve it.

I think it should be obvious from the tone of this letter that it originates from someone who is a loyal employee of the Department of Transport and is genuinely concerned that efficient service should be given, but who feels that the working conditions should be reasonable and in line with those that are generally considered acceptable in this country at the present time.

The third point I wish to raise is something that concerns the internal economy of this house. I came here four years ago as a new member; and while I have high hopes that the constituents of Comox-Alberni will see fit to send me back here again, I feel that I can raise this question at this time because

Interim Supply

I am in the same position as every other hon. member at the moment in that we do not know whether we will be back here after a certain Monday in June.

The question I wish to raise relates to what I consider to be a limitation on the effectiveness of the work that individual members of this house, and particularly new members, are able to achieve. This limitation is imposed by the curtailed secretarial help with which we are provided. I know the citizens of Comox-Alberni expect their member of parliament to devote his full time to representing them both during the time the house is in session and when it is not. From my experience in the past four years I know there have been times when quite serious limitations have been imposed on the kind of job I consider I could have done because of the fact that I have not had adequate secretarial assistance. I am sure there are a good many other hon. members of this house, particularly those who are now completing their first parliament, who have felt this limitation; and I feel that this is a point to which a good deal of study might be given by those who are in a position to do that between now and the time the new parliament convenes.

It would certainly be in the interests of the people of Canada if hon. members of this house, at least during the time parliament is in session, were provided with at least one full-time secretary to assist them in performing their duties. I could go further than that and say that from my own experience I feel I could do a much more effective job for my constituents if I were able to have the year-round services of a secretary. I have found it necessary to secure secretarial help at my own expense during the time I spent in my constituency in the recess between sittings of parliament. That sort of arrangement necessarily has to be rather haphazard, because of the lack of continuity in the secretarial help which it is possible to obtain.

As I have said, I am in the same position as every other hon. member of this house at the moment in not knowing whether I will continue to be a member of the house, and because of this I felt I could raise this question today in the hope that if not for myself, at least for future members of this house something may be done to improve the situation.

Topic:   INTERIM SUPPLY
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?

Mr. Patlerson@

Mr. Chairman, my remarks will be very brief; in fact, I think about two or three minutes will be ample time for me to call the attention of the government to a few matters.

First of all I would like to heartily endorse the observations made yesterday by the hon. member for Bow River relative to freight rates. We have constantly objected to the rash of increases which have brought the rates up to their present levels. It is not necessary for me to go into detail with respect to this and outline the discriminatory effect the freight rates have on the economy of the province of British Columbia and my own constituency. I do believe that the rates as they now obtain are much higher than is warranted, and I would join with the hon. member for Bow River in suggesting that there be a complete overhaul of the freight rate structure.

The other matter to which I wish to briefly direct attention relates to the television service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. We have now come to the point where we recognize the importance of this particular medium of communication. Not only does it disseminate information; it also provides entertainment, though some of it is possibly very questionable in terms of value. Nevertheless television has become a recognized service as far as our society is concerned; therefore I feel that all our people should have the advantage of this particular facility. In view of the position occupied by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in this field I feel they should give serious consideration to extending the coverage in various sections of our country.

I wish to call particular attention to a section of my own constituency extending from Laidlaw in the Fraser valley up to Siska Lodge, which represents a considerable area. The reception there is very poor; in fact some areas are not covered at all. The residents of that area feel justified in seeking some remedial action; therefore I make the request through the responsible minister that this subject be taken into consideration. If it has not already been given consideration and a survey made I would request that this be done at the earliest possible moment, so these people may have the opportunity of taking advantage of this service.

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LIB
PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

Before the minister leaves this question may I point out, and I quote his statement on November 29 of last year, in which he listed the functions of the force and ended with these words:

-and to take steps to re-open the Suez canal and to restore and secure freedom of navigation.

Interim Supply

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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

I remember that statement and I can quite agree that in the way it is worded that interpretation could be drawn from it, but if my hon. friend will read the paragraph preceding and the paragraph subsequent to the words he has just read I think it will be clear from the context that I was referring to the function of the United Nations assembly under the resolution. I say this because in the resolution of November 2 one of the functions undertaken by the United Nations did concern the Suez canal, but it was not a function of the United Nations emergency force, as such, to operate in clearing the Suez canal. It was to bring about conditions in the Suez canal area which would make easier a settlement, and that is the exact situation with regard to the force. However, the assembly itself has a duty under these resolutions to deal with the Suez situation.

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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

The United Nations emergency force never did have any responsibility in connection with the Suez then, and has none today-is that correct?

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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

No, Mr. Chairman; it did have a function when it was deployed along the Suez canal, which was then the dividing line between the conflicting forces-

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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

I mean with respect to

navigation?

Pearson: No, not with respect to navigation, but it did have a function with respect to maintaining peaceful conditions in the Suez canal when the forces were there; therefore it would have been their indirect function to facilitate communications by maintaining peace, but once the non-Egyptian forces withdrew from the Suez canal it did not have a function of that kind.

The other question was with respect to the use of the United Nations emergency force in the Gaza strip and on that point I am not in a position to amplify what I have already said more than once in this house in regard to the function of the force in this strip. I do not, however, think that I should pass over without comment the hon. member's insinuation, indeed it was his statement this morning, concerning the effect of the United Nations emergency force's presence in relation to the parties to the armistice agreement I understand my hon. friend said that it seemed as if the force was there to protect Egypt from Israeli incursion-or words to that effect.

Now as I understand it freedom of navigation has not yet been assured through the Suez canal, and I would like to ask whether the United Nations emergency force has dropped that particular function?

82715-221J

My information is that the force is deployed throughout the strip as well as at the demarcation line and that since detailed arrangements were worked out to enable them effectively to prevent and forestall raids across the

Interim Supply

line there has been an encouraging degree of stability in this highly sensitive area. That is according to the report we have received and I believe that the commander of the force, General Burns, is satisfied with the way in which the force is able to carry out its function, although of course its task would be facilitated if it were in a position to operate on both sides of the demarcation line.

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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

On this question may I ask the minister whether there is any so-called gentlemen's agreement between the secretary general of the United Nations and Nasser that the United Nations emergency force will get out if and when he requests them to do so?

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LIB
PC
LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. Pearson:

No, Mr. Chairman, there is no such agreement and, on the contrary, the secretary general has stated more than once to the assembly and to the committee of seven that if any request of that kind were made by Colonel Nasser or the Egyptian government that request would be taken up with the committee of seven and then, if the committee so decided, by the full assembly of the United Nations, before any action was taken. That is the position of the secretary general and it is our position.

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April 12, 1957