April 5, 1957

LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Finance and Receiver General; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Harris:

Tomorrow, Mr. Speaker, we shall start with the estimates of the Post Office Department. I understand the Postmaster General will not be able to be here after one o'clock so that after that we shall turn to the following bills: the second reading of the Canadian National Railways financing bill; the Prairie Grain Producers Interim Financing Act; the Windsor harbour commissioners; the north Pacific seal resolution; the eastern rocky mountain bill; the Senate amendments with respect to the Exchequer Court Act; and the Territorial Lands Act and the Currency, Mint and Exchange Fund Act. If they are completed then other items of legislation will be taken up in whatever manner might be indicated at that time.

May I also say that we have been asked on several occasions how much of this the government feels ought to be passed before prorogation and I should like to express my views on that so that hon. members may consider what I have to say. There is no reason why all the items on the order paper cannot be disposed of in the time we have left.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

How much time have we left?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Finance and Receiver General; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Harris:

We have the time left between now and prorogation; but I should point out that still on the order paper after what I have listed there will be the hospitalization bill, the farm marketing legislation and the Prairie Farm Assistance Act, the three of which ought certainly to be put through, in our view, together with other legislation. I should add to that the Income Tax Act which has not yet been disposed of. Then it would be

desirable to clear up everything that is on the order paper, including an amendment to the Judges Act, notice of which, I think, has been given in Votes and Proceedings. May I also say that there are two or three tax conventions which have been signed in the last few days and which are available and while I realize they are not urgent in the sense that they must go through before the end of this session I think there are matters which are routine now and might very well be passed.

It seems to me that between now and prorogation we should dispose of the order paper and the estimates of the Post Office Department and interim supply in order that when we come back in the fall there will not be anything left over that could be disposed of now. I would suggest therefore that consideration be given to this and if it is the desire of hon. gentlemen opposite to have a supply motion which would be available to them to move a want of confidence motion on we would have to dispose of these matters before that could be done; or at any rate before we call it we would want to be reasonably certain we could dispose of the business I have mentioned.

This can take two forms, as I understand it. Under the rules as they are now a supply motion would have to be called on Monday and conclude on Tuesday night. I do not think there is any possibility that the house could devote two days to a supply motion. On the other hand we could supply a motion which by consent would be limited to one day, or alternately it could be agreed that perhaps the motion for interim supply when it comes could be subject to amendment, although it is not under the rules and Your Honour would stay in the chair while that motion was being discussed for some period of time, part of a day perhaps, but at any rate not exceeding a day.

I have placed the alternatives as I see them before the house. I think perhaps these alternatives might be considered so that even if we are not able to call a supply motion on Monday because of the uncertainty of getting the legislation through we might find it possible to meet the wishes of hon. gentlemen at a later time during next week.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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It being five minutes past six o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order. Question


ANSWER TO QUESTION


The following answer, deposited with the Clerk of the house, is printed in the official report of debates pursuant to standing order 39:


C.B.C. FILM PURCHASES

PC

Mr. Dinsdale

Progressive Conservative

1. How many films produced by the national film board were purchased by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation T.V., during each year since 1953, and how many of these were (a) entertainment: (b) documentary; (c) commercial films?

2. What was the total cost of these films?

3. How many films produced by private Canadian studios were purchased by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation T.V., during this period, and how many of these were (a) entertainment; (b) documentary; (c) commercial films?

4. What was the total cost of these films?

5. How many films produced by Tf.S.A. studios were purchased by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation T.V., during this period, and how many of these were (a) entertainment; (b) documentary; (c) commercial films?

6. What was the total cost of these films?

Answer by: Hon. J. J. McCann (Minister of

National Revenue):

1, 3 and 5. Information regarding different categories of film and footage would be difficult and costly to compile and it is understood that the hon. member will accept information based on costs.

2, 4 and 6. The C.B.C. advises the following payments were made in the periods indicated for the purchase, rental, production, and

processing of film:

April 1, 1953-March 31, 1954:

National film board of Canada.. .$ 25,341

Canadian private film industry .. 151,013

United States films 244,356

April 1, 1954-March 31, 1955:

National film board of Canada . .$ 117,584 Canadian private film industry .. 624,074

United States films 638,016

April 1, 1955-March 31, 1956:

National film board of Canada . .$ 152,515 Canadian private film industry.. 1,046,751

United States films

1,204,8859 months: April 1, 1956-Jan. 31, 1957: National film board of Canada.. .$ 236,144 Canadian private film industry .. 1,517,831 United States films

853,966

Saturday, April 6, 1957

Topic:   C.B.C. FILM PURCHASES
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SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES, 1957-58


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting further supplementary estimates (1) for the financial year ending March 31, 1958, was presented by Hon. W. E. Harris (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


April 5, 1957