January 21, 1957

TRANSPORT

ABANDONMENT OF NEW YORK CENTRAL RAILWAY LINE, CORNWALL-OTTAWA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Albert Peter Lavigne

Liberal

Mr. Albert Lavigne (Stormont):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Transport. Has any consideration been given to service for municipalities affected by the abandonment of the New York Central railway line between Cornwall and Ottawa?

Topic:   TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   ABANDONMENT OF NEW YORK CENTRAL RAILWAY LINE, CORNWALL-OTTAWA
Permalink
LIB

George Carlyle Marler (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. George C. Marler (Minister of Transport):

The hon. member was good

enough to give me notice of his intention to ask this question, Mr. Speaker, but I have been unable to ascertain all the facts necessary in order to reply to it. I shall therefore hope to do so tomorrow.

Topic:   TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   ABANDONMENT OF NEW YORK CENTRAL RAILWAY LINE, CORNWALL-OTTAWA
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FLAX AND RYE

REQUEST FOR MARKETING UNDER WHEAT BOARD


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Edward George McCullough

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. E. G. McCullough (Moose Mountain):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce. Has the government given serious consideration to including the marketing of flax and rye under the complete jurisdiction of the Canadian wheat board in view of the fact that farm organizations continue to press for this being done?

Topic:   FLAX AND RYE
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR MARKETING UNDER WHEAT BOARD
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, the government has given serious consideration to this question. It is obvious that any action by this government would have to be preceded by action in each of the provinces concerned for the same reason that similar concurrent legislation was required in the marketing of oats and barley. Wheat is the only grain that moves to export markets in sufficient volume to give the government complete jurisdiction over its marketing. Whether it would be wise to attempt to take the step suggested by my hon. friend is debatable. There are opinions on both sides. In the light

The Address-Mr. Green of the information the government has at this time it does not propose to take action now.

Topic:   FLAX AND RYE
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR MARKETING UNDER WHEAT BOARD
Permalink

SHIPPING

PILOT BOAT ACCIDENT, SAINT JOHN-REQUEST FOR PUBLIC INQUIRY


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Transport. It has to do with the pilot boat disaster in Saint John harbour. A question was asked on Friday as to what consideration had been given by the government to an inquiry. I ask him whether he is now in a position to answer, and in particular whether in view of the circumstances this is not one case in which there ought to be of necessity an open inquiry so that all the matters in issue, and the circumstances, could be fully considered and known and brought to the attention of the public.

Topic:   SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PILOT BOAT ACCIDENT, SAINT JOHN-REQUEST FOR PUBLIC INQUIRY
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LIB

George Carlyle Marler (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. George C. Marler (Minister of Transport):

I thought that I had made it clear the other day in answer to a question that I thought a public inquiry would be necessary and would be held. Unfortunately I have not received a report from the officer of the department who went to Saint John. I understand that the report now has come to hand and I hope to have its contents later today. However, I am not in a position to say more than I said when the question was asked on Friday.

Topic:   SHIPPING
Subtopic:   PILOT BOAT ACCIDENT, SAINT JOHN-REQUEST FOR PUBLIC INQUIRY
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SPEECH FROM THE THRONE

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed, from Thursday, January 17, consideration of the motion of Mr. R. F. L. Hanna for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the amendment thereto of Mr. Diefenbaker, and the amendment to the amendment of Mr. Shaw.


PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Howard C. Green (Vancouver-Quadra):

Mr. Speaker, in many of the Liberal speeches during this session it has been easy to detect an attempt on their part to portray themselves as great admirers of the United Kingdom and of the commonwealth. Obviously the actions of the government during the Suez crisis last fall, in which Canada was one of the leaders in the attack on the United Kingdom and on France, have received criticism from Canadians from coast to coast. It would appear that the government and its

supporters are now attempting so hard to escape from the consequences of this earlier stand.

Of course, the leadership in the adoption of such a stand was taken by the Prime Minister of Canada. His attitude is very accurately summed up by an editorial in the Chicago Tribune, that paper which for many years has been the leader in bitter, unfair and malicious attacks on the United Kingdom. I have here a report dated December 6, 1956 in which the Chicago

Tribune, concerning the attitude of the Canadian Prime Minister on the Suez crisis, has this to say:

The Chicago Tribune, commenting on Prime Minister St. Laurent's statement in the House of Commons on the Middle East crisis, says editorially it represents an "encouraging growth of the isolationist spirit in . . . unexpected quarters."

This dispatch goes on to say:

The Tribune in a November 29 editorial quotes the Prime Minister's remarks that "the era when the supermen of Europe could govern the whold world is coming pretty close to the end."

The editorial concludes with this comment:

An American official could not have put the case better.

In January of 1957 we have had this great conversion on the other side of the house. There are no more sneers at proposals on this side and no more statements like "ready aye ready" such as were used by the Secretary of State for External Affairs in November and at least in talk the government is now showing some concern for the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

We always did.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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January 21, 1957