June 28, 1956

LIB

John Whitney Pickersgill (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Pickersgill:

I shall be glad to speak to the hon. gentleman about it as soon as it is received.

Topic:   ALLEGED IMPORTATION OF UNITED STATES WELDERS INTO BRITISH COLUMBIA
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

ICELAND


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prince Albert):

should like to direct a question to the Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs, and to ask him whether he is in a position to make any observation on what the effect will be on North American defence should Iceland decide to cause United States troops there under the NATO agreement to withdraw? Would he also say what representa-

tions, if any, Canada by reason of its peculiarly friendly attitude to Iceland, is making in order to warn of the serious danger to North American defence should the course indeed be followed of causing NATO troops to withdraw from Iceland, rendering that country more or less vulnerable to communist attack?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ICELAND
Sub-subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO POSSIBLE WITHDRAWAL OF UNITED STATES FORCES
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LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs):

My hon. friend, I am sure, will appreciate the great importance of this matter and he will not expect me to deal with every aspect of his question. The defence agreement between Iceland and the United States which provides for the stationing of United States forces was concluded in 1951 as a result of a request from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. I should have said at the outset that I am grateful to my hon. friend for having given me notice of his question, and having given me an opportunity thereby of discussing this matter with those whose job it is day to day to deal with this particular situation.

The secretary of state for the United States has recently stated:

The United States has bases in Iceland, not in its own right but acting as an agent for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.

I may say it is a question in which Canada and other NATO countries have a definite interest. The treaty provides that either the United States or Iceland may, at any time, on notification to the other government, request the NATO council to review the continued necessity for the facilities and their utilization, and to make recommendations to the two governments concerning the continuation of this agreement. If, six months after the review by the council, no understanding is reached between the two governments, either government may at any time give notice of its intention to terminate the agreement, Which will cease to be in force 12 months from the date of such notice.

The resolution passed by the parliament of Iceland before the recent elections in that country, which called for a revision of the defence agreement, referred specifically to the appropriate article in the agreement, and at the same time reaffirmed the decision and the intention of Iceland to support NATO.

The Canadian government hopes that if a new Icelandic government should decide to ask for a revision of the defence treaty, as envisaged in the resolution of the parliament of Iceland, it will be possible to reach a compromise satisfactory to Iceland and all of the NATO partners.

We cannot know, however, what Iceland's policy will be toward the defence agreement

until the government has actually been formed. 1 do not think it is desirable at this time that anything further should be said on this matter.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ICELAND
Sub-subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO POSSIBLE WITHDRAWAL OF UNITED STATES FORCES
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ATOMIC ENERGY


On the orders of the day:


PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Howard C. Green (Vancouver-Quadra):

Mr. Speaker, may I ask the Minister of Trade and Commerce whether an amendment has been negotiated between Canada and the United States to the atomic energy agreement? It is reported in the press this morning that some change has been made.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ATOMIC ENERGY
Sub-subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO AMENDMENT OF CANADA-UNITED STATES BILATERAL AGREEMENT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I intended to make an announcement today. It is understood between governments that the announcement will be made at 2.30 this afternoon.

On June 18 I advised the house that the government of the United States had proposed that the Canada-United States bilateral agreement on atomic energy should be amended to provide for an exchange of information with respect to the development, design, construction, operation and use of reactors for the propulsion of naval vessels, aircraft and land vehicles. I am now able to advise the house that the amendment has been signed. Copy of the amendment will be tabled in the house in the next few days.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ATOMIC ENERGY
Sub-subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO AMENDMENT OF CANADA-UNITED STATES BILATERAL AGREEMENT
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REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORTS OF ALLEGED IMPURITIES


On the orders of the day:


PC

Wallace Bickford (Wally) Nesbitt

Progressive Conservative

Mr. W. B. Nesbitt (Oxford):

Mr. Speaker, on a question of privilege, during the last week there have appeared some very disagreeable reports in the press regarding impurities to be found in Canadian cheese. I would like to assure hon. members of the house and people elsewhere that cheese from Oxford has neither manure nor mouse hair in it.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO PRESS REPORTS OF ALLEGED IMPURITIES
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PIPE LINES


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. Daniel Mclvor (Forf William):

Mr. Speaker, I did not give the Minister of Trade and Commerce any notice, but I do not think he needs any. I should like to know whether there is any foundation in fact for the article which appears on the front page 67509-3464

Unemployment Assistance of the Globe and Mail that there are enough orders for gas in Canada alone, without the United States, to make the gas pipe line pay?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PIPE LINES
Sub-subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA PIPE LINES PROSPECTS OF FINANCING WITHOUT EXPORT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Well, Mr. Speaker, all I can say is that orders have been received for quantities of gas which promise to make the pipe-line financeable without recourse to export sales.

On the orders of the day:

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PIPE LINES
Sub-subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA PIPE LINES PROSPECTS OF FINANCING WITHOUT EXPORT
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PC

Daniel Roland Michener

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Roland Michener (St. Paul's):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a supplementary question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce. In view of the hopeful statement he has made as to the economic possibilities of the pipe line with respect to Canadian sales alone, is he now considering revising the program of providing government finances for the pipe line?

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PIPE LINES
Sub-subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA PIPE LINES PROSPECTS OF FINANCING WITHOUT EXPORT
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Port Arthur):

Well, Mr. Speaker, when I reconsider anything to do with pipeline arrangements we will have another three weeks' debate.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   PIPE LINES
Sub-subtopic:   TRANS-CANADA PIPE LINES PROSPECTS OF FINANCING WITHOUT EXPORT
Permalink

INQUIRY AS TO REPORTED IMPORTS FROM POLAND

June 28, 1956