June 26, 1956


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Allen (Jim) Byrne

Liberal

Mr. J. A. Byrne (Kootenay East):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Transport or in his absence to the Acting Prime Minister. In view of the terrible and sorrowful accident that happened to the Venezuelan air liner, I wonder whether the Minister of Transport would consider revising the act having to do with civil aeronautics to provide that no dumping of gasoline shall be allowed while aircraft are in flight?

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR AMENDMENT OF STATUTE TO PROHIBIT DUMPING OF FUEL
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Acting Prime Minister):

In view of the absence of the minister I would suggest that this question be taken as notice.

Topic:   AIR TRANSPORT
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR AMENDMENT OF STATUTE TO PROHIBIT DUMPING OF FUEL
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FINANCE

INQUIRY AS TO POLICY RESPECTING TAX ON CERTAIN ADVERTISING REVENUES


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. H. R. Argue (Assiniboia):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Finance. Can the minister say whether the government intends to proceed with the legislation providing for a 20 per cent special excise tax on the gross advertising content of Canadian editions of United States magazines?

Topic:   FINANCE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO POLICY RESPECTING TAX ON CERTAIN ADVERTISING REVENUES
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LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Finance and Receiver General; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. W. E. Harris (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, last week I was asked the same question and I made the answer that I would have nothing to say on the subject until I introduced the resolution.

Topic:   FINANCE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO POLICY RESPECTING TAX ON CERTAIN ADVERTISING REVENUES
Permalink

PRIVILEGE

MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Erhart Regier

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Erharl Regier (Burnaby-Coquitlam):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege. I have in my hand an editorial, of which I sent you a copy, wherein, two weeks after a motion was decided by this house, you and with you the institution of parliament are still being attacked. To mention only a few of the terms used, you are referred to as "a crooked Speaker". You are compared to a bank robber. You are labelled "a selfseeking Liberal hack with the hide of a rhinoceros". You are accused of deliberately debasing an office.

To my mind this is an attack on our institution of parliament, and I am appealing to you, Mr. Speaker, to say whether some action cannot be taken to maintain or to restore, if it has been lost, public confidence in this institution.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

Dissolve parliament.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I am pleased to inform the hon. member that, according to a principle that has already been laid down and expounded in this house by other members who have risen on questions of privilege, an attack against the Speaker is an attack against the whole house. As a matter of fact, an attack against one member of the house is an attack against the whole house. See citation 157, Beau-chesne's Parliamentary Rules and Forms, second edition. Hon. members have risen from time to time on a question of privilege affecting the honour of a member of the house and have suggested or indicated that some action should be taken by myself. If the hon. member looks at May, fifteenth edition, he will find that whenever action has been taken it has never been by the Speaker but by members of the house themselves. See May's fifteenth edition, pages 125 and 126, also pages 138 to 142. You can find in May's fifteenth edition only one instance where the Speaker has acted himself, and that was when an officer of the house under his own jurisdiction had been attacked, and he came forward and submitted the matter to the house. In all other cases members have taken action themselves.

I must say that it has been quite some time since members have taken action with respect to these matters. The last instance took place some time ago. See Journals, page 108, 1894, and Journals, page 370, 1906. The proper procedure, which I explained myself on at least two previous occasions in the last month-see Hansard, 1956, pages 3563-6 and pages 4528-31-is that a member who wishes some action to be taken proceeds to indicate what constitutes the question of privilege and concludes with a motion. See Hansard, volume III, 1929, pages 2790-7, and Beauchesne's third edition, citation 273. That motion being privileged it may either be considered immediately or may be considered at a time appointed by the house itself. Once the motion has been agreed upon, if it is in order, then a remedy may be applied. That is entirely in the hands of the house and not in mine.

That remedy may consist of calling the author of the article or the publisher of the newspaper to the bar of the house and asking him for an explanation and apology. That apology or explanation may be accepted by the house. If it is not accepted, then the

house may decide whatever punishment it deems advisable. Then it calls back the author of the article or the publisher of the newspaper to the bar of the house, and it is the duty of the Speaker to communicate to him what decision the house has reached. That decision may be a reprimand; it may be imprisonment. In certain cases it has been advocated that even a fine may be decided upon. That was the case in Australia not very long ago. That is the way in which these matters should be looked upon.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER
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LIB

Donald D. Carrick

Liberal

Mr. Donald D. Carrick (Trinity):

Mr. Speaker, may I speak to the point of order?

I should like to ask you if the hon. gentleman, before taking the formal action you have indicated, should not consider whether or not the criticisms he has read arise out of the incidents in this house upon which this house has already passed judgment. You will recall, Mr. Speaker-

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

May I interrupt the hon. member just to say that if a question of privilege is raised and it is not supported by a motion, there is nothing before the house and I would advise the hon. member not to pursue the point. He began by asking me a certain question. I would be pleased to tell him immediately that should that situation arise I shall have to deal with it when it comes up.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER
Permalink
LIB

Donald D. Carrick

Liberal

Mr. Carrick:

I am only asking you, Mr. Speaker, if the hon. gentleman should not take that into consideration before he takes the formal action that you have indicated. On a previous occasion you indicated that certain members of this house had used very extreme language with respect to the conduct of the officials of this house. It may be that this article would not go beyond the language that had been used in this house by some hon. members.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. REGIER REFERENCE TO NEWSPAPER EDITORIAL CONCERNING MR. SPEAKER
Permalink

WESTERN FEED GRAIN

REQUEST FOR INCREASED


On the orders of the day:


June 26, 1956