March 19, 1956

LIB

Marie Ann Shipley

Liberal

Mrs. Ann Shipley (Timiskaming):

First, Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the hon. member for Cape Breton South for his kind words about me and his concern for my people and others in like circumstances. I have been listening to this debate all afternoon, and I kept reading the resolution over and over again. It appeared as though the interpretation put upon the resolution by some of the speakers was that it concerned the maritimes alone. Well, the mover of the resolution did not speak in that vein, nor do I think the wording of the resolution would lead one to believe that is so. It is a general resolution stating that:

-the government should give consideration to the advisability of providing for the economic rehabilitation of people living in communities and areas in Canada where extreme hardships are resulting from the closing down of the principle industries-

In no way, Mr. Speaker, do I want to belittle any claim the maritimes feel they have on the nation. They have my keen sympathy. But on the other hand I object now, as I have objected in the past, to members of the opposition giving the impression to the people of Canada that anything that besets them becomes the responsibility of the federal government. I come from a mining area in the northern part of Ontario. We have faced almost ghost towns, but fortunately by our own grit and initiative, with no help from anyone, we have been able to pull through. It was luck, chiefly, if I must be honest.

But here we are a part of this great province of Ontario. The municipalities located near the mining industries are set up under the jurisdiction of the laws of the province of Ontario. The loans that are made by the municipality itself are controlled by the Ontario municipal board. The extent to which that municipality develops is controlled entirely by the provincial government. In the course of time almost any mine will peter out, and the mover of this resolution specifically referred to wasting resources. Am I to believe from this resolution that the moment the assets of a mine become exhausted the responsibility for the people of that community, in a wealthy province like Ontario, should immediately become the responsibility of the federal government? I would say no.

[Mr. MacLeanJ

Topic:   ECONOMIC REHABILITATION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE EMPLOYMENT WHEN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES CLOSE
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Gillis:

No; I made that quite clear.

Topic:   ECONOMIC REHABILITATION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE EMPLOYMENT WHEN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES CLOSE
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LIB

Marie Ann Shipley

Liberal

Mrs. Shipley:

I am sorry; I missed that point.

Topic:   ECONOMIC REHABILITATION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE EMPLOYMENT WHEN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES CLOSE
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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Gillis:

It is a joint responsibility.

Topic:   ECONOMIC REHABILITATION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE EMPLOYMENT WHEN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES CLOSE
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LIB

Marie Ann Shipley

Liberal

Mrs. Shipley:

The hon. member is the only one who did, then. Here is the whole situation as I see it. If any province has a claim on the national responsibility, and if a situation has been created for the benefit of the nation, then I say that province, or a particular section of that province, has a claim on the national income and on national support. Otherwise, if the province is financially able, it should look after that situation, and it cannot come too soon to suit me.

I am grateful to the hon. member for Cape Breton South for bringing this resolution to the house. Plans should be made now, not only in my own province but in many provinces throughout Canada. It will happen rather suddenly so far as the rest of the people are concerned. Those of us who live in those areas can see it coming. There are millions of dollars worth of assets there. At a time when housing, schools, churches and public buildings are in short supply in Canada, it is inconceivable to me that the life savings of thousands of people should be left behind. In our particular case we are almost in the heart of Canada. When the mines are exhausted where I live, surely we are not going to let these places become ghost towns. I say we will not, but I say we should start now.

If there are places in Canada where there is a national responsibility, so far as we are concerned it is in the gold mining areas. That is being taken care of by the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act. But that is where the responsibility of this government lies, because the restrictive measures in so far as the sale and use of gold are concerned are a national responsibility, and they should take care of it, as they do, for which we are very grateful. But if there are any other areas of national responsibility I hope when the provinces concerned ask for help, this government will take the matter under advisement and make plans now. I am not referring to the over-all problem; I am referring to the instances that were cited by the hon. member who introduced the resolution and that were described in the resolution.

Of course there are certain federal government agencies that can be utilized should such a situation occur, such as those described by the Minister of Labour this afternoon, but those are available to all places to take care of similar problems.

This afternoon the hon. member for Royal said, "Well, in Ontario there were lots of

places where people who are out of employment by reason of the exhaustion of mines could find employment", or something to that effect. These were not the exact words. Well, my goodness, I wish he had lived in a mining community where, when he went there, there was nothing but mud for streets and huts to live in, and worked hard for years and years to build up a community of which he was proud, in which he had invested every cent he owned and had built up something worth while. To suggest that men can find employment elsewhere in Ontario is, I suggest, Mr. Speaker, very shortsighted, and it is perhaps a heartless way to look at the matter. I am sure the hon. member himself has not been faced with that problem, and he did not give the matter enough thought or he would not have made what to me is such a heartless statement.

There are others who say well, when these people go into mining communities and invest their money in homes, and they pay six times as much as is normal to put sewers and water through the rocks, they know that the mining community is expendable, and why do they spend their money? Well, there again it is a thoughtless and narrow-minded person who would make such a statement; but I have heard it, Mr. Speaker. If those people would stop and think for a moment they would know that those lumbering camps, the mining communities and so on, have opened up Canada. Those are the people to whom Canada owes a tremendous debt. They would not say well, we knew it was expendable.

In many instances it has been our whole life. Our children were born there. They have grown to manhood there; they have been educated there and it is their home. Surely with the tremendous wealth in my own province something can be done to induce industry to establish itself there. It would take

19, 1956 2293

Economic Rehabilitation very little. We are not so out of the way, but there are so many different situations. In some provinces and in some parts of the same province the situation is very different. The provincial government should begin to analyse each situation and arrive at a solution to take care of each particular situation.

There is just one particular point I should like to make in my closing remarks, Mr. Speaker. I mentioned the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act which has helped many communities in northern Ontario, northern Quebec and other parts of Canada. I am sorry my colleague the hon. member for Villeneuve has not had the opportunity to speak on this subject. There is one community in his riding, Villeneuve, that would have had to close down three or four years ago but for the assistance of the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act. What has happened? They have found copper within 12 miles of the area where the gold mine was exhausted, and that splendid community will be available for that purpose. That is just luck, and we all cannot be that lucky.

Therefore I hope, Mr. Speaker, that the discussions that have taken place today will be heard by the provincial governments concerned, and that they will take action for those of us who need action from that particular source.

Topic:   ECONOMIC REHABILITATION
Subtopic:   REQUEST FOR PROVISION OF ALTERNATIVE EMPLOYMENT WHEN PRINCIPAL INDUSTRIES CLOSE
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Finance and Receiver General; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Mr. Harris:

I was asked on Friday to indicate when the budget debate would be resumed. It has been agreed that we shall do that on Friday next.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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At ten o'clock the house adjourned, without question put, pursuant to standing order.



Questions


ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS


The following answers, deposited with the Clerk of the house, are printed in the official report of debates pursuant to standing order 39:


RADAR LINES-COSTS

PC

Mr. Pearkes

Progressive Conservative

What amounts have been paid to date as Canada's share in the construction, equipping and maintenance, including pay and allowances, for military and civilian personnel of: (a) "Pinetree" line; (b) mid-Canada line; (c) D.E.W. line?

Answer by: Mr. Campney:

(a) $175,067,690.

(b) $26,673,816.

(c) In the provision of the northern early warning systems, the United States undertook responsibility for constructing and equipping the D.E.W. line, and Canada, the mid-Canada line. Canada, therefore, has made no payments as a direct share of the cost of constructing and equipping the D.E.W. line. Canadian government departments, in particular the departments of national defence, defence production, transport, and northern affairs and national resources, have used their facilities to assist in the construction of the D.E.W. line, and, wherever possible, the United States government has used Canadian contractors, materials and labour.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RADAR LINES-COSTS
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EX-REGULAR ARMY PERSONNEL IN RESERVES

PC

Mr. Pearkes

Progressive Conservative

1. How many ex-members of the Canadian regular army have enrolled into the Canadian regular army reserve?

2. How many of these reservists attended training last year with the regular army?

Answer by: Mr. Campney:

1. 215.

2. 110.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   EX-REGULAR ARMY PERSONNEL IN RESERVES
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CIVIL SERVICE COMPETITION NO. 56-M573

PC

Mr. Hamilton (Notre Dame de Grace)

Progressive Conservative

1. How many classes are to be taught by the instructor in bookkeeping advertised for under civil service competition No. 56-M573?

2. What will be the average number of students per class?

Answer by: Mr. Campney:

1. There will be a total of 16 courses per year, 12 of trade group 3 and 4 of trade group 4, with 50 periods of instruction in each course.

2. 15.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CIVIL SERVICE COMPETITION NO. 56-M573
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COLONEL WOOD ROWE PURCELL

CCF

Mr. Castleden

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. Has Colonel Wood Rowe Purcell been placed in command of Canadian army's warfare and Arctic branch at defence headquarters?

2. If so, how many Canadian troops will be placed under his command?

3. Is he being attached to Canadian national defence for pay, allowances and expenses?

Answer by: Mr. Campney:

1. Colonel William Wood Rowe Purcell is a United States exchange officer on duty at national defence headquarters. He is presently serving as the senior staff officer in the air, Arctic and mobile striking force section of the directorate of military training.

2. None.

3. No.

Topic:   ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COLONEL WOOD ROWE PURCELL
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SURPLUS BUILDINGS, BARRACK GREEN, SAINT JOHN, N.B.

March 19, 1956