July 1, 1955

LIB

Karl Arliss Eyre

Liberal

Sir Archibald Nye:

Mr. Speaker and gentlemen, may I just say briefly that it was 25 years ago when the government of the United Kingdom acquired "Earnscliffe" as the residence, and in the first instance the office, of the High Commissioner for the United Kingdom who had just been appointed.

We were aware at the time that it was a very historic residence, so much so that the high commissioner of the day was instructed from London that before he went ahead with the purchase he should go to the prime minister of Canada and say that we were proposing to buy this house, but that if the Canadian government themselves wished to buy the house either as a residence for the prime minister or for any other purpose, we would withdraw from the transaction and give priority to the government of Canada.

The prime minister of the day, having considered the matter, very kindly said that the government of Canada did not wish to enter into any negotiations for the house, and that left us free to buy it, which we did, and it has been the residence of the High Commissioner ever since.

You will see that we have been conscious from the very first of the fact that we were occupying what I think might properly be called an historic monument in Canada, and we have been conscious, therefore, that there was a duty and responsibility upon us to try and maintain this residence in the state which we feel is appropriate to its history.

I found when I came here that there was no very adequate history of this house. We all know that Sir John A. Macdonald, who was the first prime minister of Canada and the father of confederation had occupied this house, that he had lived there, and that he had died there; but we did not know very much more about it. So I asked one of my officers, Mr. Reddaway, who is here today, if he would, in his spare time and during his leisure, write for us the history of "Earnscliffe".

I was not aware at the time that his father was an historian and that he had an interest in history in his blood, so to speak, and that he had also, so to speak, the nose of a foxhound in nosing out anything of interest.

He has spent an enormous proportion of his leisure-I hope only his leisure-at work on this history of "Earnscliffe", and he has produced two things: one is a written history which is being printed in England now, and which will shortly be available, and the other is a history of "Earnscliffe" in pictures.

We have made an endeavour not merely to give the book character, but to try to bring it to life by giving the story of the people who lived there, with pictures of them, what sort of people they were, and what were their interests and their activities.

It is for other people to judge, but if I may say so, it seems to me that something of extreme interest in our modern active world of a pattern during the last 100 years has emerged as a result. And I felt that since 100 years had passed, this was an appropriate time to do it. I was not unaware of what event is celebrated tomorrow, and I thought this might be a suitable occasion to ask you if you would accept it.

I have already said that Mr. Reddaway did all this work, but wherever he went he found willing helpers. People came more than half-way to meet him and to give whatever information they could. People in every government department; people too numerous for me to mention individually were largely responsible for producing the information on which this is based. A very large number of private residents also came forward with their recollections. It was only in this way that we were able to compile this history.

I felt that since this was so largely concerned with Sir John A. Macdonald and a part of his private life it seemed only appropriate that parliament should have a copy of this very restricted issue of pictures, and I felt too-and I hope this will not be regarded as impertinence on my part-that if this little effort in research on our part led others to desire to imitate it and to carry out research elsewhere, then we would not have lost anything in the doing of it.

If I may say so, I am very touched and very gratified that so many of you gentlemen have found the time to come here on this happy occasion to meet me, and it is, sir, with the very greatest pleasure that I hand to you on behalf of the library of parliament, this book of photographs.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Thank you very much.

Presentation of "Earnscliffe" Album

We will now call on Mr. McGregor to move a formal vote of thanks.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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PC

Robert Henry McGregor

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Robert Henry McGregor:

Mr. Speaker, I want to say how proud I am to be taking some small part in this meeting here today. Probably had it not been for that great Canadian, Sir John A. Macdonald, who lived in that house for many years, we would not have been called here today.

Sir John A. Macdonald was to the Conservative party what Sir Wilfrid Laurier was to the Liberal party. In passing I might say that it is just too bad that they had discontinued the honours conferred upon these great men, because had they not, today we might have been calling the leader of our government the Prime Minister of Canada -instead of calling him "Uncle Louie", Sir Louis.

On behalf of the Commons, sir, I want to thank you for this great work which you have done for us, and I hope that you and your successors will spend many happy days in that old house of Sir John A. Macdonald's, and that you, sir, may go down in history as having done your part to help the recording of Canadian history.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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LIB

Karl Arliss Eyre

Liberal

Sir Archibald Nye:

Thank you very much.

(Translation):

Senator Adelard Godbout: Mr. Chairman, on behalf of my fellow members from the Senate on the joint committee of the library of parliament,

I am pleased to second Mr. McGregor's motion and to express to Sir Archibald Nye all our gratitude for what he has just done.

The album which he has presented at this time will remind us in a very vivid way of certain milestones in the life of Sir John A. Macdonald.

Sir John A. Macdonald was one of the fathers of our Canadian confederation and was the first, under our federal system, to occupy the post of prime minister of Canada. As such, and for many other reasons besides, he belongs to the history of this country.

We are told that some countries, having no history, are therefore unable to forget it. But a country like ours does have its history, and might tend to forget some of its important phases were it not for works like this album to record some of the outstanding events in that history.

Earnscliffe was the residence of Sir John A. Macdonald, but it also has been that of several United Kingdom high commissioners in Canada. Of the latter, some held important posts in the political or economic fields, others in the military field, still others in both those fields.

You, Sir Archibald, belong to this third category. You have left your mark on the world and we owe you much. Please accept this sincere expression of our admiration and of our gratitude.

(Text):

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Gentlemen, shall the motion carry?

Carried, nemine contradicente.

Those who are not members of the committee usually cannot take part in the proceedings, but I take it by unanimous consent that we might make an exception today. Is that agreeable?

Agreed.

The Prime Minister: It is very kind of the committee to allow us to witness this ceremony, and we appreciate it, and we appreciate this gesture on the part of Sir Archibald Nye.

I have not seen the album, but I plan to look at it. There may be one thing missing from it, however, because there is a house, the second from mine at St. Patrick in the county of Temiscouata, on the south shore of the St. Lawrence below Quebec, which was an adjunct of "Earnscliffe", a sort of summer season "Earnscliffe" and I am afraid that you have not got a picture of it in this album.

But this is, I hope, a gesture which will be an example, and which will inspire us to find perhaps not as competent a writer as Mr. Reddaway, but

5556 HOUSE OF

Presentation of "Earnscliffe" Album

to find others who will prepare something similar for many other buildings here in the capital city. I have been asked questions about Government House several times and I would like to have some collection which would be based, as is Mr. Reddaway's history of "Earnscliffe", upon documents which can be relied upon and which would allow the Canadian public to know just how Government House developed, and who its occupants have been. It would be interesting to have that kind of document for every one of the public buildings in Ottawa. I think that some day we may be able to prevail upon the treasury board to allow an item to be placed in the estimates to provide that kind of addition to the interesting and very valuable collection which we already have in the library of parliament.

I thanked you before, Sir Archibald, for having started this, and I wish to repeat my thanks and say that I genuinely appreciate the good example you have set on this occasion. As you have said, we are not unmindful of what anniversary tomorrow will be, and I think it is very appropriate to have this presentation take place on the eve of Dominion day, the 88th birthday of the event which has established for all time the reputation and place in history of Sir John A. Macdonald who, as Mr. McGregor has said, meant to the Conservative party what Sir Wilfrid means to the Liberal party-and they both mean as much to the whole Canadian people.

It is in that spirit that I want to extend congratulations to Mr. Reddaway and to express the hope that he may help us in the good work we should carry on.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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Hon. Mr. Drew@

I also welcome the privilege which has been extended to the Prime Minister and myself to be here with the members of the library committee which today receives this unique gift from Sir Archibald Nye, and I wish to join very warmly with the Prime Minister in what he has said about the example which is offered by this evidence of the continuity of our history.

It does, however, serve to indicate our youth when we regard as a mark of age the fact that this house is 100 years old. Nevertheless, 100 years does establish some measure of maturity, and here in Ottawa it indicates that our capital has been settled for some little time, and that you do live in one of the older-if not the oldest-house, Sir Archibald, which has been occupied continuously in the city of Ottawa.

I cannot help thinking that this may well provide the inspiration that has been suggested by the Prime Minister, and that it will offer encouragement to carry forward research into the background of other buildings in Ottawa and other parts of Canada. I can assure the Prime Minister informally, but nevertheless definitely, that there will be no protracted delay with respect to any item which might be set aside for the purpose of carrying that research into effect.

The Prime Minister: I hope the reporter will make a note of that remark.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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Hon. Mr. Drew@

I can assure you of our hearty support, and I would add this; that while there have been many people associated with this building-and in fact we are reminded that during one stage it was actually used as a hospital-generally there has been a continuity of active interest in the community as well as in Canada on the part of those who have lived there. I think that all of us would also agree that having regard to the things he said and did, as well as his own background, and the depth of his feeling about the association between Canada and Great Britain, at this very time-remembering that tomorrow is

Dominion day-Sir John would, himself, have wished that this building be occupied by the High Commissioner for the United Kingdom here in Canada.

To you, Sir Archibald, I feel sure that we can all say with certainty that Sir John would be with you in spirit in the commemoration of this 88th birthday of Canada which was founded not only by his leadership and genius, but by the co-operation of all Canadians who came together at that time to form one nation of which we are all so very proud today. Thank you very much.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

There is little which one can add to what has already been said so appropriately by the Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition.

I think it is very interesting and proper that in a new country like ours anything which savours of the history of the past should be preserved, and that our younger people in the years to come should have a history of the various historic buildings and institutions that we have here. I have often so thought, as I travelled across this country and have seen so many dilapidated buildings which have historical significance-in my province we have the old building in which the legislative body of the Northwest Territories first met years ago; that building has only recently been restored, after falling into almost complete decay.

I am happy to be here today to witness the presentation of this very interesting volume to the library of parliament. I know it will be preserved and that the people who come after us will look into it with a great deal of interest, realizing that here is the story of the house which was occupied by one of the fathers of confederation-indeed, to some "the father" of confederation; although as the Leader of the Opposition has said, but for the good will and co-operation of all others, not only in parliament but across the country in his time, this great dominion could not have been founded.

I am very happy to have been here today.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I wish to thank you again, Sir Archibald, and those who have participated in our proceedings.

This album will occupy a place of honour in our renovated library; and I want to say in conclusion that few homes in Canada have had such a distinguished list of occupants as "Earnscliffe" has had. It has been the home of a Canadian prime minister, and it is now the home of a High Commissioner for the United Kingdom, and it will continue to be regarded by Canadian people, more vividly and more impressively through this album and the book which will soon be published, as an imposing symbol of friendship and historical association between Her Majesty's kingdoms, the United Kingdom and Canada.

Now, gentlemen, I invite you to take a good look at the album, following which we will participate in a little reception celebrating the event.

Topic:   OF ACCEPTING AN ALBUM OF PHOTOGRAPHS REPORTING THE FIRST CENTURY OF THE HISTORY OF "EARNSCLIFFE" PRESENTED BY SIR ARCHIBALD NYE, UNITED KINGDOM HIGH COMMISSIONER IN CANADA.
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REPORTED SALE OF 10 MILLION BUSHELS TO POLAND


On the orders of the day:


PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to direct a question to the Prime Minister. Will the Prime Minister confirm or deny the press report that arrangements have been made for the sale of 10 million bushels of wheat to the

Topic:   REPORTED SALE OF 10 MILLION BUSHELS TO POLAND
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I. 1955


government of Poland for a reported price of $19 million, $3 million of which is to be paid down by the Polish government and $16 million of which is to be guaranteed by the Canadian government in respect of bank loans to be made for payment for the wheat?


LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I know that the negotiations have been proceeding, Mr. Speaker, in what we consider to be a satisfactory manner, but I have not been informed that they have been concluded. The negotiations did deal with a large quantity of wheat, and did deal with the insurance by the Export Credits Insurance Corporation of a substantial portion of the price to be paid within 12 months, I understand.

Topic:   I. 1955
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Drew:

Will the Prime Minister indicate to what extent, in the opinion of the government, this differs from the Ming Sung transaction, in which the government stands to lose $13 million by a similar guarantee under a transaction which was for the construction of ships for a company in a communist area, but under which the government was called upon to pay money which has not been returned.

Topic:   I. 1955
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Charles Eugène Parent

Mr. SI. Laurent:

Which has not yet been returned; but the government expects this money will be returned within the 12 months of the date of the guarantee to be given by the Export Credits Insurance Corporation.

Topic:   I. 1955
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Drew:

May I ask a supplementary question? Is there any guarantee in a realizable form from the communist government of Poland in respect of the $16 million which will remain unpaid?

Topic:   I. 1955
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

There is no pledge of assets, but there is an undertaking to make the payment and we expect that undertaking will be carried out.

Topic:   I. 1955
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

May

I ask the Prime Minister a supplementary question? Have any deals of this sort been made with any of the so-called iron curtain countries-Russia, Poland, Czechoslovakia- involving government guarantees, and if so, what has been the experience? I am asking that question because I think it is important that everything shall be done, even careful guarantees given, in order to sell the surplus wheat we have. Secondly, I do not think the political complexion of a government should interfere with our trade relationships.

Topic:   I. 1955
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July 1, 1955