March 3, 1955

ARTICLE IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"

REFERENCE


TO speaker's RULING


LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I rise at this time, as I feel I must, to have clarified, if possible, the report of a statement by an hon. member of this house which' appears in the Ottawa Citizen of yesterday. As hon. members know, as Speaker I have duties. In presiding over the deliberations of this house, from time to time I am called upon to make rulings. According to standing order No. 12, in explaining points of order or practice I must cite a standing order or authority applicable to the case. I believe all hon. members will agree that ever since I have occupied this chair whenever I have made any ruling I have cited either previous Speakers' rulings or other authorities to back them up. My rulings are subject to appeal to the house without debate.

Those are my duties but I also have certain rights. One of those rights is that if this recourse of appeal of my rulings is not taken advantage of, then the other procedure is to move a substantive motion and have a debate upon either my conduct or my fitness to occupy the chair. In the Ottawa Citizen of March 2, 1955, page 4, there is an article entitled "Black-Letter Day in History of Parliament". This article begins as follows:

February 23 was a "black-letter day" in the history of Canada's parliament, John Diefenbaker, Progressive Conservative member for Prince Albert, told a luncheon meeting of the Enterprise club yesterday.

He referred to the Speaker's ruling that his questions regarding lay-offs in the C.N.R. be dropped when the government declined to answer.

"Not only can we not get information-we can't even ask for it now," he said. His criticisms were directed specifically against crown corporations (C.B.C., C.N.R., T.C.A., the wheat board, N.F.B., C.M.H.C., Eldorado, and others), which "have grown into a sprawling system of bureaucracy whose authority is above parliament."

There are two or three paragraphs following which I shall pass over, and then there is another heading "Speaker's Ruling". These words are not in quotation marks and may be attributed to the reporter:

Until Monday the opposition could move for records of communications of the corporations, and if they were not produced a vote of the house

was permitted. Now the Speaker had ruled that motions requesting information regarding crown corporations could not be brought before the house or put on the order paper.

The article continues by stating that Mr. Diefenbaker made certain suggestions for the streamlining of parliamentary efficiency.

Topic:   ARTICLE IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"
Subtopic:   REFERENCE
Permalink
PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Prince Albert):

I may rise at this moment, Mr. Speaker, I must say that I never expected, even by suggestion, that anyone would say I had said anything derogatory of Your Honour. That was not intended. It has to be read into it. There is no reference, indirectly or at all, to the impropriety of your ruling. You did not let me know this was going to be brought up, but if Your Honour has any idea that, even in the slightest, there is any derogatory reference to you I certainly have no hesitation in saying without qualification there was not and is not now, and that thought has never even entered my mind. I cannot go further than that.

I deeply regret that Your Honour should have thought it was a personal reference. What I did say was that the rules would have to be changed, otherwise crown corporations would be immune from examination in view of Your Honour's ruling based, as I said at the time, upon previous authority. I unhesitatingly say that anyone reading into my remarks even the slightest criticism of Your Honour does not understand my attitude to Your Honour. It is one of deep respect, deep regard and deep appreciation. Until this moment I did not know the matter was to be brought up. I am speaking spontaneously and from the heart.

Topic:   ARTICLE IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"
Subtopic:   REFERENCE
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I consider the incident closed, and I thank my hon. friend for having straightened out the point.

Topic:   ARTICLE IN OTTAWA "CITIZEN"
Subtopic:   REFERENCE
Permalink

REPRESENTATION ACT

AMENDMENT TO CHANGE NAME OF CONSTITUENCY

LIB

George Roy McWilliam

Liberal

Mr. G. R. McWilliam (Northumberland, N.B.) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 194, to amend the Representation Act.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO CHANGE NAME OF CONSTITUENCY
Permalink
CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

Explain.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO CHANGE NAME OF CONSTITUENCY
Permalink
LIB

George Roy McWilliam

Liberal

Mr. McWilliam:

Mr. Speaker, this is a very simple bill, its purpose being to add a word to the name of the constituency I represent, and thus avoid confusion.

Questions

As hon. members are aware, there are two constituencies called Northumberland, namely Northumberland in Ontario and Northumberland in New Brunswick. I wish to add the great and historic name of Miramichi to that of Northumberland to designate the constituency in the province of New Brunswick.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO CHANGE NAME OF CONSTITUENCY
Permalink

QUESTIONS

FROZEN CHICKEN IMPORTS

LIB

Mr. Goode:

Liberal

1. At what price, delivered Vancouver, all charges paid, may frozen whole chicken, imported from the United States of America be said to be underquoted "on fair market value"?

2. If ,89r per pound was the Canadian price list on frozen chicken in January, 1955, imported from

the United States of America, would these shipments be subject to anti-dumping regulations?

3. If so. for what reason?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FROZEN CHICKEN IMPORTS
Permalink
LIB

Mr. McCann: (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

1. No information.

2. The Canadian list price of imported frozen chicken, delivered Vancouver, all charges paid, is not the criterion which determines the application of dumping duty. Such duty applies when the selling price to the Canadian importer is less than the fair market value or the value for duty of the goods as determined under the provisions of the Customs Act.

3. See answer to question No. 2 above.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FROZEN CHICKEN IMPORTS
Permalink

FREIGHT RATE, FEED GRAINS

PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

What was the freight rate per ton on feed grains shipped to: (a) Vancouver. British Columbia: (b) Abbotsford, British Columbia, in each of the years 1952 to 1954, from Calgary, Edmonton, Saskatoon, Regina and Winnipeg, respectively?

Topic:   FREIGHT RATE, FEED GRAINS
Permalink
LIB

J. G. Léopold Langlois (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Langlois (Gaspe):

CARLOAD RATES ON GRAIN AND GRAIN PRODUCTS (In cents per 2,000 lbs.)

To Vancouver, B.C. (Domestic)

Effective

From In effect Effective Effective March 16, 1953

January 1, 1952 November 25, 1952 January 1, 1953 and in effect

during 1954

Calgary, Alta

730 920 1,000 1,080Edmonton, Alta

790 1,020 1,120 1,200Saskatoon, Sask

920 1,160 1,260 1,340Regina, Sask

920 1,160 1,260 1,340Winnipeg, Man

1,120 1,320 1,440 1,540

To Abbotsford. B.C.

Effective

From In effect Effective Effective March 16, 1953

January 1, 1952 November 25, 1952 January 1, 1953 and in effect

during 1954

Calgary, Alta

730 900 980 1,040Edmonton, Alta

790 1,020 1,120 1,200Saskatoon, Sask

920 1,160 1,260 1,340Regina. Sask

920 1,160 1,260 1,340Winnipeg, Man

1,100 1,300 1,420 1,520

OLD AGE SECURITY BENEFITS TO NON-RESIDENTS Security Act so that Canadian citizens coming

under the act may continue to receive benefits Mr. Hansell: while resident in other countries?

Has the government given consideration to Mr. Robertson: No. The provision for the amending the regulations under the Old Age suspension of old age security payments when [Mr. McWilliam.l

a pensioner absents himself from Canada occurs in section 5(1) of the Old Age Security Act, not in the regulations.

It is provided in section 5(1) that payment may be resumed when the pensioner returns to Canada and, if he returns within six months from the time he left Canada, the pension upon being resumed may also be paid for a period of such absence not exceeding three months in any calendar year.

Topic:   FREIGHT RATE, FEED GRAINS
Permalink

FOOD AND DRUGS ACT

INSPECTION

March 3, 1955