February 22, 1955

SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Prime Minister a question with regard to the report he spoke of this afternoon relative to the radar screen. I want to ask two questions, as

Inquiries of the Ministry

a matter of fact. My first question is whether serious studies have been made to determine how effective the two warning lines would be against guided missiles travelling at speeds of greater than 1,000 miles per hour. If the report which he suggested should be tabled is not too long, would it be possible to have it printed as an appendix to Hansard?

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime

Minister): As to the second question, that of course is a matter for the house to decide. These statements were published quite widely in the press at that time, but if it is desired for the purposes of record to have them printed as an appendix to Votes and Proceedings or Hansard, that could be done as they are not very lengthy.

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Low:

I would like to have that done, if possible, in Hansard.

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is it the consensus of the house that the request made by the hon. member for Peace River be agreed to?

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

With respect to the hon. member's first question, I would not venture an opinion of my own. The chiefs of staff of our two countries have recommended that these warning lines would be worth what they would cost for the security of this continent and incidentally for the building up of the joint strength of NATO forces. That is a matter about which I would not be in position to express any personal opinion. When the hon. gentleman refers to missiles travelling at more than 1,000 miles an hour, that is a lot faster than I can think.

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Might I clarify this point. These documents were tabled earlier by the right hon. the Prime Minister and now a request has been made that they be printed as an appendix to Votes and Proceedings. If they are tabled, that is one procedure; if they are to be printed it might be preferable to have them printed in Hansard.

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Low:

That was exactly what I asked for.

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is it agreed?

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

(For text of documents above referred to, see appendices, page 1419.)

Topic:   EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS
Subtopic:   PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX
Permalink

CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY

REPORTED OBJECTION TO USE OF WORD "ROYAL" IN NAME OF TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN


On the orders of the day:


PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to direct a question to the Prime Minister. Has the

Prime Minister any comments to make to the house in regard to the positive statement in Sunday's edition of the New York Times that the Canadian Pacific Railway planned to call its new transcontinental train the "Royal Canadian", but that the government objected to this and as a result part of the name, "Royal", has been dropped?

Topic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Subtopic:   REPORTED OBJECTION TO USE OF WORD "ROYAL" IN NAME OF TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
Permalink
LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

No, Mr. Speaker, I was quite surprised to hear anything about that. When my attention was called to a newspaper report this morning, I had not heard of it at all.

I have had inquiries made to find out what, if any, are the facts which would justify that kind of an assertion. I have seen the suggestion that it was because this government disliked the word "royal". Well, that is nonsense. The constitution of this country is a monarchial constitution and I have always asserted, and I know that is-well, I hope it is-the unanimous sentiment of every hon. member in this house, that that is the best kind of constitution for the Canadian people that we could hope for.

Any suggestion that there is any dislike of that kind of constitution or of the proper use of the word "royal" is quite beside the point. I have declared many times that wherever it is proper the word "royal" should be used. It is unhesitatingly used when the consent of Her Majesty has been obtained. Of course, that is a part of the monarch's prerogative and we never attempt to use the word "royal" in any descriptive title without prior approval by the monarch. All hon. members know what are the many places in which it is used, namely, the Royal Canadian Navy, the Royal Canadian Air Force, the Royal Canadian Artillery or Regiment, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the Royal Mail, and many others.

Under our constitution the executive government of this country is vested in Her Majesty. We all remember what was the unanimous feeling of this house a couple of years ago when a bill was introduced having to do with the royal style and titles as proper for use in Canada. We were all unanimous that Her Majesty should be described as the Queen of the United Kingdom and Canada, and we all asserted that it was as Queen of the United Kingdom that we were proud to have Her Majesty as the Queen of Canada because that recalled the historical development of our Canadian institutions. Her Majesty is the beloved Queen of Canada because she is Queen of the United Kingdom and because historically the monarch of the United Kingdom has been monarch of this land as well as of the United Kingdom from at least 1763. Any suggestion

1378 HOUSE OF

Inquiries of the Ministry that there is any republican feeling is a suggestion that is quite foreign to me and I hope quite foreign to all hon. members of this house.

Topic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Subtopic:   REPORTED OBJECTION TO USE OF WORD "ROYAL" IN NAME OF TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
Permalink
PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Drew:

Mr. Speaker, I am sure that hon. members throughout the house will agree with the sentiments expressed by the Prime Minister, but my remarks were directed to a positive statement appearing in a very reliable publication. I would suggest that it might be desirable that a statement be made as soon as appropriately possible dealing with this particular case which has been described in such positive terms.

Topic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Subtopic:   REPORTED OBJECTION TO USE OF WORD "ROYAL" IN NAME OF TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
Permalink
CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

May

I ask the Prime Minister a supplementary question? I am in agreement with what the Prime Minister has said, but should not the use of the word "royal" be confined to institutions and organizations intimately connected with the government of Canada. The government might find itself bombarded with requests to use the word "royal" in connection with this, that and everything. Should it not be confined to governmental institutions or organizations?

Topic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Subtopic:   REPORTED OBJECTION TO USE OF WORD "ROYAL" IN NAME OF TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
Permalink
?

Mr. Si. Laureni@

I think it is usually confined to governmental institutions, but there are exceptions. The most recent one that I remember is when the permission of Her Majesty was obtained to call the Winnipeg ballet the Royal Winnipeg Ballet.

Topic:   CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY
Subtopic:   REPORTED OBJECTION TO USE OF WORD "ROYAL" IN NAME OF TRANSCONTINENTAL TRAIN
Permalink

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

BANGKOK CONFERENCE


On the orders of the day:


February 22, 1955