February 22, 1955

APPENDIX A

JOINT ANNOUNCEMENT RESPECTING AIRCRAFT WARNING SYSTEMS, SEPTEMBER 27, 1954


On April 8, 1954, the governments of Canada and the United States issued a joint announcement, which after referring to the construction of the "Pinetree" radar chain, announced plans for the establishment of a further radar system "generally to the north of the settled territory in Canada". The Canadian government subsequently decided that it would be appropriate, as a part of its contribution to the common defence requirements of the two countries, for Canada to undertake responsibility for financing, constructing and operating this new system, which is generally referred to as the "mid-Canada line". During the time that plans for the mid-Canada line have been under development, studies have also been going on to determine the feasibility of providing even earlier warning of the approach of hostile aircraft. As a result of these studies, the Canadian and United States governments have agreed in principle that there is a need for the establishment of a distant early warning line across the far northern part of North America, and have directed that detailed planning for such a line should be initiated at once. The basis of participation by the two countries in the construction and operation of the line, and the division of costs, will be determined after the detailed plans have been considered and agreed. In developing the complete system for warning of the approach of hostile aircraft and for the control of interceptor forces, the two governments have followed a policy building outward from the likely target areas. Thus the first step, which has now been largely completed, was the construction of the main control and warning radar installations in the continental United States and the populated part of Canada. The second step, which is now under way, is the provision of the mid-Canada line. A third measure, the need for which has now been agreed upon between the two governments, will be the provision of a distant early warning line across the most northerly practicable part of North America. Portions of the complete warning and control system in Canada will be extended to seaward on both flanks of the continent by the United States. The establishment of these North American defence installations is a costly and difficult task, which is being undertaken because our security requires it and is being accomplished successfully because of the readiness of Canadians and Americans to work together in a common cause.


APPENDIX B

JOINT ANNOUNCEMENT RESPECTING AIRCRAFT WARNING SYSTEMS, NOVEMBER 19, 1954


On September 27, 1954, the defence departments of Canada and the United States issued a joint announcement on the progress being made in the development of a comprehensive jointly operated system for warning of the approach of hostile aircraft and for the control of interceptor aircraft. Four main elements of a warning and control system now appear to be practicable, namely: the main control and warning radar installations in the populated part of Canada (the jointly operated "Pinetree" network) and in the United States, which are now in operation; a warning line north of the settled areas of Canada (the mid-Canada line) being built by Canada; a warning line across the most northerly practicable part of North America (the distant early warning line); and portions of the complete warning and control system in Canada to be extended to seaward on both flanks of the continent by the United States. In the announcement of September 27, it was stated that the Canadian and United States governments had agreed in principle that there was a need for a distant early warning line across the far northern part of North America and had directed that detailed planning for such a line should be initiated at once. As a consequence of the progress which has been made since the announcement last September, the two governments have now decided to proceed with the construction of the distant early warning line. Experience has shown that projects of this nature can be carried out most effectively by vesting responsibility for all phases of the work of construction and installation in a single authority. In the joint statement of September 27, referred to above, it was announced that Canada had undertaken the responsibility for the construction of the mid-Canada line. In the case of the distant early warning line it has been agreed that although both Canada and the United States will participate in the project, responsibility for the work of construction and installation should be vested in the United States.



Wednesday, February 23, 1955


February 22, 1955