February 22, 1955

DIPLOMATIC INSTRUMENTS

TABLING OF BILATERAL AND MULTILATERAL AGREEMENTS

LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, I table a number of agreements, bilateral and multilateral, between Canada and other countries which have been signed in recent months.

Topic:   DIPLOMATIC INSTRUMENTS
Subtopic:   TABLING OF BILATERAL AND MULTILATERAL AGREEMENTS
Permalink

TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY

LIB

George Carlyle Marler (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. George C. Marler (Minister of Transport):

Mr. Speaker, I table herewith, in English and French, the report of the board of inquiry which my predecessor, the Hon. Lionel Chevrier, established to investigate the collision between a T.C.A. North Star aircraft and an R.C.A.F. Harvard aircraft near Moose Jaw on April 9, 1954. The conclusions of this report are such that I think I can add nothing to the statement made by my colleague, the Right Hon. Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Howe), at the last session of this house; and for this reason I decided to hold the document for tabling at this session rather than release it in the interim.

I should like to add that the recommendations of this board have received the most attentive study by my department. Some of these recommendations have already been implemented, while others are still under consideration.

Topic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink
PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

May I ask the minister when he received the report of the board of inquiry in connection with the Moose Jaw air disaster.

Topic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink
LIB

George Carlyle Marler (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Marler:

I am unable to answer that question at the moment. I think it must have been perhaps six or eight weeks ago, but I am not certain of the date. I would have to inquire to give my hon. friend reliable information.

Topic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink
PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

May I ask why, with the house in session since January 7, it has not been laid before the house until now?

Topic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink
LIB

George Carlyle Marler (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Marler:

I have already covered that in the statement. I think the report corresponded very largely with what my colleague the Minister of Trade and Commerce had said at the last session of parliament. I think my hon. friend will And there is very little difference between the two.

Topic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink
PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

That is not an answer.

Topic:   TRANS-CANADA AIR LINES CRASH AT MOOSE JAW IN 1954-REPORT OF BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink

CRASH NEAR BRAMPTON IN 1954 REPORT OF TECHNICAL BOARD OF INQUIRY

LIB

George Carlyle Marler (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. George C. Marler (Minister of Transport):

Mr. Speaker, I table herewith, in

English and French, the report of the technical board of inquiry which I established to investigate the accident to a T.C.A. Lockheed aircraft near Brampton, Ontario, on December 17, 1954. The document tabled, contains the report of the board, the appendices, transcript of evidence, and certain of the principal exhibits.

Having regard to the exhaustive inquiry made by the board and the positive nature of its findings, I have come to the conclusion that no useful purpose would be served by setting up a public board of inquiry as I originally contemplated.

It will be noted that in its report the board made certain suggestions concerning equipment for air traffic control. These sug gestions are receiving careful consideration by my department and so far as it is feasible to do so they will be implemented. The board has also made certain recommendations as to the relationship between airline captains and airline first officers; these recommendations are being taken up by my department with the major Canadian air lines.

Topic:   CRASH NEAR BRAMPTON IN 1954 REPORT OF TECHNICAL BOARD OF INQUIRY
Permalink

NATIONAL DEFENCE

DISTANT EARLY WARNING SCREEN


On the orders of the day: Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, may I refer to the question asked on Monday, February 14, by the hon. member for Prince Albert (Mr. Diefenbaker) regarding the contribution by Canada to the distant early warning screen. As I have made clear, the provision of this distant early warning system is a jointly conceived Canada-United States project. The 1376 HOUSE OF Inquiries of the Ministry joint plan calls for two early warning lines, one north of the settled areas of Canada and known generally as the mid-Canada line, and a second line across the most northerly practicable part of North America, known generally as the distant early warning line. These two lines will supplement the presently operating control and warning line known as the "Pinetree" line. Canada has undertaken to finance, construct and operate the mid-Canada line, and the United States has undertaken responsibility for the construction of the distant early warning line. In addition to undertaking the mid-Canada line, Canada will, in respect of the distant early warning line, contribute such resources of the R.C.A.F. and the R.C.N. as can be made available, and will assist the United States in organizing and using other Canadian resources. The participation of Canada in the operation of that line is still under consideration, and we will not be in a position to make any decision about that until more is known about the numbers and the technical skills required in connection with that distant line. The outline I have given is a short paraphrase of two joint Canada-United States announcements made on September 27 and November 19, 1954, which were published at the time; but it might be the wish of the house to have them on record, and if so, I should be glad to table them at this time.


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

May I ask the Prime Minister a couple of questions arising out of his statement? What would be the total cost of the three radar protective screens? What proportion of that total cost will Canada bear in relation to the United States contribution? In order to remove the idea that some people have, that the joint venture of the United States and Canada may in some way be an invasion of or an impingement on Canada's sovereignty, what are the terms of the agreement with the United States to assure that there shall not be any invasion of that sovereignty?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   DISTANT EARLY WARNING SCREEN
Sub-subtopic:   CONTRIBUTION BY CANADA
Permalink
LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

With respect to the first question, it is not possible at this time to state what proportion Canada will be bearing in the joint enterprise that consists of the three warning lines. I can say that, with respect to the "Pinetree" line, it is approximately one-third. The mid-Canada line is being taken care of in its entirety, both as to cost of construction and the commitment of operation by Canada. The other line is one about which no estimates that one could hope would be anything more than a guess could be made. The hon. gentleman knows

what the conditions are in the northernmost points at which the line can be established. It is a matter, with respect to costs, about which nothing accurate can be determined at the present time. Moreover, it has been discussed between the chiefs of staff of United States and our chiefs of staff on the basis that for security reasons it would not be desirable to disclose any figures at this time. Of course, the location of some of these posts will become known because there are some who travel in those remote parts and there will be physical evidence of what is being done. But it was agreed that there would be no statements made either in Washington or here without prior notice to each other.

With respect to the invasion of Canadian sovereignty, nothing has been done that does not flow quite naturally and appropriately from the commitments we have made under the North Atlantic treaty for the common defence of the area envisaged in that treaty. These three lines have been regarded as something essential as a part of the build-up of the joint defence, and the allocation of responsibility for certain services has been made under the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, and every other member of the organization is pledged to assist whatever member of the organization is charged with certain responsibilities.

With respect to the "Pinetree" line, for example, we did not have, and we have not yet, sufficient qualified personnel to operate the whole of it; but it has been stipulated that progressively, as we do find it possible to replace the United States personnel in those radar stations, it will be our privilege to do so. That is the general policy that underlines, according to a declaration that was made quite a long time ago, that anything done on the territory of the other country by Canada or the United States would remain under the control of the authorities of the country where the operation was being carried out. It is no longer possible to be isolated from each other. This is something which is regarded as necessary for the protection of the North American continent and requires to be done as far from vulnerable points as possible, and on the North American continent, from the north, the farthest points are Canadian territory.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   DISTANT EARLY WARNING SCREEN
Sub-subtopic:   CONTRIBUTION BY CANADA
Permalink

EFFECTIVENESS OF RADAR SCREENS

PRINTING OF REPORTS AS APPENDIX


On the orders of the day:


February 22, 1955