June 3, 1954

VETERANS AFFAIRS

SECOND REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE


Mr. W. A. Tucker (Rosthern) presented the second report of the special committee on veterans affairs.


LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I am told that it is not the intention to move concurrence in this report, which is a rather lengthy one. Shall the deputy clerk dispense with the reading of the report?

Topic:   VETERANS AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   SECOND REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   VETERANS AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   SECOND REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE
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DEFENCE PRODUCTION

AERIAL CAMERAS

PC

Frank Exton Lennard

Progressive Conservative

Mr. F. E. Lennard (Wentworth):

Mr. Speaker, on a question of privilege, yesterday a question of mine dealing with aerial cameras was answered. The second part of the question reads as follows:

How many aerial cameras were contracted for during the period from January 1, to April 30. 1954, and what was the total value?

The answer given was "nil". In the Financial Post of April 24, 1954 appears a list of contracts awarded by the Department of Defence Production for the first half of March. In that list there appears over $1,500,000 worth of aerial camera contracts awarded to Ernst Leitz (Canada) Limited, Midland. It is very evident that either the officers of the department do not know what they are buying or the answer given to me is misleading. I should like this question to be put back on the order paper.

Topic:   DEFENCE PRODUCTION
Subtopic:   AERIAL CAMERAS
Sub-subtopic:   INADEQUACY OF ANSWER
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Defence Production):

If I may give the explanation, either the hon. member or the Financial Post is wrong about the description of the camera contracts placed with Ernst Leitz (Canada) Limited. They are what are known as gun cameras. They operate from the ground or from the air but they are not known as aerial cameras. We go by the definition of the article that we believe to be correct.

LLater:]

Topic:   DEFENCE PRODUCTION
Subtopic:   AERIAL CAMERAS
Sub-subtopic:   INADEQUACY OF ANSWER
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PC

Frank Exton Lennard

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lennard:

May I ask the Minister of Trade and Commerce whether or not the gun cameras mentioned are the gun cameras on planes for aerial photography and so on?

Topic:   DEFENCE PRODUCTION
Subtopic:   AERIAL CAMERAS
Sub-subtopic:   INADEQUACY OF ANSWER
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Porf Arthur):

That may be so;

I am not an expert on gun cameras. If my hon. friend would phrase his question so as to ask how many cameras were ordered and ask us to specify the types, we will be glad to give him the information.

Topic:   DEFENCE PRODUCTION
Subtopic:   AERIAL CAMERAS
Sub-subtopic:   INADEQUACY OF ANSWER
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QUESTIONS

LONG BRANCH RIFLE RANGE, TORONTO

PC

Mr. Pallelt:

Progressive Conservative

1. How many acres are there in what is known as the Long Branch rifle range in the township of Toronto?

2. What buildings, if any, are situated on the ranges?

3. What percentage of the area of land is in fact used for military purposes?

4. Did any active army personnel use the ranges last year?

5. How many reserve army personnel used the ranges during 1953?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   LONG BRANCH RIFLE RANGE, TORONTO
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LIB

Mr. Blanchette: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. 303 acres of land.

2. A workshop, a magazine, a hose reel shed, a range warden's house, a general mess hall, seven range buildings owned by individual units of the Toronto garrison, two wartime buildings used as emergency married quarters by the army and a number of other wartime buildings used by the city of Toronto as emergency shelters.

3. Approximately 90 per cent. The remainder is occupied by the emergency married quarters and emergency shelter buildings.

4. Yes.

5. Twenty eight different reserve force units used the range during 1953. In addition twenty-five military rifle associations and personnel of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, Ontario provincial police and Royal Canadian Army Cadets also frequently used the facilities of the range. Details of numbers of individuals using these ranges are not available.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   LONG BRANCH RIFLE RANGE, TORONTO
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VETERANS LAND ACT

SMALL HOLDINGS

PC

Mrs. Fairclough:

Progressive Conservative

1. How many veteran small holding establishments are there in Canada, under the Veterans' Land Act, established on parcels of land in excess of one-half acre?

2. What is the total acreage of the said establishments?

3. How many of the total acres of the said establishments were under cultivation and producing

crops in 1953?

83276-344J

Questions

Topic:   VETERANS LAND ACT
Subtopic:   SMALL HOLDINGS
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LIB

Colin Emerson Bennett (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Veterans Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. Bennett:

1, 2 and 3. Departmental records are not maintained on the basis of the questions asked. However, veterans have been established as small holders under the Veterans Land Act as follows: Under 1 acre, 8,793; including 1 acre up to 2 acres, 4,344; including 2 acres and up to 5 acres, 9,347; including 5 acres up to 25 acres, 3,663; including 25 acres and up, 1,594.

The average size of a small holding is 6.2 acres.

No record of number of acres developed is maintained, but reports on a sample of about half the small holdings show that on nearly 55 per cent of them summer vegetables and fruit are grown and an income sufficient to meet V.L.A. payments is made from the land; while good progress towards similar production is being made on another 35 per cent of holdings.

Topic:   VETERANS LAND ACT
Subtopic:   SMALL HOLDINGS
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ISRAEL HALPERIN

June 3, 1954