March 31, 1954

HISTORIC SITES

ESTABLISHMENT OF "WOODSIDE" AS NATIONAL PARK

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. Si. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I have a short announcement to make regarding Woodside, the boyhood home of the late Right Hon. William Lyon Mackenzie King.

The Woodside property includes the old residence and about eleven acres of wooded land in Kitchener, Ontario. Plans to restore the site were made by a group of interested citizens in 1942. It was not until 1950, however, that it was possible to bring these plans to fruition. In that year the Mackenzie King Woodside trust was established as a nonprofit, non-political corporation with the purpose of restoring Woodside. Contributions were received by the trust from Canadians in many walks of life, and the trust has since carried out the physical restoration of the site at a cost of some $90,000.

Shortly after the work was started the directors of the trust approached the federal government with the suggestion that when restoration was completed Woodside be made a national historic park. This proposal was referred to the historic sites and monuments board of Canada. The board, after investigation, declared Woodside to be a site of national historic importance and recommended that it be taken over and maintained as a national historic park. The recommendation of the board was made in May, 1952. The restoration having been completed, it has now been decided to accept the offer of the trust and to take over the site as a national historic park as of April 1, 1954.

Topic:   HISTORIC SITES
Subtopic:   ESTABLISHMENT OF "WOODSIDE" AS NATIONAL PARK
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RESTRICTIVE TRADE PRACTICES

CHINA AND EARTHENWARE

LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Stuart S. Garson (Minister of Justice):

Mr. Speaker, I beg to table the report of the restrictive trade practices commission concerning alleged instances of resale price maintenance in the sale of china and earthenware.

Topic:   RESTRICTIVE TRADE PRACTICES
Subtopic:   CHINA AND EARTHENWARE
Sub-subtopic:   TABLING OF REPORT ON RESALE PRICE MAINTENANCE
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EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT


Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce): Mr. Speaker, I should like to make a statement to the house in regard to negotiations with Japan for the exchange of most-favoured-nation trade treatment. As hon. members are aware, these discussions have sought a treaty which would be mutually beneficial to both countries. An agreement on commerce between Japan and Canada was signed this morning by the Secretary of State for External Affairs and myself and by the ambassador of Japan to Canada. The Canadian government welcomes the signing today of the trade agreement with Japan which, when it is ratified and comes into force, should contribute to the prosperity and good trading relations of both countries. Japan is a great trading nation and last year was Canada's third best customer. The importance of the agreement, however, goes beyond commercial considerations, for the agreement should also contribute to stable and friendly relations between the two countries and to the peace and security and progress of the Pacific area. If the house so wishes, I shall table the agreement now and outline its principal provisions. Under the terms of this agreement Canada and Japan will exchange unconditional mostfavoured-nation trade treatment. The agreement also provides that neither country will impose or maintain restrictions or prohibitions affecting its trade with the other country unless similar measures are applied equally to all third countries. Similarly, in the allocation of foreign exchange and in the administration of foreign exchange restrictions affecting trade, each country will accord unconditional most-favoured-nation treatment. In a supplementary exchange of notes which is appended to the agreement Canada reserves the right to establish special values for duty on any imports entering Canada in such increased quantities and under such conditions as to cause or threaten serious injury to domestic producers of like or directly competitive products. In the event of such special values being applied, and in



Trade Agreement with Japan determining the level at which such values should be applied, Canada will take into account the prices of like or directly competitive products imported from other countries. Under the agreement either country may temporarily impose discriminatory import and exchange restrictions, if such restrictions are required on balance of payments grounds. However, such restrictions must not discriminate between Canada and other dollar countries or other countries with convertible currencies. The government of Japan has also undertaken, subject to certain agreed exceptions, to accord Canada unconditional nondiscriminatory treament in relation to any other country with respect to import and exchange controls on the following nine commodities: wheat, barley, woodpulp, flaxseed, primary copper, lead in pigs, zinc spelter, synthetic resins and milk powder. The agreement also provides for non-discrimination in state trading practices. Both countries undertake to conform to internationally accepted fair trade practices, particularly in matters pertaining to trade marks, marks of origin and rights under patents. They also undertake to co-operate in the prevention of any practices which might prejudicially affect their mutual trade and to accord sympathetic consideration to any representations that the other country may make. The two countries have agreed that the provisions of this agreement continue to be applicable in the event that the general agreement on tariffs and trade is applied between Canada and Japan. As I have indicated, this agreement will enter into force on its ratification by both countries. A resolution for approval of ratification will be introduced in the house as soon as possible.


PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Donald M. Fleming (Eglinton):

Mr. Speaker, in view of the importance of this treaty may I ask the minister when copies of the agreement will be made available to members? Is it a document of such length that it could be printed as an appendix to today's proceedings or is it one that will be printed in the ordinary treaty series? If so, could we have some assurance that the printing will be expedited so there will be printed copies available as soon as possible?

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Pori Arthur):

I shall inquire as to whether it can be printed as an appendix to Votes and Proceedings. If not, I will see that printed copies are available as soon as possible.

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

Can the minister give the house any indication as to when it is proposed to submit the treaty to the house for ratification, in the light of its importance? I take it from what the minister has said that the treaty will not come into effect until ratified by parliament. Can the minister then indicate when it will be submitted to the house?

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Port Arthur):

Under the British system the agreement has been ratified by signature on behalf of the government of Canada. However, approval of the house will be sought on the action that the government has taken. The ratification referred to is ratification by the Diet in Japan.

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. H. R. Argue (Assiniboia):

I take it from the minister's announcement that Japan agrees to buy minimum quantities of Canadian grain. If so, what are those quantities?

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Port Arthur):

Any reference to minimum quantities of grain is, Mr. Speaker, apart from the treaty itself.

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Argue:

Will there be an exchange of notes or other steps taken in regard to minimum purchases of grain?

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Port Arthur):

I have already said we have assurances that are satisfactory to the Canadian government as to the future quantities of grain to be purchased by Japan.

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

In view of what the minister has said as to the treaty having come into effect now, I go back to the question I asked and which he has not yet answered as to how soon it is intended to submit the treaty to the house, along with the proposed resolution to which reference was made?

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe (Port Arthur):

I hope that the resolution can be put on Votes and Proceedings today, and as soon as the program of the house will permit I presume there will be a discussion here. That is for the house leader to determine.

Topic:   EXCHANGE OF MOST-FAVOURED-NATION TREATMENT
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THE ROYAL ASSENT

March 31, 1954