March 18, 1954

THE ROYAL ASSENT

LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received the following communication:

Ottawa, March 18, 1954

Sir:

I have the honour to inform you that the Right Hon. Thibaudeau Rinfret, Chief Justice of Canada, acting as Deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, will proceed to the Senate chamber today, Thursday, the 18th March, at 5.45 p.m., for the purpose of giving the royal assent to certain bills.

I have the honour to be, sir,

Your obedient servant,

J. F. Delaute,

Secretary to the Governor General. (Administrative)

(Translation):

SALE or FRENCH LANGUAGE NEWSPAPERS IN CAFETERIA

Topic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
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LIB

Hector Dupuis

Liberal

Mr. Heclor Dupuis (Sf. Mary):

Mr. Speaker, may I ask you to look into the advisability of putting on sale a morning and an evening French language newspaper in the parliamentary .cafeteria? I believe I am speaking on behalf of a large number of my colleagues in making this request.

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LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I shall be pleased to give consideration to the hon. member's request.

(Text):

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THE PRIME MINISTER

WELCOME ON RETURN TO HOUSE OF COMMONS

LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

If Hansard could have

registered the genuine sentiments of admiration and affection felt in all parts of the house for the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent), sentiments which prompted the enthusiastic applause we have heard in the last few seconds, no words of mine would require to be spoken. I know that all hon. members, however, want me to tell the Prime Minister that we are very pleased to see him back in his seat in the house from his good-will tour around the globe and looking so well.

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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

of SHAPE where I heard a concise but very instructive report from General Gruenther. I was also shown some interesting old Canadian archives that are still in Paris, although I think we have photostats of them in our own archives here. But there is something in just feeling these things that have come down from two or three centuries, though perhaps after my visiting the Orient two or three centuries would not have appeared to me to be so impressive as they were when I was examining these old documents relating to Canada's early history.

From there we went to Germany and I was delighted when I met for the first time Dr. Heuss, the president of the German republic. He is a man with a long university career, and with the appearance and the charm of a man of great culture. He confirmed the impression we had all formed of Chancellor Adenauer when he was here and which was also confirmed by the impression made upon me by the chancellor's colleagues in the ministry, namely that the leaders in these days in Germany are looking to a future where gains will not be dependent upon war but where they will be the result of good international relations between that country and all its neighbours. I think that the chancellor and his colleagues are most anxious to provide for a future where they will be allowed to live and where it will be their pleasure and satisfaction to let others live alongside of them.

I then had the privilege of visiting the troops at Soest under Brigadier Anderson. The barracks that are being provided there are magnificent. Everything has not yet been done but I should just like to give one little illustration that impressed me. When I asked the brigadier about the school facilities, he said they were coming along but that his own young son who is 7J years old was attending the German public school. When I reported that fact to the chancellor, who I found had already heard of it, he said that our men were all behaving in the manner best calculated to make them accepted as true and sincere friends and as people for whom his German population would always have respect and admiration.

The next day we flew to Grostenquin. There I found the morale of our men to be very high, in spite of the fact that all the difficulties have not yet been overcome for them. The commander of the squadrons there, with his wife and their three children, are still living in a trailer but for that 1 had admiration. The officers are giving the men the impression that whatever are the difficulties, they are no greater for the men than

they are for the officers themselves. I think that is one of the explanations of this high morale I found everywhere among our troops. They all felt that they were human units in a joint endeavour being made by themselves and by those who were commanding them. It was at Grostenquin that we had our first disappointment. We had expected to go the same afternoon to Zweibrucken but the weather was still bad; we were experiencing the seasonal continental weather at that time. The plane that had gone from Grostenquin to Paris to bring the ambassador up to take part in our visit had not been able to put down at Paris and had come back without him and we were not able to get into Zweibrucken. I am sorry because I greatly appreciated the privilege of saying to these men, on your behalf, Mr. Speaker, and on behalf of my colleagues, that we realize that they are doing a large portion of our share in this general undertaking to maintain peace in the world. The time that we would have taken to visit Zweibrucken was taken up by visiting Guesslin, one of these farming villages in Lorraine. I must confess that I was somewhat depressed at the feeling that there might be still quite a large number of these villages or farming communities in France-the like of which we have not in this country-which do not appear to have changed greatly through many of the past decades. But every person we saw seemed to be good-humoured and seemed to feel that they were living quite comfortably but it was obviously under conditions with which our people in Canada would not be perfectly satisfied.

From there we flew to Rome. We got there late in the evening and came down from considerable heights to ground level rather quickly. I therefore found, when I stepped off the plane, that there was not much that I could hear. Then there was such an array of klieg lights that I found that within a few seconds there was not much that I could see. Hence for a moment or two I was, more than usual, in strange surroundings. But that condition disappeared and the warmth of the welcome that was accorded to us there was really quite moving.

We were invited to meet President Einaudi, another university man whose whole career until recently has been in the field of study and teaching, and who certainly has no other desire than to see the whole world at peace and' to see all the people of the world have the opportunity to pursue the kind of careers of which his own is one of the examples of what an intelligent man would prefer to do rather than engage in the horrible business of destroying each other. I met the new 83276-197

18, 1954 3101

Prime Minister's World Tour prime minister, Mr. Scelba, and several of his colleagues who are quite firm in their resistance to communistic influence in their country and quite confident that that resistance is and will continue to be successful.

Personally I had another disappointment in Rome, one that was shared by several of those who were accompanying me. We had hoped to be received in audience by His Holiness the Pope but the condition of His Holiness' health was such that he was not able to receive anyone at all. I went and paid my respects to Monsignor Montini who, as hon. members know, was here a little over a year ago. I also wished to see Monsignor Tardini but was told' I might not be able to see him because he was at that moment closeted with the Pope. We went around to his office just the same to leave cards and just as we got there Monsignor Tardini was coming out and was able at that time to give us very encouraging news of the state of health of the Holy Father. Unfortunately there have been relapses, and the state of his health is still giving grave concern.

The next day was quite a memorable one.

I was received by the mayor of Rome, mayor Salvatore Rebecchini at the capitol. They put on a great municipal demonstration at the capitol and pointed out to me where Tarpeian rock was and' warned me it was not very far from the seat of the mighty to this Tarpeian rock. They seemed quite conscious that under the democratic institutions as they existed 2,000 years ago and as they still exist the difference is perhaps no more than our colleague, the hon. member for Quebec South (Mr. Power), mentioned some time ago when he said that the transition from a private car to an upper berth was always something that could happen in politics. I was presented with a silver replica of the famous wolf with Romulus and Remus getting what would look from the replica to be a very welcome meal provided by the wolf.

Then we flew to Bahrein. As hon. members know, that is an island under a British protectorate. We were greeted there by what I suppose would be the crown prince, the eldest son of the reigning sheik himself, Sheik Ibn Salman Heklealifa, who extended cordial greetings, much to my surprise, because I had not been informed we were going to be received there. We were just stopping there as a matter of convenience to avoid travelling further by night. We stopped' with the Hon. Mr. Burrows, the British political resident in that island. We were told that it was a place

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Prime Minister's World Tour where it never rained, but we were also told that for three days preceding our arrival it had rained quite steadily, and that was quite evident from the state of the airfield because it was rather splashy when we put down in spite of the great skill of the pilots of our plane.

The next morning we went on to Karachi. There we were received by our old friend, Prime Minister Mohammed Ali, with the cordiality those who know him can well imagine for themselves. We were put up at government house with the governor general, Ghulam Mohammed, who wanted' to be especially remembered to our Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott). It appears that for quite a long period he had some of the cares our Minister of Finance still has, and he always has retained an affectionate regard for a fellow sufferer as a result of their meetings at several international conferences.

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Subtopic:   WELCOME ON RETURN TO HOUSE OF COMMONS
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?

An hon. Member:

The extortioners must stick together.

Topic:   THE PRIME MINISTER
Subtopic:   WELCOME ON RETURN TO HOUSE OF COMMONS
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

I also had an interesting conversation with Sir Mohammed Zafrulla Khan and met for the first time there, although I did meet his opposite number in other countries as well, a minister of parliamentary affairs. We do not call our Minister of Citizenship and Immigration (Mr. Harris) a minister of parliamentary affairs, but it was explained to me that his functions were very much like those of our good friend, although he combines them with being minister of law. Here we prefer to call our minister the Minister of Justice, but there they are content with the feeling that their law may mean the same thing as justice.

We went up to Peshawar and stayed there with the governor, Mr. Shahbuddin, a brother of the former prime minister of Pakistan, Mr. Nazimuddin, so that evidently political changes do not always have all the repercussions that they might be expected to have. These governors are appointed by the central government, and the brother of the former prime minister is still the governor and is a very cordial and very likable gentleman. We went up the Khyber pass right up to the Afghanistan border. A barbed wire fence marked the border and there was a guard just on the other side. We were warned we must not step over the line marked by the barbed wire, but I did go right up to the fence and extend my hand which was taken very cordially by the captain of the guard. I expressed feelings of good will and he said he was sorry that I was not going to visit his country. We warned the photographers that perhaps it

would be just as well not to make any pictures of that incident because we did not want to get the captain of the guard into any embarrassing situation.

But when I got to Delhi I met the ambassador of Afghanistan to India. He had heard of the incident and thanked me for expressing good will to the guard and also expressed his regrets that I was not visiting his country. He did that in the most perfect French, which I am sure the hon. member for Eglinton (Mr. Fleming) would admire as much as I did. The drive up the Khyber pass is most interesting because it reminds one of the centuries that the pass has been the gateway for invasion into southeastern Asia from the time of Alexander the Great right on down. We were very cordially received by the Khyber Rifles, whose mess is at the head of the pass. On the way up we met many of the tribesmen who were also most cordial, almost embarrassingly so. They presented me with two sheep. I was told that we did not have to go through the whole of the ancient ceremony. The ancient ceremony implied that the recipient of the sheep was to turn them back to be sacrificed and roasted immediately for a feast that was to be shared. However, Mrs. Roosevelt has established the precedent that it is quite sufficient to put your hand on their heads as a token of ownership, and then ask the donors if they will not excuse you from remaining for the other festivities because of your other engagements.

At Peshawar I met a friend of our Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner), a Mr. A. E. Palmer, who has been there for a couple of years as an agricultural expert. He knew all about what had taken place in the Lethbridge area, and is quite encouraging. He says that though they have good irrigated wheat lands, they have only been getting an average of ten to twelve bushels per acre, while in the Lethbridge irrigated areas the least they get is thirty-five bushels and it goes up to sixty. By selecting seeds he had been getting forty or more from demonstration plots. He is quite firmly convinced they are going to be able to bring in and demonstrate the adaptability of the kind of seed that will enable these people to double or perhaps treble the amount of wheat they get from the same land.

I think that is the kind of thing that is being done under the Colombo plan and the technical aid plan, which is most practical and appropriate. It is not possible for the production of this continent, even if half of it were turned over annually to the hundreds of millions in those countries, to make very much difference in their standard of living.

Whatever is done under these plans can be added to the result of their own productive effort and the improvement of that effort, but it can be only the kind of addition that the oil fields are making to the economy of Alberta, which still has as its sound foundation the agricultural production of that great province.

Mr. Palmer is also firmly convinced that they can make sugar out of beets better and more profitably in the northwestern frontier province of Pakistan than they can make it out of sugar cane. He has convinced Mr. Sardar Rashid Khan, who is the chief minister of that province, that is probably so, and it is going to be tried out. Of course, they realize that growing beets is quite a lot of work. The work has to be done right down close to the ground, but these people do all their work sitting on their haunches so it is not going to be anything backbreaking to them to thin and weed rows of sugar beets.

Then we went to Lahore, that great old city, not the largest but perhaps one of the most interesting we did visit. Unfortunately the governor, His Excellency Mian Aminuddin, was indisposed but his Begum and members of the government met us at the airport and took us to government house where we were magnificently entertained and made most comfortable. There was a large dinner party given that evening, perhaps not only on our account, but it was the next to the closing day of the annual horse fair and agricultural show at Lahore. There were many people who had come, not because there was going to be a visitor from Canada, but to see the very interesting show that was being provided. Among others at this dinner there was the Prince Ali Khan, His Highness the Maharaja of Jaipur, the Maharani of Jaipur, Prime Minister Malik Khan Noon and other members of the government. It was a very impressive oriental dinner party in magnificent surroundings. We have not the like of these palaces that are being used by the native governors and were formerly occupied by the representatives of the controlling powers.

I went for about half an hour to this horse show the next day, really more to see what a holiday oriental gathering was like than to follow the incidents on the program. I found there is not very much difference between the appearance of a holiday crowd in the east and the appearance of a holiday crowd in our own country. I saw there another confirmation of the fact that men, women and children are much the same all over the world. I saw something also that made me still think of home. It was a musical ride by the governor general's guard.

83276-197J

18, 1954 3103

Prime Minister's World Tour It was very well done, but I remembered the musical ride I had seen performed by the R.C.M.P. at the time of the coronation in London. I think I would be very hard put if I had to decide which was the more impressive of the two. In both cases the performance seemed to me to be perfection. There was exactly the same rhythm in the bearing of the men and the action of the horses. They were beating the time much better than I was doing when I was reviewing those guards of honour that were lined up at most of the places where I stopped.

Then, of course, we saw some of the beauties of that spot, the Shalimar gardens. These gardens were laid out certainly more than a century before those of Louis XIV at Versailles, which might seem to have been the pattern. Then when we got to India we saw the gardens that had been laid out around the palace at New Delhi, which was built only a quarter of a century ago. They are perhaps more like the Versailles gardens than the Versailles gardens are like the Shalimar gardens, so it would seem these things can move from east to west and back to the east. Everything that is done by man not to mar the beauties of nature but to make the beauties of nature more apparent and striking is much the same all over the world.

I also had an opportunity to see for the first times these great red forts that were erected in the sixteenth century and afterwards by the Moghul emperors. This country must have been extremely prosperous at one time because these red forts, the temples they contain, the palaces and different apartments that are provided are of a splendor that cannot be other than the reflection of a state of considerable prosperity at the time they were provided.

At New Delhi we were also received in the governor general's palace, that is the one that was erected when New Delhi was being provided as the new capital. I got the impression, and told Prime Minister Nehru, that it was a good thing it had been done before the minister of public works had to get an appropriation from parliament to provide it, because it was done on a scale for which it might be difficult to get appropriations in a democratic assembly. Perhaps it is a good thing. There are already 360 million people in India and the population is increasing all the time. It may be a good thing the palace was provided on that scale, with seventy-odd acres of gardens around it, for that set the scale for all the establishments of this new capital.

There is a lot of land there that does not look very attractive for agricultural

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Prime Minister's World Tour purposes, so they are going to have plenty of space to develop their new capital to meet the requirements of these hundreds of millions of population. There is a possibility, perhaps even a probability, that they will get back to a state of prosperity which enabled the red forts to be built in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

The Prime Minister, Pandit Nehru, devoted a lot of time to me, for which I am very grateful. Our conversations, were, of course, very frank and very intimate. I am not going to be guilty of any breaches of confidence, but he was at great pains to explain to me his views of the historical development of the political regimes and economies and the cultural developments of the successive civilizations of these old countries, and the results of the ferments that are now taking hold among those hundreds of millions of people.

I should like to mention one or two things I saw. I saw the Qutab Minar, a great tower almost 300 feet high, I think, of huge blocks of cut rock and marble. One wonders how that was done thousands of years ago. We have no record of the cranes or other equipment they used to do those things in those days. But the blocks were raised to great heights and put together with some kind of cement or mortar that our contractors do not use in these days.

Alongside of the Qutab Minar there is the "iron tower", the "iron pillar". It is two hundred feet high. I am told it has been there for hundreds of years, and that it is practically pure iron-over 99 per cent pure iron. It is not oxidized; it has not suffered at all through all those years, and I am told that we just cannot do those things today. We cannot produce iron of that purity. And that is just one of the other things that lead me to believe that human nature has not changed through all these long centuries, and that we should not be over-proud of our achievements at the present time. I say that because there have been achievements in the past that we cannot equal today. We have much that we can pass on in industrial know-how to those great nations of the East, but there has been developed there long before our era much that could be used by us in our own lives.

We went to Agra and saw the Taj Mahal. Well, that is something which is a marvel to behold, and just makes one wonder how it was done. Perhaps it may have been a part of welfare state legislation. There are records showing that it was seventeen years in the building, and that 20,000 people were employed in constructing it. It is quite evident that neither time nor money were

EMr. St. Laurent.]

factors, and it is obvious that the aim was perfection, and I think that perfection was achieved.

At Fatehpur Sikri we saw another of these red forts that Shah Jahan had erected, within which was a little temple enclosing the shrine of the saint who had promised him a male heir-and more than carried out the promise when, within the normal period of time, there were two male heirs born to the same favoured queen. This prompted Shah Jahan to erect a fort there

in which he did not reside very long because, I am told, the climatic conditions and the conditions of the water were not conducive to long life.

From there we returned to Delhi. I had been honoured at Peshawar with an honorary degree, and again received a similar honorary degree at Delhi. I found there was a generosity in the East in respect of this function that I had not experienced in the West. I brought back with me two gorgeous red robes that were presented to me as the accompaniment of the degree of doctor of laws that was awarded to me by these ancient seats of learning.

At Bombay we stayed with Governor Sir Girja Bajpai who is well known to many of us who have attended meetings of the international assemblies, and was also greeted by the chief ministers and charged by them, as I had been on other occasions, with the best wishes and greetings to our houses of parliament. I was privileged to attend a meeting of the assembly of the people in the parliament at New Delhi and to hear Mr. Nehru make a speech, of the tour d'horizon type, on external affairs. And it was quite impressive to me to find there in the East exactly the same atmosphere we have here in our House of Commons accompanying their introduction of the democratic processes which have been found so advantageous in the conduct of public affairs of free men and women.

From India we went to Ceylon, and were the guests of the government of Ceylon at Temple Trees in Colombo and of the Governor General, Lord Soulbury, at the King's Pavilion in Kandy. We were also entertained by Sir John Kotalawala, Prime Minister. We met Sir Oliver Goonetilleke, the Minister of Finance, who, as happens in many countries has, apparently, the right of veto on any proposals that come from any of his other colleagues and who, I am told, is keeping the finances of his country on the kind of footing that had been agreed in London a year ago, and that was confirmed at the recent meeting in Sydney.

I will not mention the monuments that have come down from ancient history connected

with Ceylon. But we were taken to the Temple of the Tooth at Kandy. We did not see the tooth but we saw all kinds of treasures that have been placed there by kings and grandees as their tribute to this shrine, which is of such importance to those of the Buddhist faith in the whole of the East.

I went to the home of the late prime minister, D. S. Senanayake and deposited a wreath on his tomb there. We were received for tea in their home-and that is something that is not generally accorded to visitors. I think it was a tribute to the genuine and sincere friendship for and confidence in Canadian visitors. What struck me at Kandy was the tremendous progress that is being made under Sir Ivor Jennings, Vice Chancellor of the University of Ceylon, in transferring the campus from Colombo to Kandy. They have a beautiful setting there. Hon. members will know that Sir Ivor Jennings was for a year or two connected with the University of British Columbia; and I am not sure that in selecting this site for the new campus he had not remembered the physical situation of the University of British Columbia.

He is one who does not seem to be too fearful of the restrictions of the minister of finance because, just the day after we were there, I saw a report that the university council wanted some 20 million rupees more than had already been provided for the work that was going on. Many resident quarters have already been provided. Their main administration building is there. I was told that about one-third of the faculties had already moved up to Kandy from Colombo. They do not feel that it will be very long before they will have the whole university provided for up there. It will be a university to take care normally of some 2,000 students. Alongside of it is Trinity College, which is attended by five hundred or six hundred bright young men, teenagers, whom it was my privilege to see and to whom it was my privilege to say that we looked upon them and their generation for the implementation of this universal desire for peace and good will throughout the world.

From Colombo we went to Indonesia and were greeted by President Soekarno and were received at his home. That is another of those magnificent palaces provided under the former regime and now being used under the independent government of the people themselves. Prime Minister Sastroamidjojo was also very kind to us. Hon. members will recall that he was the first ambassador of Indonesia accredited to Canada while he was still ambassador at Washington and was here not long ago in his capacity as accredited ambassador of his country to Canada. The

Prime Minister's World Tour president has never visited this hemisphere. I think he is looking forward to doing so, and from my conversations with him I know he is keenly interested in what goes on here. He had heard about the oil fields in Alberta; he had heard about the work of the Aluminum Company at Kitimat; he had heard about the iron ore in northeastern Quebec and Labrador and also of the St. Lawrence seaway project, and inquired about the details of those projects, as did others in several other countries. I was quite surprised at the fact that there was quite a lot of accurate information about the development that is going on here, and which they found so astounding and so encouraging. I got the impression that these people welcomed the development of this new Canadian nation as an element that was going to be of benefit to the whole world in its intercourse in the family of nations.

I got the impression that they felt that this is a new country that is developing and one that requires good relations with the whole world, and that its growth and strength will be an element of stability that will be helpful to us all. It was heart-warming to find these ancient civilizations of the East did feel that this country in its development was taking on increasing importance in world affairs, and that its influence was always apt to be helpful for stability and peace.

In Manila the president, Magsaysay, was also very cordial, as one would expect, and there one did get the feeling that the influence of North American ways had produced greater effects than it had in any of the countries we had previously visited. The president was most cordial. A couple of days before he had a bout of toothache and had two teeth removed. He seemed to be most cheerful and relaxed. Some of his friends told me they had hardly ever heard him make so delightful a speech in such a light and friendly tone. I was quite surprised next morning when they told me that he was rushed back to the hospital as soon as we left to have some more teeth extracted. He certainly had been able to conceal his physical suffering, if there had been physical suffering, and there must have been, because one does not go back to a dentist in the middle of the night to get some teeth extracted unless there is something pretty painful about it.

We went from there to Korea, and I shall have another opportunity of expressing views about the situation in that country. The morale of all our men is splendid. I was very happy to find that since the actual fighting has ceased they have been able to overcome by their own efforts many of the inconvenient features that interfered with their physical comfort in the surroundings in which they

Prime Minister's World Tour find themselves. But there again, one has the vivid impression that it is the human touch of the officers that contributes largely to this family spirit that you feel between the men and the officers, and this conviction of each and every one of them that he is a Canadian doing a Canadian job for himself and for his fellow Canadians in this participation in the joint effort to prove aggression to be unprofitable.

I accepted there the hospitality of General Taylor, the commander of the Eighth Army, for whom our men have, I think, quite as high a regard as they have for their own officers. They told me that he treats all under his command on exactly the same footing, and that there is no difference whatsoever in his regard for those who belong to the Eighth United States army and those who belong to the other units of the United Nations who are co-operating with that army. I went up to see the demilitarized zone, and saw on our side an impregnable defence line, and I was told that what was being done on the other side was just about the same. Their intelligence is that on neither side are there any evidences of preparations for offensives being made, but that on both sides they are very strongly entrenching their existing lines. I hope there may not be any resumption of offensive on either side, because that would appear to be something that would necessarily prove to be very costly because of the condition in which those defensive lines have been put during the armistice period.

From there I flew back to Seoul in a helicopter with an open door and perhaps about a hundred feet from the various levels of the surface. It is a terrible country in so far as terrain is concerned, and one cannot see why any one of those hills that were the scene of such bloody battles was of sufficient importance to justify the kind of fights that were made for their possession. They are all the same, but the line has to be held somewhere. This one has no particular strategic importance, but the one behind it has no greater strategic importance. They are all like that, back to the capital city of Seoul. Therefore one appreciates that if there was to be a demonstration of the futility of aggression it had to be made with firmness and it had to be made in that very difficult terrain.

We had dinner with President Khee, who is not too firmly convinced that the state department is always right; but I did not get the impression that he was going to do very much about it.

In Japan we got the same friendly greeting and the same friendly care. I was really

touched. I have no doubt, of course, it had been organized, but there were thousands of youngsters from perhaps five to 15 years of age lining the streets with Canadian and Japanese paper flags, waving them and grinning all over their features, showing every demonstration that it was for them a joyful occasion. Perhaps that was because of the fact that it was during school hours. Nevertheless I had the impression that these thousands of youngsters were being made aware that there was a country called Canada, and that they were there to see the representative of that country. I believe it will help in their geography lessons, and it will probably keep them conscious of the fact that there is such a country and that that country wants to be their friend, and wants them to be our friends.

The same cordiality was manifested by His Majesty the Emperor and by the Empress. I had been brought up to believe that they were of another species than just ordinary mankind, but there could not have been a more intimate family atmosphere than that provided at this informal luncheon. I say the luncheon was informal, but the preparation were quite formal. I had the Emperor's carriage provided for me. It was the second time it had been used since the war. The first time was for the vice-president of the United States, though probably it had been used on some other occasions. I understand the carriage is provided for an ambassador when he goes to present his credentials. But the imperial carriage and the whole cavalcade passed through the streets in weather conditions reminiscent of the coronation parade in London last June. But it was a very intimate, human reception we were given by Their Majesties in the palace. Prime Minister Yoshida and members of his cabinet, with whom I chatted, said in so many words that their military men had entered upon a terrible undertaking in 1941 with the expectation of making gains, but that the Japanese people had realized that no gains had been made, and that it was not likely in this age, and with the present methods of warfare, that war could mean any gains for anyone in the future. I got the impression that they were sincere in their views and that they did not want or expect to see their country at war again.

I had the privilege there of meeting the men on our destroyers Haida, Cayuga and Crusader, and there again I found the same high morale, and the same feeling among those to whom I spoke, that they were Canadians carrying out Canada's share and doing their part in a job which Canada and many

other nations feel should be done in the interests of stability and peace in the world, and that they were proud of the fact that they were doing it well. This high morale of our men in Korea is due in large measure to the success which has attended the operations of our rotation scheme. They know they are there for a set period and so far there has been no breakdown in the rotating of these men, and they do not expect that there will be any breakdown. They know what they are up against, for what period they are up against it, and when they may expect to come home. When they do they can, if they so wish, re-enlist for another tour of duty. The fact that there is this precision, and that it is not only paper precision, but actual working precision in the terms of their duty there, has much to do with the spirit in which they accept the discomforts. It is not all the pleasant feature which I witnessed in the sounding of the retreat by one of these battalions when they were going through their ceremonies of lowering the flag at eventide. They know what they have to do and they are satisfied they are doing a good job, and doing it well.

At Honolulu we were also very graciously received and I was taken around by Admiral Stump on his boat to tour Pearl Harbor and have pointed out to me what happened on the morning of December 7, 1941, how it happened, and why it is that there are still the remains of no less than 1,000 American seamen in the Arizona on whose deck we were and where it was my privilege on behalf of all of us to deposit a wreath.

We then visited the aircraft carrier Boxer and were shown what a modern aircraft is and what it can do if ever it requires to be done. I believe all those men are prepared, and feel as we do that that state of preparedness and readiness may be sufficient to avoid the necessity of ever having to bring these planes into action.

It was with perhaps some increased confidence, that that state of preparedness and the high morale of our friends all over the world will bring about that happy condition, that I come back to my duties in this house and invite you, Mr. Speaker, and my colleagues not to complacency, but to a feeling that what is being done at the present time is of sufficient value to make it worth while to continue doing it.

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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Hon. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, with all other hon. members of the house today I join in welcoming the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) back in such obvious good health after his extended and very important trip.

Prime Minister's World Tour

I had the privilege of meeting him at the airport last evening on his return, and I must say that his colour and appearance of constant sunshine seemed even more in contrast with the cold breezes at the Rockcliffe airport last night than it does here in the chamber this afternoon.

The Prime Minister left with the assurance that he represented all Canadians in conveying a message of good will to the people of those countries he was about to visit. It was in that spirit that he left, and it is in that spirit that we welcome him back here today.

All of us were interested that he perhaps paid great attention to the advice which Sir Winston Churchill gave him in the early stages of his trip. In fact, the Prime Minister looks so well that some of us might reasonably wonder if the senior prime minister of the commonwealth might not have imparted to him some further advice on how to keep the kind of health that we would all like to enjoy.

The Prime Minister has expressed his belief that some useful purpose would be served by the presence amongst the people, and particularly the children of other lands, of one whom they recognized as a Canadian. I think every one of us will heartily agree with what he has said in that respect. Undoubtedly at this time expressions of good will, manifestations of friendship, and the indication of a real and continuing interest in the welfare of other nations within the free world and beyond, are things that form an important part in the building of that better understanding which is the very cement of the structure of a strong, united and free society throughout the world.

I have no doubt whatever that the very fact that the Japanese school children and other school children were doubtless given a holiday or a half holiday on that occasion will remind them for many long years that, on a particular day in their youth, they had the opportunity to see and to pay their respects to a representative from Canada.

It was in the belief that Canada would be represented in that way that we all extended our good will at the time of the departure of the Prime Minister. The advantage of these contacts cannot be overestimated. Certainly to deal with human beings as individuals with whom some intimacy has already been established greatly facilitates those formal exchanges that are such an essential part of the business of every country today. We have heard a review of an extended trip such as no predecessor of the Prime Minister has had the

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Prime Minister's World Tour opportunity to take and in a time which, only a few years ago, would have seemed utterly impossible. I think many of us- perhaps not the younger members of parliament-will recall the excitement with which in our youth we read Jules Verne's "Around the World in Ninety Days". That was a fantastic dream in those days.

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?

An hon. Member:

"Around the World in Eighty Days".

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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Drew:

Mr. Speaker, I am corrected.

I am told that it was eighty days. We will reduce it by ten to be conservative. In those days that was a fantastic picture of speedy travel. Nowadays, with modem aircraft, these contacts can be made so much more quickly. We all know that the speed of aircraft is constantly increasing. As that speed increases, undoubtedly useful purposes will be served by extending even more contacts of a similar nature in the years ahead. We have heard the Prime Minister review the scenes which have passed before his eyes. I have no doubt he might echo the words of Tennyson that we all remember:

I am a part of all that I have met;

Yet all experience is an arch wherethro'

Gleams that untravell'd world whose margin fades For ever and for ever when I move.

This world indeed is becoming a better-known world. Trips like this help to make that fact a reality. As the Prime Minister has indicated, a later occasion will be accorded to deal with certain details of the trip and to discuss certain political aspects -and I use the term in the broadest sense- of the visit he has made. Today our purpose is simply to welcome him home; and we do that with a whole heart.

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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, there is little that I can do but echo the words so well spoken by the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew). When the Prime Minister left we all realized that we were sending abroad one who, in himself, represented to a remarkable degree the culture of the two major nations which have built up this country that we call Canada. That he has done that ably and well, we know. We felt before he left that he would do so.

This afternoon we enjoyed a travel with him around the world. He has come back to us with a knowledge of people of different countries, of different climates and of different' cultures which is not accorded to any of the rest of us. In his leadership of Canada in the next few years I am quite sure that he will be able to make a still greater contribution to bringing about a better understanding between ourselves and other people

like us and those great peoples of the Orient with their ancient ways and cultures.

I was happy to know that a holiday was given to the school children in Tokyo. I was interested to know that they had waved the Japanese flag and the Canadian flag. I wondered just what Canadian flag they were waving as he passed through the streets of Tokyo. However, we will let that matter pass. Perhaps we shall be able to inquire into it on an occasion when we discuss some other features of the trip that one does not intend to refer to this afternoon.

I want to join with everyone else in the house in welcoming the Prime Minister back. 1 know I speak for all my colleagues. In fact, I know I speak for everyone in the house because already the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew) has spoken in the same strain. We welcome the Prime Minister back. We are glad that he looks so fit. We know that he has played an important part in bringing about a better understanding not only between Canada and the peoples of the Far East but between occidentals and orientals wherever they may be.

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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, may I hasten to say at the outset that I join with the other members of the house in extending to the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) a very hearty welcome on his return to this house and to say how pleased we are that he comes back looking so well. I know something of the rigours of the kind of travel he has been doing during these past several weeks. It was a difficult regimen under which he had to operate. I am sure we are glad to see him back in as good a state of health as he is now.

We followed each day the reports that were carried by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation of the journey which the Prime Minister took. During the first week or ten days after he left we found that the C.B.C. shared the spotlight between the Prime Minister's journey and that of the Queen and her royal consort down in New Zealand and Australia. But during the past two or three weeks I think that the Prime Minister and his progress pushed Her Majesty somewhat into the background so far as the reports of the C.B.C. were concerned.

Japanese friends in Tokyo sent me a sheaf of clippings telling of the Prime Minister's visit to Japan. I was very glad to see the enthusiasm with which his visit was received. On an occasion of this kind one is tempted to speak too long, but there were some heartening things in what the Prime Minister said this afternoon that I just cannot resist commenting on briefly. One of them was the

assurance that today it is felt that France is being run by Normans. Let me hasten to say that I too would think that country is in no serious danger as long as it is run by Normans. They tell me that there is only one thing harder than the head of a Norman and that is stone, so we have some hard-headed men in control of things in that country. That is what they need. I am told that these people trace their lineage back to the light-bearers of the tribe of Benjamin. I was glad to hear what the Prime Minister had to say about that country.

I was also very happy with his reference to the influence of the mother of parliaments in the countries of the East. I could not help thinking, while he was mentioning his visit to the people's parliament in New Delhi, what a wonderful contribution Great Britain has made in the matter of parliamentary government and how she has sown the seeds of that great institution over much of the world. That is a heartening thing.

It was heartening to me also that the Prime Minister should give us the assurance both in press interviews and here today that he feels there is a good chance that this old world can escape a global war for at least, as I think he said in one press interview, the length of his lifetime. I am of the opinion that the journey he has taken must have contributed somewhat to that understanding which will make it possible for us to enjoy a period of peace. I was glad to hear him finish his remarks today with the statement that he came back convinced that the state of preparedness in which we and our friends have got ourselves is of sufficient value to keep on doing it. I think that is right. I do not wish to take any more time now except to say once more that while some people may refer to the journey that the Prime Minister took as a pleasure-seeking junket I do not think that is right at all. I am convinced that he has been able to do immeasurable good as a consequence of the arduous journey which he took around the world.

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LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. Mclvor:

On a question of privilege-

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PC

Julian Harcourt Ferguson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. H. Ferguson (Simcoe North):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to speak as a Canadian. I think the Prime Minister's (Mr. St. Laurent) tour around the world was a most historic event.

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LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Although I hesitate very much to do so on this occasion, may I tell the hon. member that there is a ruling to the effect that on motions following a statement by a minister only one representative of each of the three opposition parties shall speak. I understand that this is a different occasion but I should like

Prime Minister's World Tour to say that if I allow the hon. member to speak I will have to allow all hon. members. I should like hon. members to be reasonable because we must carry on with our business.

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PC

Julian Harcourt Ferguson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Ferguson:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I believe the Prime Minister's tour has been one of the most historic events that we in Canada have ever seen. It is one of the finest things in which we have ever participated. We Canadians are at times too prone to believe that there are very few countries the equal of Canada. Quite possibly that is because of the great country in which we live and the tremendous opportunities all Canadians have. But irrespective of who the man may be and the position he may occupy in the dominion, he cannot really visualize the things he needs to know about countries with which we are now coming in contact almost daily unless he takes a trip similar to that of the Prime Minister.

I am sure that the government will agree with me when I say that in order for both sides of the House of Commons to get a true picture-and I suggest this without introducing any political feeling-the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew) should be afforded the same opportunity so that he could see with his own eyes the things he should see to be able to be the leader of Her Majesty's loyal opposition with full knowledge and so that he might be able to speak intelligently on matters pertaining to the welfare of Canada and the world. I say that with all sincerity, and I believe if the question were put to a vote the house would agree that it is a sensible and sane suggestion from the point of view of better government and the general betterment of Canada and the countries with which we associate.

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THE BUDGET

March 18, 1954