December 10, 1953

PRIVILEGE

MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION

LIB

Elmore Philpott

Liberal

Mr. Elmore Philpott (Vancouver South):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a point of privilege. On Saturday, December 5, the Toronto Globe and Mail referred to me as follows in its leading editorial:

The Liberals prefer the gag and the blindfold. Some of them, particularly those from western ridings, must have agreed with the Social Credit motion; for example, Mr. Elmore Philpott, Liberal member for Vancouver South, who has long demanded that Canada accept sterling . . . They stayed in line. Such docility damages parliament. It weakens public interest in, and respect for, parliament. It will do the greatest harm, in the long run, to the Liberal party itself.

In the above quotation, Mr. Speaker, the Globe and Mail was chiding western Liberals in general and myself in particular for not having voted for a Social Credit subamendment. But in its very next issue, on Monday, December 7, the Globe and Mail said:

The acceptance of sterling funds in payment for United Kingdom . . . imports from Canada ... is a question of vital importance ... It is unfortunate that opposition amendments were so ineptly phrased and argued that the government was given complete justification for sidetracking the whole issue for the time being. The Social Credit subamendment would have committed Canada to bearing the entire burden of sterling convertibility; it asked nothing less than that this country should accept sterling from any buyer abroad who tendered it as payment for any purchases from us . . . Economic ignorance and a deficient understanding of the functions of an opposition combined to produce this masterpiece of parliamentary incompetence. It had the effect of-[DOT]

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. I shall have to ask the member to state his question of privilege.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink
LIB

Elmore Philpott

Liberal

Mr. Philpott:

Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The reasons I voted against the subamendment are precisely those given in the Globe and Mail itself only two days after it castigated me for not having voted for what two days later it called "this masterpiece of parliamentary incompetence". It is true, Mr. Speaker, that I have long been and still am a believer-

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink
LIB

Louis-René Beaudoin (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order. The hon. member has stated his question of privilege. He must not make a speech.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink
LIB

Elmore Philpott

Liberal

Mr. Philpott:

Thank you, sir. Just six more lines.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink
LIB

Elmore Philpott

Liberal

Mr. Philpott:

Naturally I am flattered by the Globe and Mail's eagerness to have me make a speech in parliament. I think it was the hon. member for Quebec South (Mr. Power) who advised me that a newcomer should be seen more and heard less. As an old-time Globe editor myself, when it was a straight Liberal paper, I could make allowances for any editor, because I know there are some Monday mornings when he cannot remember what he wrote the preceding Saturday.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   MR. PHILPOTT NEWSPAPER COMMENT ON POSITION TAKEN IN HOUSE DIVISION
Permalink

EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

IGOR GOUZENKO

LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Stuart S. Garson (Minister of Justice):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members will recall that my colleague the Secretary of State for External Affairs (Mr. Pearson) made a statement in this house on November 25 last concerning the request of the United States government to make Mr. Igor Gouzenko available for questioning.

At that time Mr. Pearson tabled the exchange of notes which had taken place between the state department and the Canadian embassy in Washington on this subject. Since my colleague's statement, the United States government have accepted the terms set forth in the Canadian embassy's note of November 25 to the state department, namely that any such meeting with Mr. Gouzenko should take place under Canadian auspices and would be presided over by a Canadian who would rule on procedures, and that no part of the evidence or information secured from the meeting, however recorded, would be made public without the approval of the Canadian government.

The Secretary of State of the United States has informed the Canadian government that he has designated Senator Jenner and Mr. Robert Morris as representatives of the United States government to attend such a meeting.

External Affairs

Subsequent to receiving the agreement of the United States government to our proposals, I communicated by letter with Mr. Gouzenko, who has now replied that he is prepared to meet the representatives of the United States government on the terms already agreed between the United States and Canadian governments.

In view of the confidential nature of the meeting, I am sure the house will agree that it would be undesirable to say anything further on this matter at the present time.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   IGOR GOUZENKO
Sub-subtopic:   REPRESENTATIVES
Permalink

ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY REPORTED DIFFER- ENCES BETWEEN REPRESENTATIVES OF CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES

LIB

Paul Joseph James Martin (Minister of National Health and Welfare)

Liberal

Hon. Paul Martin (Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, the other day the hon. member for Eglinton (Mr. Fleming) asked the Secretary of State for External Affairs whether he would care to comment on a press report to the effect that differences of opinion had developed between Canadian and American representatives in the international joint commission in relation to the St. Lawrence seaway project.

So far as the government is able to ascertain, no differences of opinion between Canadian and American representatives on the international joint commission have developed in this matter. I assume the hon. member refers to the St. Lawrence power project since the waterway aspect is not under consideration by the commission.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   ST. LAWRENCE WATERWAY REPORTED DIFFER- ENCES BETWEEN REPRESENTATIVES OF CANADA AND THE UNITED STATES
Permalink

POST OFFICE ACT

PC

J.-Wilfrid Dufresne

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. W. Dufresne (Quebec West) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 76, to amend the Post Office Act.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE ACT
Sub-subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PREVENT DISTRIBUTION OF SUBVERSIVE MATERIAL
Permalink
?

Some hon. Members:

Explain.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE ACT
Sub-subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PREVENT DISTRIBUTION OF SUBVERSIVE MATERIAL
Permalink
PC

J.-Wilfrid Dufresne

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Dufresne:

Mr. Speaker, the purpose of the bill is to prevent the distribution through the royal mail of subversive propaganda from the communist party of Canada and also the Labour-Progressive party of Canada.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   POST OFFICE ACT
Sub-subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PREVENT DISTRIBUTION OF SUBVERSIVE MATERIAL
Permalink

TELEGRAPHS ACT

LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport) moved

the first reading of Bill No. 30 (from the Senate), to amend the Telegraphs Act.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   TELEGRAPHS ACT
Sub-subtopic:   APPLICATION OF PART III CONCERNING MARINE ELECTRIC TELEGRAPH COMPANIES
Permalink

December 10, 1953