April 17, 1953

CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR

MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT

LIB

Frederick Gordon Bradley (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. F. G. Bradley (Secretary of State):

On Monday last, April 13, the hon. member for Royal (Mr. Brooks) asked me if the government had arranged to meet representatives of the national council of Canadian prisoners of war and if so when such meeting was to take place. I only received notice of the question as I came into the house and did not have the relevant details. During the last few days I have been absent from the house but I would now like to answer the question by saying that my colleague, the Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Lapointe), received representatives of the national council of Canadian prisoners of war on February 18 last, after which he brought their representations before the government. After a great deal of consideration I was authorized to address a letter to the secretary of the national council of Canadian prisoners of war, a copy of which I now table.

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

May I ask the Secretary of

State a supplementary question concerning the reply which he has just given to the question of the hon. member for Royal? Has consideration been given to the recent request of that association that a committee of theirs be given an interview with a committee of three members of the cabinet?

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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LIB

Frederick Gordon Bradley (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Bradley:

Some days ago three members of the organization did call at my office, and asked me if I would give consideration to a further interview in connection with these matters. After giving some consideration to the subject I came to the conclusion that, unless there was some further material which had not been submitted, no good result would be served by any further conferences with the government, and I advised this organization accordingly.

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Maclnnis:

May I ask a further supplementary question? As this letter is in answer to a question asked on the orders of the day could it not be printed in today's Hansard as part of the minister's reply?

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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LIB

Frederick Gordon Bradley (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Bradley:

I have no objection.

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Is that agreeable to hon.

members?

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

(For text of letter, see appendix, pages 4070-71.)

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   MEETING OF REPRESENTATIVES OF NATIONAL COUNCIL WITH GOVERNMENT
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Joseph-Arthur Bradette

Liberal

Mr. J. A. Bradeile (Cochrane):

Mr. Speaker, I would like to address a request to the Secretary of State for External affairs (Mr. Pearson), of which I gave him notice.

Would the minister care to comment on the important statement made by President Eisenhower yesterday on the subject of world peace?

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR MINISTERIAL COMMENT ON STATEMENT BY PRESIDENT EISENHOWER
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, the president's statement to which the hon. member has referred is, I think, an inspiring and heartening declaration of the specific purposes and policies of the United States and as such it is of very great importance indeed. With the consent of the house it might be useful if I did put on the record one or two sentences from that statement because I think they embody principles to which we would be glad to subscribe in this house and in this country.

The president emphasized in his statement the "readiness of the free nations to welcome sincerely any genuine evidence of peaceful purpose enabling all peoples again to resume their common quest of just peace." Then he went on to state in this connection that a new leadership has assumed power in the Soviet union. "This new leadership," he said, "confronts a free world aroused, as rarely in its history, by the will to stay free," and "this free world knows-out of the bitter wisdom of experience-that vigilance and sacrifice are the price of liberty." Mr. Eisenhower then added:

This is the kind of free world which the new Soviet leadership confronts. It is a world that demands and expects the fullest respect of its rights and interests. It is a world that will always accord the same respect to all others.

The president stated that "the first great step along this way must be the conclusion of an honourable armistice in Korea," and that "this means the immediate cessation of

4006

Inquiries of the Ministry hostilities and the prompt initiation of political discussions leading to the holding of free elections in a united Korea." In that connection, Mr. Speaker, some additional hope has been given to the possibility.,, at least, of an armistice taking place by a unanimous decision of the United Nations political committee yesterday on a resolution on this subject.

The president went on to indicate in eloquent words that "the peace we seek, founded upon decent trust and co-operative effort among nations, can be fortified not by weapons of war but by wheat and by cotton; by milk and by wool; by meat and by timber and by rice. These are words that translate into every language on earth. These are needs that challenge this world in arms. This idea of a just and peaceful world is not new or strange to us." Then Mr. Eisenhower made a proposal which must, I am sure, arouse the interest of all peoples, to the effect that the United States government "is ready to ask its people to join with all nations in devoting a substantial percentage of the savings achieved by disarmament to a fund for world aid and reconstruction. The purposes of this great work," he added, "would be to help other peoples to develop the undeveloped areas of the world, to stimulate profitable and fair world trade, to assist all peoples to know the blessings of productive freedom." He said:

I know of nothing I can add to make plainer the sincere purpose of the United States.

This statement of purpose which I have just mentioned is one to which I am sure, Mr. Speaker, this house and the people of Canada would be glad indeed to subscribe.

Topic:   CANADIAN PRISONERS OF WAR
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   REQUEST FOR MINISTERIAL COMMENT ON STATEMENT BY PRESIDENT EISENHOWER
Permalink

INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT

STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE


On the orders of the day:


PC

Lewis Elston Cardiff

Progressive Conservative

Mr. L. E. Cardiff (Huron North):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce which relates to a press report appearing in this morning's Globe and Mail in which the minister is reported as having said he had no intention of making a special trip to London in an attempt to get Britain's approval of the new international wheat agreement. Does the minister not consider the signing of the wheat agreement by Britain as of vital importance to Canada and the Canadian farmer?

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Righi Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I subscribe to that statement and consider it is important to Canada that Britain does sign the wheat agreement. I believe also, however, that we

in Canada must make our decision and Britain has to make hers. I know of no new facts that I could put before the British government if I went to Britain. All we Canadians could do during the long negotiations was - to make the facts known and let the United Kingdom government reach its own decision.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

I

should like to ask a supplementary question arising out of the reply the minister has given. Would he be prepared to comment on a story appearing in yesterday's Winnipeg Free Press, which reads:

As matters stand at present Canada Is entitled to sell 250 million bushels to participating countries and the United States 270 million bushels, in a total market which includes Britain.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Order.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL WHEAT AGREEMENT
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OF MINISTER OF TRADE AND COMMERCE
Permalink

April 17, 1953