March 31, 1953

THE LATE QUEEN MARY

OBSERVANCE OF PERIOD OF SILENCE

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

This morning, as hon. members know, the funeral service of our late dearly beloved Queen Mary was conducted at Windsor by the Archbishop of Canterbury. The Prime Minister and the Leader of the Opposition have suggested to me that it would be fitting if, before the business of the day is entered upon, hon. members would rise for a few minutes of silence.

Whereupon the house rose in silence.

Topic:   THE LATE QUEEN MARY
Subtopic:   OBSERVANCE OF PERIOD OF SILENCE
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THE ROYAL ASSENT

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received the following communication:

Government House.

Ottawa, March 30, 1953

Sir:

I have the honour to inform you that the Right Honourable Thibaudeau Rinfret, Chief Justice of Canada, acting as deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, will proceed to the Senate chamber on Tuesday, the 31st March, at 5.45 p.m., for the purpose of giving the royal assent to certain bills.

I have the honour to be, sir,

Your obedient servant,

J. F. Delaute,

Secretary to the Governor General.

(Administrative)

Topic:   THE ROYAL ASSENT
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RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES


Seventh report of standing committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines.-Mr. McCulloch.


SIR ROBERT BORDEN

ERECTION OF STATUE ON PARLIAMENT HILL

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. Si. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Hon. members, I believe, will be interested in a report on the progress made since I announced on February 5 that it is the intention of the government to recommend the erection of a statue to mark the services to Canada of the late Sir Robert Borden.

Since that time the matter has been carefully considered by the board of trustees of the National Gallery of Canada and I now have their recommendation, which has been concurred in by the government.

It is proposed to have the design selected as the result of a competition which will be open to sculptors normally resident in Canada. The base is to be of stone or granite and the figure, which is to be standing, is to be of bronze. The dimensions of the statue will toe similar to those of the statue to the late Sir Wilfrid Laurier on the grounds of the parliament buildings. The announcement of the competition is being made immediately and it is hoped that the closing date for designs may be set early in the summer so that the statue may be completed in time for unveiling next year on the 100th anniversary of Sir Robert Borden's birth. The cost is estimated at between $40,000 and $50,000.

The winner of the competition, of course, will be awarded the contract for the statue, but in order to promote interest among sculptors and also so that not all but one will spend time on producing a design at a loss to themselves, it is proposed to make six additional cash awards of $300 to the six sculptors whose designs are considered most meritorious following the winning design.

Steps will be taken to announce the competition widely through Canada and I am hopeful that the designs which will be produced will be of high quality and in keeping with the service rendered to Canada by the man who was prime minister during the difficult days of world war I.

Topic:   SIR ROBERT BORDEN
Subtopic:   ERECTION OF STATUE ON PARLIAMENT HILL
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, on Friday last the

hon. member for Peel (Mr. Graydon) inquired about a report that had been published in the newspapers attributing to the Canadian ambassador to Colombia a statement that Canada might eventually join the PanAmerican Union if the union tendered such an invitation, and he inquired whether there had been any change in the government's policy. The answer will be found in Hansard of Friday, March 27, at page 3341. He then

Newfoundland

asked whether the department would inquire of the ambassador whether this report of the statement attributed to him was correct or not, and I told him that an inquiry had already been sent to the ambassador. The department received on Saturday the answer which I would have communicated yesterday had the hon. member been in his seat. It is as follows:

Bid not say Canada would accept invitation if tendered but question of pressmen was whether partnership in commonwealth was obstacle to joining because of link to crown and reply was that there existed no constitutional or juridical impediment since Canada as independent nation is free to determine own policy regarding membership in any international or regional organization as shown by membership in many such. Definitely did not, repeat not, say that Canada might eventually join if invited. Local press correctly interpreted sense of my words as clippings to be airmailed shortly will bear out and I cannot understand how different meaning was conveyed to Canadian newspapers unless press news agency misunderstood, because whole press conference in Spanish without interpreters. Incidentally press conference was great success eliciting in all papers testimony of most gratifying liking and admiration for Canada. Colombians all wonderfully friendly.

Topic:   SIR ROBERT BORDEN
Subtopic:   EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
Sub-subtopic:   PAN-AMERICAN UNION STATEMENT BY CANADIAN AMBASSADOR TO COLOMBIA
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NEWFOUNDLAND

FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION

PC

Gordon Francis Higgins

Progressive Conservative

Mr. G. F. Higgins (Si. John's East):

Mr. Speaker, may I have your indulgence for a moment. As it is March 31, 1954, I believe possibly-

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION
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?

Some hon. Members:

1953.

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION
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PC

Gordon Francis Higgins

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Higgins:

1953 is right. I thought I might say 1954 and then it might be remembered. As it is quite possible that the snow will fly before the next parliament meets and that this is the last parliament that some of us from Newfoundland may be in, I should like to say on behalf of the Newfoundland members of parliament, on this fourth anniversary, how happy we have been in this parliament and to convey to you, sir, our sincere thanks for your kindness to all of us.

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION
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PC

William Joseph Browne

Progressive Conservative

Mr. W. J. Browne (St. John's West):

Mr. Speaker, I wonder whether I might make a few remarks in addition to those which have been made by my colleague the hon. member for St. John's East (Mr. Higgins).

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION
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?

Some hon. Members:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION
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PC

William Joseph Browne

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Browne (St. John's West):

As I have not been here on any other occasion when this anniversary came around, I think I may also claim the indulgence of the house. If I may be permitted to do so, I should like to make a personal reference. As some hon. members may know, 1 was in the party opposed to confederation. Although I was

not free and in politics at the time but was in the government service, I did not wish to see confederation. Four years ago today I was in the city of London, England, and I bought all the morning newspapers to see what they had to say about what was taking place. Most of them had nothing to say whatever; there were two or three references to the act of union that was being consummated, and one expressed regret and said that it was too bad to see an old dominion going out of existence.

I felt extremely sad at that time, and there were many others in Newfoundland who felt as I did. Since that time I have come to regard the situation' in a different light. After having been proud of our almost continuous association with England since 1497, and having been boastful of the fact that we were England's oldest colony, to be cut adrift like that without a word hurt a great many of us. But now we see that England had her own problems and that probably what she was doing then was being cruel in order to be kind. On this side of the water there was rejoicing and I personally received, from friends I had made here when I was for four years at the University of Toronto, an extremely cordial welcome into the union which I did not appreciate then as much as I have appreciated it since. Time has dissipated to a great extent the sadness which I then felt, and I am inclined to think that the majority of people who felt as I did in 1949 feel much as I do now. We were inclined to think then that it was a forced union, and I am not inclined to differ from that opinion yet; but still I believe it was to our mutual advantage.

I have heard here many nice references to our country, and I appreciate them greatly. It is extremely interesting and nice to hear the glowing accounts which visitors to Newfoundland bring back as a result of their visits. The latest one I heard was that of the Minister of Transport (Mr. Chevrier); and I am glad to know that in the city of St. John's, where the majority of members are of a political persuasion different from his own-

Topic:   NEWFOUNDLAND
Subtopic:   FOURTH ANNIVERSARY OF ENTRANCE INTO CONFEDERATION
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March 31, 1953