March 25, 1953

THE LATE QUEEN MARY

ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND THE ROYAL FAMILY


Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, fifty-two years ago, on the 8th of February, 1901, our predecessors in this house adopted an address of condolence to their new king to express their sorrow at the loss of a great sovereign lady, Queen Victoria. Twenty-seven years ago, on the 19th of January, 1926, the house early in the proceedings of that session paid its last respects to another great queen, Queen Alexandra. The influence for good throughout the far-flung British empire, and indeed throughout the whole world, of these great sovereign ladies had been very remarkable and far-reaching. Today we meet to pay a respectful tribute to the memory of another great queen. All Canada mourns since last evening the passing of Queen Mary. Her Majesty's death will be a personal sorrow for Canadians, and indeed for all the peoples of the commonwealth. The wide scope of her work and influence can be measured, like that of her illustrious predecessors, by the universal admiration with which she was regarded. Her sympathy, kindness and graciousness over so many years have won all our hearts. During the long reign of King George V and afterward, Queen Mary devoted herself to the welfare of her peoples, particularly to those who had suffered in the two world wars. 1 know that countless Canadian servicemen and their families will always be grateful for her kindly and active interest. The memory of the late queen will long be cherished throughout Canada and all the nations of the commonwealth which she had personally visited on more than one occasion. The example of her family life, her great charity and dignity, will never be forgotten. The sympathy of the Canadian people will go, I am sure, in fullest measure to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, to the Queen Mother, to Princess Margaret and the other members of the Royal Family; and to express it in the traditional form I move, seconded by the Leader of the Opposition, that a humble address be presented to Her Majesty the Queen in the following words: To the Queen's Most Excellent Majesty: Most Gracious Sovereign: We, Your Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Canada, in parliament assembled, approach Your Majesty with the expression of our deep and heartfelt sorrow at the demise of Her Majesty Queen Mary. We mourn the loss of Her Majesty, whose kindness, graciousness and great influence for good over so many years won the respect and admiration of us all, and there has come to each of us a sense of personal bereavement which, we say it with all possible respect and duty, makes Your Majesty's sorrow our own. We pray that the God of consolation may comfort Your Majesty and the members of the Royal Family in your bereavement, and that Your Majesty may long be spared to continue the eminent public services of your great predecessors.


PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, in rising to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) in the motion adopting the address of sympathy to Her Majesty the Queen, I simply wish to add a few words to those in which the Prime Minister has expressed the sympathy of every one of us and the sympathy of Canadians generally to Her Gracious Majesty the Queen and to the members of the Royal Family in the loss of one very dear to them and dear to all of us.

I am sure that not one of us will ever in our lifetime forget a picture which appeared in the press just about a year ago. It was a picture of three queens standing together in mourning, with faces of tragic sorrow, watching the beloved body of a son, husband and father being carried to its last resting place. Now one of those queens is gone. She has been so much a part of the life of every one of us that it is still difficult to realize that she has passed from this mortal scene. If anyone in any other country should ask today why it is that with disappearing monarchies in many lands our monarchy still stands so firm and strong, I think the answer is to be found in the characteristics displayed by Queen Mary throughout the whole of her life.

Her life itself was the best example of those great qualities of heart and mind and spirit which have been identified with our thoughts of royality. Her life was one of constant devotion to duty. It was the duty of her life as a mother, as well as a queen, that established her position in the minds of all who knew her.

The late Queen Mary

I know that there are many in this house who recall as I do the dramatic scene in London in 1935 when King George V and Queen Mary passed through the streets of London at the time of their jubilee. I think it came as a revelation, even to the people of Britain and certainly to the rest of the world, to see the outpouring of affection on the part of the people who were there and which indicated the place that Queen Mary as well as King George V had taken in the heart of everyone.

I remember also after they had returned from St. Paul's cathedral and came out on the balcony of the palace there were two young girls beside them at that time. One of them is the present Queen. To her the sympathy of every Canadian goes out at this time because of a deep bond of affection which endeared her to all of us. We extend our sympathies not only to a queen but to the granddaughter of a woman who will always command the respect of everyone who loves decency and the traditions to which we adhere.

Topic:   THE LATE QUEEN MARY
Subtopic:   ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND THE ROYAL FAMILY
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, I am sure that all members of this house join in supporting this address. There are times in history when personalities often mark the end or the beginning of an era. With the passing of Her Majesty Queen Mary the last link with the Victorian era has been severed. That was the thought that came to my mind last evening when I learned that she had passed away.

All in this commonwealth, which in her lifetime was transformed from an empire into a commonwealth, revered this great lady, a wife, a mother and a queen. She was a stately figure whom we not only revered but recognized as a symbol of an age that has passed away.

In joining in support of this motion I do not think we can do better than to remember the great example of womanhood and motherhood that she gave to the people of the British commonwealth and the world.

Topic:   THE LATE QUEEN MARY
Subtopic:   ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND THE ROYAL FAMILY
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, the group for which I speak would like to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew) in support of the address that they have moved, and also to be associated with the tributes they have paid to England's grand old lady. I had the privilege of meeting Queen Mary at Buckingham Palace in 1948. At that time I did not find her to be the severe dowager that she was so often portrayed; I found her to be rather more a queen. I was struck by her kindness of heart, by her regal bearing and

by her remarkable self-discipline even although at that time she was eighty years of age.

Those who were well acquainted with Queen Mary say that she will be best remembered for her extreme neatness of mind and the probing thoroughness with which from the time she was a young girl she set about satisfying her intense curiosity about the world around her. Wherever she went or in whatever she was interested she brought order out of chaos and she gave unusual attention to little things.

Queen Mary was indeed a remarkable woman in many ways and she has left the imprint of her sterling character on the whole Royal Family. To us she had been for many years what others have so well referred to as a symbol of the royal idea in Britain, that come what may, the crown abides.

We join with all hon. members in this house in paying our deep respect to her blessed memory and in extending to the Royal Family our sincere sympathies in this time of their sorrow.

Topic:   THE LATE QUEEN MARY
Subtopic:   ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND THE ROYAL FAMILY
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

The house has heard the motion moved by the Prime Minister and seconded by the Leader of the Opposition. Will the house rise for a moment's silence? Whereupon the house rose in silence.

Topic:   THE LATE QUEEN MARY
Subtopic:   ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND THE ROYAL FAMILY
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Mr. St. Laurent:

I move, seconded by the Leader of the Opposition, that the address be engrossed.

Mr. Speaker, I further move, seconded by the Leader of the Opposition:

That a message be sent to the Senate informing Their Honours that this house has passed an Address to Her Most Excellent Majesty the Queen, expressing the deep regret and heartfelt sorrow of the house at the demise of Her Majesty the late Queen Mary, and requesting Their Honours to unite with this house in the said Address, and that the Clerk do carry that message to the Senate.

Topic:   THE LATE QUEEN MARY
Subtopic:   ADDRESS TO HER MAJESTY QUEEN ELIZABETH II AND THE ROYAL FAMILY
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Motions agreed to.


LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT

APPROVAL OF REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION

LIB

Howard Waldemar Winkler

Liberal

Mr. H. W. Winkler (Lisgar) moved:

That the report of the civil service commission respecting the organization of the library of parliament laid on the table of the house on Tuesday, March 24, 1953, be now approved.

Topic:   LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   APPROVAL OF REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
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Motion agreed to.


QUESTIONS


SURPLUS CROWN ASSETS-MISCELLANEOUS SCRAP Mr. Robichaud: 1. What are the particulars of the miscellaneous scrap sold to Sorel Industries Ltd., Sorel, Quebec, for $6,847.31, as surplus crown assets, as shown at page 16 of the Crown Assets Disposal Corporation report for 1951-1952? 2. Where was this miscellaneous scrap located at the time of the sale? 3. Were tenders invited for the purchase of the said scrap? 4. If so, what are the names, addresses and amounts of tender of each tenderer?


FISHERIES LANDINGS AND VALUES, DISTRICT D23, N.S.

LIB

Samuel Rosborough Balcom

Liberal

Mr. Balcom:

What were the fisheries landings and landed value by species for the years 1951 and 1952, district D23, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Peggy's Cove to Hubbards area)?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FISHERIES LANDINGS AND VALUES, DISTRICT D23, N.S.
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LIB

John Watson MacNaught (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. MacNaughl:

Species 1951 1952 Landings Landed Value Landings Landed ValueCwt. $ Cwt. $Cod 7,760 27,412 6,434 29,3842,699 13,420 2,619 13,7253,838 5,442 7,698 16,7521,213 1,934 859 1,55153 53 410 846 109 27328 440 6 12982 298 29 8256 8479 158 984 1,646 7,380 10,2128,967 31,986 5,238 38,64353 53 19 740 48 2,1821,276 8,871 1,202 7,9051,464 63,094 1,534 66,795103 645 82 17816 560 22 770Totals 29,044 157,598 33,316 188,668

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FISHERIES LANDINGS AND VALUES, DISTRICT D23, N.S.
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AIR FORCE STATION, TIGNISH, P.E.I.-SURPLUS BUILDINGS

PC

Mr. MacLean (Queens):

Progressive Conservative

1. Have the buildings at the air force station in Tignish, Prince Edward Island, been declared surplus?

2. If so, have they been sold?

3. Were they sold by tender?

4. If so, who was the successful tenderer, and what was the amount of the bid?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AIR FORCE STATION, TIGNISH, P.E.I.-SURPLUS BUILDINGS
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March 25, 1953