March 24, 1953

LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT

FIRST REPORT OF JOINT COMMITTEE, AND REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION RESPECTING ORGANIZATION

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to present a report of the civil service commission respecting the organization of the library of parliament, and also the first report of the joint committee on the library of parliament.

Topic:   LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   FIRST REPORT OF JOINT COMMITTEE, AND REPORT OF CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION RESPECTING ORGANIZATION
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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 229, to incorporate CanadianDisaster Relief Fund, Incorporated.-Mr. Weir.Bill No. 231, for the relief of Rolande Jacqueline Lortie Nugent.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 232, for the relief of Alice Cecilia Anne Magniac Parker.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 233, for the relief of Therese Monette Lax.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 234, for the relief of Paul Edward Tremblay. Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 235, for the relief of Maurice Leveille. Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 236, for the relief of Bernard Gordon Smith.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 237, for the relief of Anne O'Connor Shapiro.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 238, for the relief of Beryl Mildred Taylor Leckie.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 239, for the relief of Eileen Margaret Amos Trudeau.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 240, for the relief of Florence Mae Mitchell Anderson.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 241, for the relief of Sidney William Donald Butler.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 242, for the relief of Adele Roberta Jeffrey.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 243, for the relief of Margaret Bell Favreau.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 244, for the relief of Lena Herman Besner.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 245, for the relief of Muriel Luella Sproston Kerr.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 246, for the relief of Ruth Steirman Fernley.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 247, for the relief of Milorad Aragian.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 248, for the relief of Kenneth Angus Eaton Hewitt.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 249, for the relief of Delia Fleurette Ayotte Martin.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 250, for the relief of Clarence Albert Edwards.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 251, for the relief of Issie Adler.- Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 252, for the relief of Jean Shelvingiton Parnell Adams.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 253, for the relief of Peggy Louise Miller McCallum.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 254, for the relief of Jean Paul Gauthier.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 255, for the relief of Bernice Catherine MacDonald Crawford.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 256, for the relief of Horst Wilhelm Wossidlo.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 257, for the relief of Nick Sauchuk.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 258, for the relief of Rita Frost Siversky.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 259, for the relief of Beatrice Gotlieb Slobotsky.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 260, for the relief of Georgina Julia Rose Charland.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 261, for the relief of Margaret Violet Creasor McKenna.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 262, for the relief of Kathleen Snell Meloche. Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 263, for the relief of Henry George Maxham. Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 264, for the relief of Marjorie Evelyn Lee Stevens.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 265, for the relief of Queenie Isabel Brambell Muchan.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 266, for the relief of Bessie Mabel Witcomb Elson.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 267, for the relief of Catherine Maine McKenzie Woods.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 268, for the relief of Robert Edward Francis Clements.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 269, for the relief of Agnes Jackson Stroud Earle.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 270, for the relief of Mary Elizabeth Irene Gray Brideau.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 271, for the relief of Marie Claire Marcelle Suzanne Langlois Crowe, otherwise known as Marie Claire Marcelle Suzanne Langlois CockelL-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 272, for the relief of Janina Jenny Spaiches Remeikis.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 273, for the relief of Ruth Sanel Koilofsky.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 274, for the relief of Pauline Tratenberg Goldman.-Mr. Winkler. 3230 HOUSE OF Inquiries of the Ministry Bill No. 275, for (the relief of Molly Klau Lust.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 276, for the relief of Charlotte Freeman Pelletier.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 277, for the relief of Olive Spencer Thompson.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 278, for the relief of Dorothy Sanger Anderson Morris.-Mr. Winkler.


FISHERIES

PURCHASE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNED SALMON BY BRITISH GOVERNMENT


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Edward Turney Applewhaite

Liberal

Mr. E. T. Applewhaile (Skeena):

I wish to direct a question to the Minister of Fisheries. Can the minister report any progress in the negotiations with the British for the sale of the present carryover of canned salmon in British Columbia?

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   PURCHASE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNED SALMON BY BRITISH GOVERNMENT
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LIB

James Sinclair (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. James Sinclair (Minister of Fisheries):

Mr. Speaker, the British Columbia salmon canners have always sold a substantial part of their pack to commonwealth markets, the United Kingdom in particular. They have been good customers for many years. This year, because of dollar shortages, no orders have been placed by the United Kingdom for canned salmon. The B. C. salmon industry has managed, through aggressive advertising and salesmanship, to increase sales in Canada, the United States and western Europe, but is still left with a carryover of around half a million cases. This situation was discussed with the British chancellor of the exchequer, Right Hon. R. A. Butler, on his recent visit to Ottawa. Mr. Butler was most sympathetic, and promised to discuss the matter with his government on his return to Britain.

I am happy to report today that the British chancellor has now advised us that the British ministry of food has been authorized to make a purchase of British Columbia canned salmon to the value of $4| million. The ministry of food will choose the type and quality desired. While there are no conditions attached to this agreement, Mr. Butler did express the hope that our fishing industry would reciprocate by increasing their purchases of British goods-tinplate, nets and engines in particular. As Minister of Fisheries I strongly support this suggestion, for it is only by expanding trade that the British can earn the dollars for future purchases of our products.

Topic:   FISHERIES
Subtopic:   PURCHASE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA CANNED SALMON BY BRITISH GOVERNMENT
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INCREASE IN CARAPACE MEASUREMENT OF LOBSTERS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

John Watson MacNaught (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. J. Watson MacNaughi (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Fisheries):

Yes-

Topic:   INCREASE IN CARAPACE MEASUREMENT OF LOBSTERS
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS AT VANCOUVER


On the orders of the day:


PC

Douglas Scott Harkness

Progressive Conservative

Mr. D. S. Harkness (Calgary East):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Labour. Can the Minister of Labour give us a report on the present situation with respect to the grain handlers' strike at Vancouver? Particularly, will he tell us what steps, if any, the government are taking to put an end to this strike which has been so costly to the farmers of western Canada?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS AT VANCOUVER
Sub-subtopic:   SITUATION AT LAKEHEAD
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LIB

Milton Fowler Gregg (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. Milton F. Gregg (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday I gave the house a statement concerning the strike of grain handlers on the west coast and in that statement I reported that, following the rejection by both parties of the compromise proposal submitted by my officer, arrangements had been made for a joint meeting of the representatives of the parties in a further effort to bring them into agreement. The joint discussions initiated by my officer were held on Thursday and Friday of last week. While agreement appeared possible on all other issues, the parties were adamant on the question of a wage increase. The companies would offer no wage increase and the union desired a "substantial" wage increase, with no figure being specified.

In the circumstances the parties agreed that no useful purpose would be served by continuing the joint discussions and my officer regretfully was forced to comply and made arrangements to leave Vancouver. Before leaving, however, he addressed a joint letter to the representatives of the parties proposing that two of the issues be arbitrated, that four other issues be made the subject of a collective agreement, and that work be resumed immediately on acceptance of the proposals which were in the following terms:

1. That the parties agree to submit to arbitration the following issues: (a) The wage rate; and (b) the dust premium, with an

arbitrator, whose decision would be final and binding, being chosen by agreement between the parties or, failing agreement, by the Minister of Labour for Canada.

2. That the parties incorporate in a collective agreement the following provisions: (a) Two additional statutory holidays; (b) an increase of five cents per hour in the present graveyard shift differential; (c) the payment of double time for all work done on Sundays; and (d) schedules of job classifications, without prejudice to the right of the management of each elevator to establish its own system of classification.

3. That the parties agree that the present cessation of work be terminated and that work be resumed at the earliest possible time following acceptance of the proposal herein contained.

Then I quote from the end of the letter as follows:

Would you please place this proposal before the parties and give me your reply by letter as soon as possible.

The parties are now giving consideration to this arbitration proposal.

If I may, Mr. Speaker, in view of the fact that there seems to be some belief that certain difficulties at the head of the lakes are directly related to those in British Columbia, I should like to make a brief statement with regard to the head of the lakes. Many hon. members have asked me about the recent newspaper reports indicating that certain differences of opinion had arisen at the lakehead between the grain elevator companies and the union representing their employees which resulted in a strike vote having been taken. My department was advised of this situation late Friday evening of last week and immediate inquiries were made to obtain the facts.

Hon. members may recollect that contract negotiations were conducted in Winnipeg and Port Arthur in the early part of September last year between representatives of the elevator companies and of the brotherhood of railway and steamship clerks, etc., with which the elevator employees are affiliated. One of the issues in dispute at that time was the request of the brotherhood for a five-day forty-hour week. The parties agreed at that time to reduce the hours from forty-eight to forty per week but apparently there is a difference of opinion between them now concerning the application of the forty-hour week.

My department acted immediately to bring the parties into conference with a view to the settlement of this issue. I should like to add that there is no connection between this dispute at the lakehead and the strike 68108-205

Inquiries of the Ministry of grain elevator employees on the west coast. Some of the same companies are involved in the two disputes but the employees are represented by different unions.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS AT VANCOUVER
Sub-subtopic:   SITUATION AT LAKEHEAD
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PC

Douglas Scott Harkness

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Harkness:

Is the government prepared to use the emergency powers they now possess in order to bring the Vancouver strike to an end? After all, it has been going on now for more than five weeks.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STRIKE OF GRAIN HANDLERS AT VANCOUVER
Sub-subtopic:   SITUATION AT LAKEHEAD
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March 24, 1953