March 2, 1953

DIPLOMATIC INSTRUMENT

TABLING OF COPIES OF CONVENTION BETWEEN CANADA AND UNITED STATES PRESERVATION OF HALIBUT FISHERY


Righl Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, I should like to lay on the table copies of the convention between Canada and the United States of America for the preservation of the halibut fishery of the northern Pacific ocean and Bering sea, signed at Ottawa today. This happens to be the thirtieth anniversary of the signature for the first time of a treaty on behalf of Canada by Canadians alone. That was the original halibut convention with the United States signed by the late Right Hon. Ernest Lapointe on March 2, 1923. It seemed fitting that this renewal treaty should be signed by the present Minister of Fisheries (Mr. Sinclair) and also by the present Minister of Veterans Affairs (Mr. Lapointe), the son of the signatory of this former treaty in 1923.


LIB

Edward Turney Applewhaite

Liberal

Mr. Applewhaite:

Mr. Speaker, may I be permitted to ask a question with respect to the statement just made by the Prime Minister in view of the importance of this matter to my constituency and to the Pacific coast. Would it be possible to ask the Minister of Fisheries to indicate what has been accomplished under the treaty and the changes in the new one?

Topic:   DIPLOMATIC INSTRUMENT
Subtopic:   TABLING OF COPIES OF CONVENTION BETWEEN CANADA AND UNITED STATES PRESERVATION OF HALIBUT FISHERY
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LIB

James Sinclair (Minister of Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. James Sinclair (Minister of Fisheries):

The principal achievement, so far as our fishermen are concerned, is in the end result. In 1923 this great fishery on the west coast produced only 15 million pounds of halibut in a full year's fishing by the fleets of both nations. Last year, after thirty years of scientific study and conservation, 62 million pounds were produced by the two fleets in just two months' fishing; that is four times the amount of fish produced in just one-sixth of the time.

A second and equally important result has been the fact that this treaty, which was the first international fisheries treaty in all the world, having been so successful, has been copied by this country and other countries. Here in Canada we have had a succession of international fisheries treaties

all of which are proving extremely successful; they include the international salmon convention for the west coast, the sealing convention and the whaling convention, and the new northwest Atlantic fisheries treaty signed by ten nations to conserve codfish on the Grand Banks. It is because of the fact that we now have several international fisheries treaties that it has been necessary to make the first change in the treaty. The previous treaty was simply called the international fishing convention. There was no other when it was first signed. Now it is to be called the international Pacific halibut convention in order to distinguish it from the other treaties. The United States minister this morning commented on the fact that his country also had used it as a model for other international fisheries treaties they had signed.

The second change is in the number of commissioners. Up till now there were two commissioners from Canada and two from the United States. These commissioners are not paid. In the United States fishing is under the states rather than under the federal government, and the Americans are anxious to give Alaska representation on this commission. So the United States commissioners will represent the federal government, the state of Washington and Alaska. We have agreed, so that each country will have three commissioners.

The only other change is in the open season. The past convention called for one open season and one closed season each year. The scientists' belief is that there are some grounds which could be better utilized if there were different open seasons, and the new convention permits different open seasons to be declared in these great fisheries.

Topic:   DIPLOMATIC INSTRUMENT
Subtopic:   TABLING OF COPIES OF CONVENTION BETWEEN CANADA AND UNITED STATES PRESERVATION OF HALIBUT FISHERY
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CANADA SHIPPING ACT

AMENDMENTS RESPECTING STEAM AND MOTOR ENGINEER CERTIFICATES, RADIOTELEGRAPH INSTALLATIONS, ETC.

LIB

Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Alphonse Fournier (for ihe Minister of Transport) moved

the first reading of Bill No. 191 (from the Senate), to amend the Canada Shipping Act, 1934.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Questions PRIVATE BILLS

Topic:   CANADA SHIPPING ACT
Subtopic:   AMENDMENTS RESPECTING STEAM AND MOTOR ENGINEER CERTIFICATES, RADIOTELEGRAPH INSTALLATIONS, ETC.
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FIRST READINGS

SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 192, for the relief of Mary Rose Anne Rihel Kowalski.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 193, for the relief of Walter Critch.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 194, for the relief of Edwin George Godden.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 195, for the relief of Lottie Mendelman Brand.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 196, for the relief of Jacob Titsch.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 197, for the relief of Andrew Percy Bell.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 198, for the relief of Eileen Doris Martin Martin.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 199, for the relief of Annie Moulard Cumming Wright.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 200, for the relief of William James Dunn.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 201, for the relief of Jean Marion Oickle Joudrey.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 202, for the relief of Alena Estella Welch Ball.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 203, for the relief of Elizabeth Rogers Guerin.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 204, for the relief of Richard Alfred Sutton.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 205, for the relief of Doris Edgar Choquette.-Mr. Winkler.


QUESTIONS

LUCAS-ROTAX FACTORY, TORONTO

PC

Mr. Harkness:

Progressive Conservative

1. Is the Lucas-Rotax factory, in the Toronto suburb of Scarborough, manufacturing parts for the Orenda engine?

2. If so, what capital assistance, if any, has been extended by the government?

3. Was this capital assistance for construction of the plant or for tooling up?

2. Province NavyQuebec $ 92,749.54Ontario

69,041.20Manitoba

5,003.76Saskatchewan

3,533.90Alberta

6,357.47New Brunswick

2,882.42Nova Scotia

4,358.19Newfoundland

1,236.74British Columbia

11,455.40Prince Edward Island... 843.14

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   LUCAS-ROTAX FACTORY, TORONTO
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LIB

Mr. Dickey:

Liberal

1. Yes. Fuel systems.

2. $5,794,104.

3. Construction $2,630,678. Equipment and installation $3,163,426.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   LUCAS-ROTAX FACTORY, TORONTO
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A. V. ROE LIMITED' CAPITAL ASSISTANCE

PC

Mr. Harkness:

Progressive Conservative

1. what is the total amount of capital assistance which has been extended by the government to A. V. Roe Canada Limited?

2. What is the breakdown of this as between (a)

Orenda engine; (b) CF-100 airframe; (c) other

capital assistance, and what for?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   A. V. ROE LIMITED' CAPITAL ASSISTANCE
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LIB

Mr. Dickey:

Liberal

2. $63,453,946.

2. (a) $52,148,000; (b) $11,305,946; (c)

Nil.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   A. V. ROE LIMITED' CAPITAL ASSISTANCE
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NATIONAL DEFENCE RECRUITING

ADVERTISING

March 2, 1953