January 28, 1953

MAIN ESTIMATES, 1953-54


A message from His Excellency the Governor General transmitting estimates for the financial year ending March 31, 1954, was presented by Hon. Douglas Abbott (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


LABOUR CONDITIONS

STATEMENT ON THREATENED RAILWAY STRIKE

LIB

Milton Fowler Gregg (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. Milion F. Gregg (Minister of Labour):

In view of the importance of the matter, Mr. Speaker, may I make a brief statement to the house concerning the present railway dispute. Since the short statement I made a week ago today, hon. members will have seen reports in the press of the various meetings on the part of the negotiating committees in Montreal. They will have noted also from these reports that serious efforts were being made to find a solution to the problem. You will note that last night wires were sent to me from both groups of committees, outlining the discussions yesterday which indicated that some progress had been made but stating that they were not able to continue negotiations last night.

In acknowledging those wires this morning I decided that, rather than do so by sending a wire, I would telephone the leaders of the negotiating committees and ask them again if they could not find a solution by free collective bargaining. If I may be permitted, sir, I shall read to the house my summary, which I think is a fair one, of the message I conveyed, on the one hand to Mr. A. J. Kelly, who is associated with Mr. L. C. Malone on behalf of the men- Mr. Malone was near Mr. Kelly when I telephoned-and on the other hand to Mr. Donald Gordon, president of the Canadian National Railways, who was in consultation with Mr. W. A. Mather, president of the Canadian Pacific Railway, when I telephoned between 11 and 11.30 this morning. My summary is as follows:

Your wire of 27th January is acknowledged and I am making further reports on the whole matter to meeting of my colleagues this morning. In meantime a review of reports on your negotiations yesterday would indicate that a good

deal of progress was made in finding common grounds in respect to matters other than wages. Before asking cabinet to consider what attitude the government should take, as Minister of Labour, I would like to feel that every means for free and unhampered negotiations have been considered and reconsidered. Will the heads of your committees please confer by telephone or otherwise as soon as possible and I shall telephone by 2 p.m. today to learn results. I am anxious that full advantage be taken of the resources of unhampered collective bargaining.

I did telephone Mr. Gordon and Mr. Kelly at about two p.m., Mr. Speaker. They told me that a meeting had been arranged for three o'clock this afternoon. I indicated to them that I should like to get in touch with them before the house closes at six o'clock so that we might expect to have a report on any progress that might be made.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   STATEMENT ON THREATENED RAILWAY STRIKE
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QUESTIONS

NATIONAL DEFENCE

BRIGADE TRAINING AREA

PC

Mr. Brooks:

Progressive Conservative

1. What sites were inspected in connection with the proposed brigade training area for Canadian troops?

2. What are the names of the persons who made the inspections?

3. Has a report been made in each case to the Department of National Defence?

4. If so, will the report be made public?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   BRIGADE TRAINING AREA
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LIB

Mr. Blanchette: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. With the expansion of the Canadian army, since the beginning of hostilities in Korea in June, 1950, and the contribution of the Canadian forces for the defence of western Europe under the North Atlantic treaty, it has become increasingly necessary to have an area in Canada large enough to permit the training in active service operations of a brigade and even larger formations. If possible, this area should be on the Atlantic seaboard so that it could be used for mobilization, final training and embarkation of formations that might be sent overseas to take their place in the forces of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization to prevent or stop aggression. Such an area should be located in a place where the climate permits training all the year round and where the ground has the characteristics that might be found in western Europe, with roads and other physical features permitting the employment of armoured and other vehicles and artillery and other weapons. Using existing information and also the results of new examinations, sites were looked

13S6

Questions

at in various parts of Canada but particularly in the maritime provinces, including areas in the neighbourhood of Guysborough, Annapolis and Lunenburg in Nova Scotia, Tracadie, Sussex, Utopia and Gagetown in New Brunswick.

2. These inspections were made by officers of the Canadian army and officials of the Department of National Defence.

3 and 4. The reports which were made to the Department of National Defence were intended for the confidential advice and action which resulted in the selection of Camp Gagetown as having more of the desired characteristics than any other area and also as involving the displacement of less persons than any comparable area. In accordance with the established practice they will not be made public.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   BRIGADE TRAINING AREA
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS

WOOD SOLD, MONCTON, N.B.

PC

Mr. Robichaud:

Progressive Conservative

1. How many car loads of scrap wood and/or firewood were sold or offered for sale, by the Canadian National Railways, at or in the vicinity of Moncton, New Brunswick, during the years 1951 and 1952?

2. Was such wood sold by tender or otherwise?

3. At what price per car load was such wood disposed of?

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   WOOD SOLD, MONCTON, N.B.
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L L

William Moore Benidickson (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Transport)

Liberal Labour

Mr. Benidickson:

The Canadian National Railways advise as follows:

1. Year 1951-81 cars.

Year 1952-53 cars.

2. Sold by tender.

3. It is not the policy of the company to make public the amounts tendered for the purchase of company material sold as a result of calling for tenders.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   WOOD SOLD, MONCTON, N.B.
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NATIONAL DEFENCE

"CANADIAN ARMY JOURNAL"

PC

Mr. Pearkes:

Progressive Conservative

1. Does the Department of National Defence publish a booklet entitled Canadian Army Journal?

2. If so, who is the editor?

3. How many copies of each number are issued?

4. Are the copies paid for, or are they issued free?

5. If any copies are issued free, how many?

6. How many persons are employed in the preparation and issuance of this publication?

7. What is the cost, annually, of the Canadian Army Journal?

8. What were the numbers of each issue printed for the months of October 1952, November 1952, December 1952, and January 1953?

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   "CANADIAN ARMY JOURNAL"
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LIB

Mr. Blanchette: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. There is an editorial board of army officers. At present the editorial board consists of the director of military training, the

director of administration, the director of operations and planning, and the director of public relations, army.

3. Each issue consists of 19,000 copies.

4 and 5. Each issue of the Canadian Army Journal is distributed free of charge to all active and reserve force officers; C.O.T.C. contingents; cadet services of Canada (officers and instructors); to unit libraries (active and reserve force); officers, N.C.O.'s and men's messes; secretaries of the dominion of Canada rifle association and provincial rifle associations; military institutes; corps associations; to public libraries to be available for officers of the supplementary reserve; external affairs (for high commissioners, embassies, legations etc.); war office, United Kingdom; United Kingdom army schools; editors of U.S. armed forces journals; to members of parliament on request and to members of the parliamentary press gallery.

6. Three.

7. The total annual cost of publishing the Canadian Army Journal is $35,000.

8. Although normally published monthly, a consolidated issue is made when it is not possible to publish monthly. The issues for October, November and December of 1952 were consolidated into one issue of which 19,000 copies were printed. The January, 1953, issue is now being prepared and will be issued in the same quantity.

Topic:   NATIONAL DEFENCE
Subtopic:   "CANADIAN ARMY JOURNAL"
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CENTRAL MECHANIZATION DEPOT

PC

Mr. White (Middlesex East):

Progressive Conservative

1. How many tires for cars are stored at central mechanization depot, London, Ontario, and when were these purchased, by years?

2. How many tires for trucks are stored at the above-mentioned depot and what years were these purchased, by years?

3. How many tires for other vehicles are stored at central mechanization depot, London, and when were these purchased, by years?

Topic:   CENTRAL MECHANIZATION DEPOT
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January 28, 1953