December 2, 1952

LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Hon. W. E. Harris (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration):

The hon. member was kind enough to give me notice a few hours ago, but in the meantime I have not been able to get in touch with the agency concerned, so my answer will have to be based on the information available in Ottawa. We have not received any complaints from Indian veterans on the reserves mentioned. On the other hand, I did receive a personal letter about the 20th of last month from an individual who is not resident in the maritimes about conditions there. In answering him I promised an investigation and ordered it, I believe on the 22nd of November. I have not had a report but I will ask for it right away.

Topic:   INDIAN AFFAIRS
Subtopic:   CONSTRUCTION OF VETERANS' HOMES
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INQUIRY AS TO PRICE CUT


On the orders of the day:


CCF

William Scottie Bryce

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. William Bryce (Selkirk):

I had intended to direct a question to the Minister of Agriculture but perhaps his parliamentary assistant will take note of it. In view of the minister's announcement yesterday regarding the lifting of the United States embargo, will the minister give further consideration to the cut in hog prices to take effect on December 31? Perhaps this cut could be postponed to March 1 or later.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO PRICE CUT
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LIB

Robert McCubbin (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. Robert McCubbin (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Agriculture):

will take note of the hon. member's question and an answer will be given in due course.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO PRICE CUT
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REPORTED CONTRACT WITH UNITED STATES

ARRANGEMENTS FOR PURCHASE


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Defence Production. Is the minister prepared to comment on press reports from Washington which allege that Silver Miller Mines Limited of Toronto agreed to pay $835,000 to a former assistant secretary of defence at Washington to promote a contract with the United States government for the purchase of cobalt from this firm? Would the minister care to tell the house whether the Canadian government is purchasing cobalt from this firm, and if so, under what terms?

Topic:   REPORTED CONTRACT WITH UNITED STATES
Subtopic:   ARRANGEMENTS FOR PURCHASE
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Defence Production):

Arrangements for the purchase of cobalt for defence purposes were announced in the house on February 15, 1951, and a revision of the plan was announced on December 28, 1951. A public announcement was made at both times. The government agency is purchasing cobalt from any source that offers cobalt to the smelter on the terms of those two announcements. The Silver Miller situation is one that involves certain Canadian citizens and a procurement agency of the government of the United States. We have no knowledge of the circumstances and are not particularly interested.

The situation could have been avoided if the procurement agency of the United States had followed the arrangement we have suggested to it, and which has been followed generally, that any purchase contract for metal in Canada be cleared through the Department of Defence Production before the contract is closed.

Topic:   REPORTED CONTRACT WITH UNITED STATES
Subtopic:   ARRANGEMENTS FOR PURCHASE
Permalink
CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

Is the present price of $2 a pound, which appears in the press reports,

the price that was fixed in the revised arrangements made on December 28, 1951?

Topic:   REPORTED CONTRACT WITH UNITED STATES
Subtopic:   ARRANGEMENTS FOR PURCHASE
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

I am sorry to say my memory is not that good. I do not remember whether the price is $2. However, I know my hon. triend is very good on research, and if he will look up the statement I made in the house on the date mentioned he will find the arrangement set out in great detail.

Topic:   REPORTED CONTRACT WITH UNITED STATES
Subtopic:   ARRANGEMENTS FOR PURCHASE
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SPEECH FROM THE THRONE

CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY


The house resumed, from Monday, December 1, consideration of the motion of Mr. J. L. Deslieres for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, and the amendment thereto of Mr. Drew, and the amendment to the amendment of Mr. Coldwell.


LIB

George Taylor Fulford

Liberal

Mr. G. T. Fulford (Leeds):

Mr. Speaker, last night when I adjourned the debate I had been dealing with the particular phase of the speech from the throne having to do with the St. Lawrence seaway. Today it is my intention to deal with matters of an entirely different nature. First of all, I am sure that we all wish the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and the Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott) well in their discussions at the economic conference between the various commonwealth nations now being held in London. I know furthermore that we regret that the Minister of Trade and Commerce could not join the Canadian delegation that is over there at the present time, but at the same time I can think of no better person who could have been left behind to head the government during the absence of the Prime Minister.

We all feel that probably at the root of the trouble so far as commonwealth trade and world trade generally are concerned is the peculiar and unfortunate position of the pound. Certainly everyone would like to see some method devised whereby convertibility of the pound and Canadian and United States dollars could be brought about. The best way of bringing this about of course is to increase our trade with the United Kingdom and other parts of the commonwealth, but we in Canada have come to a place where I doubt very much whether our dairy farmers and our beef and hog producers would be satisfied if they were dependent on the former contracts with the United Kingdom.

Mr. Speaker, I would like to put on record some figures which I obtained from the Department of Trade and Commerce. I might

The Address-Mr. Fulford say that these figures are as of November 18, 1952. The prices of products of countries other than Canada are those at present in effect and in terms of the Canadian equivalent in cents per pound f.o.b. the country of origin for approximately the same quality.

We will take bacon. The price of bacon in Denmark and in Holland is 30-32 cents per pound. In Canada it is 36 cents per pound. For beef, New Zealand top quality, average 14 cents; medium, average 12-5 cents; and cows, average 9-8 cents per pound. Argentine prices are presently being negotiated but the asking price for all meat in the Argentine is 18-7 cents. The Canadian prices are: good, average 44 cents; commercial, average 42 cents; cows, average 36 cents. Then we go to butter. In Australia the price is 37-8 cents; New Zealand, 37-8 cents; in Denmark which is a little closer to the British market, and that makes up the price differential, 40-7 cents; and the Canadian price is 62 cents. With respect to cheese, Australia and New Zealand both have the same price, 21-2 cents per pound. In Canada the price is 32 cents per pound.

I have one more set of figures I should like to place on the record. These are supplied by the Department of Agriculture and they have to do with eggs. The figures quoted per dozen are the mid-September prices, 1952: Australia, 52-2 cents per dozen; Ireland, 54-2 cents per dozen; and Denmark 46-4 cents per dozen. Grade A large eggs were selling in Montreal at that time for 61 cents per dozen.

Now, Mr. Speaker, it does not take much argument on my part to show that we cannot blast our way into such markets. Quite a famous Conservative leader some twenty years ago-

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

An hon. Member:

What was his name?

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

George Taylor Fulford

Liberal

Mr. Fulford:

Well, we do not speak ill of the dead, and he was a great Canadian.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
?

An hon. Member:

We heard yesterday

about the dead.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

George Taylor Fulford

Liberal

Mr. Fulford:

It does not take much vision to see that it would not be to Canada's advantage at this time to try to blast our way into the agricultural markets of Great Britain with produce from the Canadian farms. One important thing that those opposite are always trying to say is that we are losing our markets and that we should have more markets in the United Kingdom. Well, we should have more markets in the United Kingdom, but it is an axiom of trade that in order to sell you have got to buy. It is a strange paradox that when we do purchase in quantity from the United Kingdom our

The Address-Mr. Fulford friends opposite are the first to raise their voices in protest, and in particular I will mention the textile trade.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON ADDRESS IN REPLY
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December 2, 1952