November 24, 1952

THE MINISTRY

APPOINTMENT OF ASSOCIATE MINISTER OF NATIONAL DEFENCE

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to lay on the table order in council P.C. 4553 passed this day, which reads as follows:

His Excellency the Governor General in Council, on the recommendation of the Minister of National Defence and under and by virtue of the powers conferred by section 5 of the National Defence Act, is pleased to designate and doth hereby designate the Solicitor General of Canada as a person who, in addition to the Minister of National Defence, may exercise any power or perform any duty or function that is vested in or that may be exercised or performed by the Minister of National Defence under the National Defence Act, provided that such exercise of power or performance of duty or function shall not depart from the manner in which the Minister of National Defence may have previously determined that such power should be exercised or such duty or function should be performed.

Hon. members will have noticed that legislation was forecast in the speech from the throne to provide for an Associate Minister of National Defence. Provision is made in existing legislation for associate ministers in time of war, but no provision now exists for an appointment in peacetime. The government might of course have made such provision under the Emergency Powers Act, but it was felt preferable to ask parliament to make the provision in regular statute form, and if that is done it is my intention, which I have already communicated to the Governor General, to submit to him a formal recommendation for the appointment to this post of the present Solicitor General. Meanwhile it was felt desirable to use the power vested in the governor in council by parliament under section 5 of the National Defence Act to empower the Solicitor General to perform the function, which would, in due course, be attributed to the Associate Minister of National Defence.

The Solicitor General was, until he became a member of the ministry, parliamentary assistant to the Minister of National Defence, and there is a real need not only for continuity but for the assumption of an increased share of responsibility for the heavy burden of that department. This is particularly desirable at this time as it is going to be

necessary during the course of this session for the Minister of National Defence to attend a meeting of the North Atlantic council in Paris, and while he is absent the Solicitor General will be Acting Minister of National Defence, and it is important that he should have adequate background in the meantime.

As hon. members know, a number of countries at the present time have, in addition to an over-all minister of defence, a minister for each of the three services. That is the situation in the United Kingdom, the United States, France and Australia. We have, however, considered it preferable in Canada to stress the unification of the services for purposes of administration under the control of a single minister, a single deputy minister and a single department. We believe that our system has demonstrable advantages and that the appointment of separate service ministers at this time would be a retrograde step.

As the defence program developed, it might have been expected that the volume of work required of the minister would have become lighter. That has not been the case. Unfortunately the prolonging of the conflict in Korea, the build-up of our forces in Europe, and our relations with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, as well as greatly increasing the responsibilities of administering the department, have also made it necessary for the minister to be absent from the country from time to time.

That is why the Minister of National Defence and I have, for some time, been considering the possibility of making some division of the work of the Minister oi National Defence. In view of the developments I have mentioned, we came to the conclusion that it is desirable here, for the time being at least, to have an associate ministei as a full member of the cabinet who woulc participate, with ministerial authority anc responsibility, in the supervision of the more immediate matters of administration whicl would leave the Minister of National Defence with more time for matters of general policy consideration of defence planning and relation: with the defence forces of other countries.

No attempt has been made in the order ii council I have read to delimit precisely thi functions of the two ministers, and it i probable that no attempt will be made to di so in the legislation to be submitted later ii

Gold Mining

the session. Obviously, a relationship of this sort can only be successful if there is the com-pletest mutual confidence and co-operation between the ministers, and there is every advantage in having the arrangement as flexible as possible.

It is intended that the present arrangement under section 5 of the National Defence Act will be continued until such time as the house has had an opportunity to consider the legislation to be introduced to provide for an Associate Minister of National Defence, under that designation.

Topic:   THE MINISTRY
Subtopic:   APPOINTMENT OF ASSOCIATE MINISTER OF NATIONAL DEFENCE
Permalink

COINAGE

ORDER IN COUNCIL GOVERNING MINTING OF FIVE-CENT PIECE

LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Douglas Abbott (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to table two copies of order in council P.C. 4525 dated November 19, 1952, revoking the amendment passed under the Emergency Powers Act authorizing the minting of the five-cent coin of steel. Perhaps I might add that that order is being passed concurrently with the orders under the new Currency Act which provide for minting new coins with the effigy of our new sovereign, Queen Elizabeth II. Proclamations to that effect are today or tomorrow being issued concurrently in London, Ottawa, and other capitals of the commonwealth.

Topic:   COINAGE
Subtopic:   ORDER IN COUNCIL GOVERNING MINTING OF FIVE-CENT PIECE
Permalink

EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT

FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953

LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Douglas Abboii (Minisier of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, since I do not expect to be in the house for some little time after today I should like to make a statement regarding the proposed amendment to the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act.

Hon. members will recall that during the last session legislation was approved extending the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act to cover the calendar years 1952 and 1953. This legislation was brought forward by the government because of the continuing special difficulties of the industry as a result of rising costs and a fixed price for the industry's product.

During 1952 the industry's costs have continued to rise. At the same time the appreciation in the exchange rate for the Canadian dollar has meant that for most of the year the mines have received a steadily decreasing return from their sales. A number of mines have been forced to close and others are being placed in a position where they might soon be compelled to take this step. During

the last month the government has received representations from both the gold producers and the municipal authorities of the principal communities affected setting forth the special difficulties which face the industry at this time. The government has now decided that, in order to prevent the further closing of mines and the consequent hardship which this would cause to communities largely or wholly dependent on them, adjustments should be made to the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act with a view to assisting the industry in meeting the special difficulties with which it is confronted.

In view of the desirability of giving advance notice of the conditions upon which gold mining assistance will be paid during 1953 in order that the industry may be able to plan its operations for the new year, I desire to announce that the government has now decided to introduce legislation amending the Emergency Gold Mining Assistance Act effective as from January 1 next. The proposed amendment will broaden the formula for the calculation of assistance payments during the calendar year 1953 by changing the method of calculating the rate of assistance element in the formula. The act in its present form defines the rate of assistance as one-half of the excess of the cost of production per ounce over $22, with a maximum of $11.50. The proposed amendment will change the definition of the rate of assistance to one-half the excess of the cost of production per ounce over $18, with a maximum of $13.50. No change will be made in the other component of the formula; the new rate of assistance will be applicable to the number of ounces of gold produced by a mine in 1953 in excess of one-half of base year production, or one-half of 1953 production, whichever is the larger.

All I need add at this moment is that this modification in our gold assistance formula has been discussed with the international monetary fund, which has raised no objection. In conclusion, may I express the belief that this proposal will be of further assistance to the industry generally in meeting its special difficulties, and will enable the continued operation of many mines in communities which are dependent upon them.

Topic:   EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT
Subtopic:   FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953
Permalink
PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Donald M. Fleming (Eglinion):

I

wonder if I might ask the Minister of Finance to clarify one or two points in connection with his statement. First, is it clear there is no provision for the industry in 1952?

Topic:   EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT
Subtopic:   FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953
Permalink
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

That is correct.

Topic:   EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT
Subtopic:   FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953
Permalink
PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fleming:

Has any progress been made toward raising the prices at which gold may be sold to the United States or other world buyers?

Topic:   EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT
Subtopic:   FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953
Permalink
LIB

Douglas Charles Abbott (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. Abbott:

As my hon. friend is aware, that is a matter which really does not depend on the policy of the government.

Topic:   EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT
Subtopic:   FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953
Permalink
PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Graydon:

Could you not make it apply this year?

Topic:   EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT
Subtopic:   FORMULA FOR CALCULATION OF ASSISTANCE PAYMENTS DURING 1953
Permalink

INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

AMENDMENT OF CHAPTER 54, STATUTES OF 1947-1948-VOLUNTARY REVOCABLE CHECK-OFF OF UNION DUES

CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 2, to amend the Industrial Relations and Disputes Investigation Act (voluntary revocable check-off).

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT OF CHAPTER 54, STATUTES OF 1947-1948-VOLUNTARY REVOCABLE CHECK-OFF OF UNION DUES
Permalink

DIVORCE JURISDICTION

EXCHEQUER COURT TO HAVE JURISDICTION IN ACTIONS ORIGINATING IN QUEBEC AND NEWFOUNDLAND

CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 3, to provide for the jurisdiction of the Exchequer Court of Canada in matters of divorce.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   DIVORCE JURISDICTION
Subtopic:   EXCHEQUER COURT TO HAVE JURISDICTION IN ACTIONS ORIGINATING IN QUEBEC AND NEWFOUNDLAND
Permalink

November 24, 1952