November 21, 1952


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

should like to direct a question to the Minister of Transport. Has he received any complaints with regard to the demotion of Robert Pitt, manager of the Canadian National's Fort Garry hotel in Winnipeg? Has he asked for any investigation? Have the causes of the demotion been investigated by him in any way?

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   HOTEL MANAGEMENT
Sub-subtopic:   DEMOTION OF ROBERT PITT
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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport):

I have received no complaints. Having made that answer, I presume it disposes of the other two questions; but if my hon. friend presses the matter I can inquire from the officers of the Canadian National Railways-and I will-to ascertain what the position is.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   HOTEL MANAGEMENT
Sub-subtopic:   DEMOTION OF ROBERT PITT
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PROVISION OF REFRIGERATOR CARS FOR PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND POTATOES


On the orders of the day:


?

Mr. W. Chester S. McLure@Queens

desire to direct a question to the Minister of Transport. Will the minister provide sufficient reefer cars for the farmers of Prince Edward Island to transport their bumper crop of potatoes to a good market with bumper prices? We are short of reefer cars.

Topic:   PROVISION OF REFRIGERATOR CARS FOR PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND POTATOES
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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport):

I think that question deserves an answer and I have come prepared to make one. Perhaps the house will bear with me while I make it. The potato crop of Prince Edward Island this year, I understand, is the best in volume for some time and the prices offered for potatoes are extremely attractive to the growers. I am very glad indeed that Prince Edward Island is in a position to benefit from these favourable circumstances.

Naturally the heavy concentrated movement of traffic from the island to the mainland creates a problem for the transportation facilities available. Canadian National Railways is faced with a very heavy requirement

[Mr. Hees.l

of refrigerator cars to handle this potato crop and, naturally, it is practically impossible for the railway management to meet all the requirements at the same time.

In co-operation with the management of Canadian National Railways it has been possible thus far to divert at least 50 refrigerator cars from Montreal to the maritime provinces every day to take care of this movement. The latest figures which I have before me indicate that, since September 1 of this year, nearly 1,500 cars of potatoes have been shipped from Prince Edward Island qs against 386 in 1951. This by itself is quite an accomplishment and I feel confident that the Canadian National Railways will be able to take care of all the requirements of the potato growers during the next few months.

It must be realized, of course, that refrigerator cars are at a premium during the winter months, and as most shipments of potatoes from Prince Edward Island are destined to United States points, the problem is aggravated by the fact that many of the cars do not return to Canada as quickly as we would like them to.

I might add that the management of the Canadian National Railways has begun to receive delivery of some 15 cars per day of an order of 500 refrigerator cars.

Topic:   PROVISION OF REFRIGERATOR CARS FOR PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND POTATOES
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REVISED STATUTES

INQUIRY AS TO AVAILABILITY OF NEW EDITION


On the orders of the day:


PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Donald M. Fleming (Eglinton):

I should like to ask the Minister of Justice if he is in a position to tell the house when the new Revised Statutes of Canada will be available.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO AVAILABILITY OF NEW EDITION
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LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Stuari S. Garson (Minister of Justice):

I have nothing to add to the statement I made before the adjournment of the last session of parliament in which I stated I expected they would be available some time in the month of January or February of 1953.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO AVAILABILITY OF NEW EDITION
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SPEECH FROM THE THRONE

ADDRESS IN REPLY, MOVED BY MR. J. L. DESLIERES AND SECONDED BY MR. N. C. SCHNEIDER


The house proceeded to the consideration of the speech delivered by His Excellency the Governor General at the opening of the session. (Translation):


LIB

Joseph-Léon Deslières

Liberal

Mr. J. L. Deslieres (Brome-Missisquoi):

Mr. Speaker, it is not without some apprehension that I rise to speak in this house where so

many of our great political leaders have spoken since confederation; yet, the generous sympathy shown by my colleagues gives me confidence.

May I first be permitted to thank the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) for the signal honour he bestows today upon me by asking me to move the address in reply to the speech from the throne, delivered by His Excellency the Governor General at the opening of the seventh session of the twenty-first parliament.

I think I can also express the gratefulness and thankfulness of all Canadians for his continuous and untiring efforts to ensure the good administration of the country.

He has not spared himself and, in the past few months, has continued to show his interest in the progress of our industrial districts. Last August, for instance, he travelled through the Saguenay-Lake St. John district and last September he visited British Columbia.

It is not surprising that, thanks to these numerous contacts with our Canadian way of life, in all its various aspects, the leader of our government should show himself to be so perfectly aware of all our problems, whenever these are brought to his attention.

Through its activity and its competence, our government has succeeded in maintaining in this country economic circumstances so favourable as to have evoked the greatest praise from the other countries of the free world. Not only do these countries think highly of Canada and of its administration, but they send their representatives to this country so that through a study of our methods they may find a solution to their own problems.

The member for Brome-Missisquoi, who has been honoured with the task of moving this address, knows that this honour is more properly borne by the people of his constituency. That is why I feel today a legitimate pride in addressing you on behalf of my constituents.

My constituency is, in a way, a reduced-scale model of Canada, in that it includes all the ethnical and economic elements which, from sea to sea, go to make up our beautiful country.

In the first place, one may find there, as everywhere else in Canada, the descendants of the two great races which have, side by side-and at times in spite of differences of views and opinion-helped build, in this land of America, a nation and civilization which it would be impossible today to confuse with

The Address-Mr. Deslieres any other, either in Europe or America. We owe this distinction to the mutual and constant co-operation which these two races have shown in order to create a very distinct entity called the Canadian nation.

From an economic viewpoint, one may also find in Brome-Missisquoi, on a reduced scale, all the elements of our economic life, from the different types of agriculture to the development of our natural resources and the manufacturing of finished products.

We do not claim to be able to reach the production records set in some other parts of the country, in one or the other of the different branches of economic activities. However, by virtue of that synthesis, from an economic as well as an ethnical point of view, I get the impression, when setting forth the feelings and the aspirations of the citizens of my riding, that I am speaking for all Canadians regardless of their tongue, their belief or their economic status.

(Text):

It is with great pride, Mr. Speaker, that the people of Brome-Missisquoi share with the rest of Canada the enviable position of having side by side the two great races which have been so instrumental in the tremendous progress experienced by our country since confederation.

This fact in itself is a clear indication of the good will and mutual trust existing in that part of the country which is commonly called the eastern townships. That community has always been a living example of the mutual understanding which must exist between the two great races-an example of the effort to which Canada owes its present high standing in every field of human endeavour and achievement.

Before going further with my remarks, may I extend my respects to you, Mr. Speaker, and assure you of my complete co-operation with you in the high office which you have always filled with dignity and impartiality.

(Translation):

May I now recall two losses which have affected the parliamentary world.

First, I would like to recall the memory of my predecessor whom we mourn: Henri Gos-selin. His premature death is for us a deep sorrow.

Mr. Gosselin gave all his time to the welfare of his district, of his province and of his country; he remained for us a model of devotion to public service, ready to sacrifice his time and even his very health.

The House of Commons mourns also the loss of one of its oldest as well as one of its most

The Address-Mr. Deslieres congenial members, Joseph Henry Harris, who passed away last month. He represented the Danforth constituency in the house since 1921; all those who have had occasion, in the course of his active career, to come in contact with him have keenly felt his death, no matter what their political affiliation may be.

Since the last session, Mr. Speaker, many events have taken place on the Canadian political stage; I shall mention only the most significant ones in the national and international field.

We have been informed to our great pleasure of the appointment of the Hon. R. W. Mayhew to the post of first Canadian ambassador to Japan. The Hon. Mr. Mayhew had been Minister of Fisheries since June 11, 1948; he took part in

the peace conference with Japan and twice returned to that country as the official representative of Canada. He also contributed to the drawing up of the Colombo plan. Because of his great knowledge of Asia and Asiatic affairs, as well as of the active part he generally took in the nation's business, he is particularly qualified to occupy this important post.

It gives me pleasure to congratulate the member for Coast-Capilano (Mr. Sinclair), who was recently appointed a member of Her Majesty's privy council and Minister of Fisheries. Since 1940, the new Minister of Fisheries has contributed in more ways than one to the good administration of this country, both through his contribution to the debates of the house and in his capacity as parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Finance.

I also would like to extend my congratulations to the member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Campney) who has been made a member of Her Majesty's privy council and appointed Solicitor General of Canada.

Though he is rather a newcomer on the political scene, he brings to his new duties a long experience of public life gained both through the exercise of his profession and as secretary to the Right Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King and the Hon. James Malcolm. He also distinguished himself as chairman of the national harbours board and as parliamentary assistant to the Minister of National Defence.

I refer with great pleasure to the presence in the house of the newly-elected members for Outremont-St. Jean (Mr. Bourque), and Richelieu-Vercheres (Mr. Cardin). Both have gained an enviable reputation and will I am sure be a credit to their constituents.

Together with the other nations of the free world, all Canadians must be proud of our

soldiers who are fighting so valiantly in Korea, for they stand guard and fight on the United Nations' first line of defence, not only for the immediate protection of the South Koreans, but also for the preservation of our own freedom which is under the constant threat of communist aggression.

People generally do not realize to what extent Canada's armed forces have been increased in my province.

In recent years, the Valcartier camp has become a vast and permanent area for military training.

There are already in Quebec a number of major defence establishments such as the vast stores depot at Longue Pointe, the naval supply depot at Ville La Salle, the fighter bases at Bagotville and St. Hubert, not to mention the great many radar stations, etc.

The admission centre for airmen and airwomen from all parts of Canada has been established in St. Johns.

In Quebec city, our navy has established the Montcalm school where recruits of French descent study together under French-speaking officers and instructors. The number of applicants has exceeded the school's capacity.

We have also witnessed the steady improvement of the Quebec citadel. Repairs were made with imagination and logic, so as to bring out the original characteristics of these ancient structures.

On this splendid historic site we find not only the governor general's residence, but also a whole series of military structures, so that the citadel is second to none among comparable establishments; it is the ideal headquarters, the ideal home of one of the most glorious regiments, the Royal 22nd.

Finally, last week, His Excellency the Governor General officially opened a new college, the St. Johns Royal Military College. Young Canadians from all over Canada are following its courses. A good majority of the students are French-speaking. This is the first really bilingual establishment of the kind on this side of the ocean. One may see in this gesture the acknowledgment of the importance of the French-speaking element in our confederation. This is a step forward in the field of military training in Canada. It is the recognition of the essential unity of our country.

For that initiative and the spirit which inspired their achievement, we must-and the whole province is of that opinion-congratu-

late very warmly the government and the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Claxton).

The people of Quebec have followed with legitimate pride the feats of arms of the Royal 22nd Regiment in Korea. These achievements and others that I could mention have given us very great satisfaction.

In the international sphere, I must draw attention to the various international conferences held in Canada, the Commonwealth Forestry Association's conference, that of the International Red Cross, held in Toronto and, finally, the conference held by the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association, in which we are specially interested.

It is interesting to note that nearly one hundred delegates, representing forty-eight sections of the association, accepted the invitation of the Canadian section to attend that parliamentary conference. It is also interesting to note that representatives of the United States of America and of the republic of Ireland took part in some of the debates, during that conference.

During their stay in Canada, the delegates of the commonwealth nations had the privilege of visiting Canada from coast to coast and of familiarizing themselves with our Canadian institutions.

Allow me, Mr. Speaker, to congratulate you in your capacity as joint chairman of the Canadian section, along with all those who co-operated with you in making this meeting and this journey such outstanding successes.

There is yet another example of the high regard in which the nations of the world hold Canada and its representatives, and that is the election of Mr. Pearson as president of the general assembly of the United Nations Organization.

It might be well to recall that the Right Hon. the Prime Minister and the Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott) will attend at the end of this month, in London, a meeting of commonwealth prime ministers which has been called to discuss ways and means of solving the monetary troubles of Great Britain.

From a national point of view, Mr. Speaker, it is only fair to mention the numerous advantages which accrue every day to every Canadian through the health assistance' plan put into effect by the Department of National Health and Welfare.

Recognizing the value of our human resources, the Canadian government has promoted the extension of health and hospital facilities, the multiplication of the number of 68108-2

The Address-Mr. Deslieres hospital beds, by providing the provinces with considerable sums for this very purpose, these grants running into several million dollars.

It has given this help, not by substituting itself for the provinces, but on the contrary, with their co-operation, by acting jointly with them in the implementation of this great undertaking.

In announcing some of the bills to be brought down, the governor general has proved beyond doubt the great concern shown by the government for the preservation of the high standard of living enjoyed by our people, as well as for the consideration which should be given to all classes of our people. Incidentally, the government's intention of improving the rural mail carrier's lot should receive the unanimous support of all members of this house.

In pursuance of the Massey commission's report, and following the assistance given to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and the universities approved by the provinces, the act respecting the establishment of a national library will receive without any doubt the support of all Canadians, who see in the implementation of such a project a measure which meets the intellectual and cultural needs of our nation.

In this connection, may I mention the justified tribute which was rendered, last September, by the academic world of Canada to Quebec's Laval university, on the occasion of its centenary, thus recognizing this university's contribution to the intellectual development of our country.

The bill concerning the St. Lawrence seaway bears witness to the industrial and economic expansion of our country. This vast project, which will make the very centre of the North American continent accessible from every ocean, will tighten the geographic links which exist with the other free countries, whose peoples are already morally won over to the Canadian ideal.

Because of all this, Mr. Speaker, I have the honour to move, seconded by the hon. member for Waterloo North (Mr. Schneider):

That the following address be presented to His Excellency the Governor General of Canada:

To His Excellency the Right Honourable Vincent Massey, C.H., Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of Canada:

May it please Your Excellency:

We, Her Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the House of Commons of Canada, in parliament assembled, beg leave to offer our humble thanks to Your Excellency for the gracious speech which Your Excellency has addressed to both houses of parliament.

The Address-Mr. Schneider

(Text):

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY, MOVED BY MR. J. L. DESLIERES AND SECONDED BY MR. N. C. SCHNEIDER
Permalink
LIB

Norman C. Schneider

Liberal

Mr. N. C. Schneider (Waterloo North):

The Address-Mr. Schneider most Canadians have now recognized the regrettable fact that the only safeguard we have against a possible third world war is military preparedness.

While I am on the subject I would like to say a few words to our rocking chair critics of defence spending. I spent some time in military service. It was under the Conservative government in the first great war. In contrast with my business training I was shocked at the wastage of food and the poor management of what I would call the business of the army. I am not criticizing the Conservative government particularly for the wastage I saw. Soldiers are trained to destroy the enemy. That is their main interest and purpose. Parliament agrees that a strong military force is our only salvation.

Recently a few newspapers have been using figures on the purchase of stores and clothing for our armed forces in a way which misrepresents the facts. They try to suggest excessive purchases of clothing, by the device of dividing quantities purchased by the number of personnel in the active forces.

To start with, as those who use these figures know or should know, clothing is also provided for the reserve forces and cadets whose numbers are more than equal to those of the active force. Moreover, they know or should know that certain items are being stockpiled against a possible emergency. They know or should know that in calculating requirements of clothing or barrack stores there are additional factors to be taken into account such as sizing, distribution, lead time, and so forth. All these facts and factors were put before the defence expenditure committee, yet the campaign of misrepresentation goes on. They also fail to recognize the scale on which purchases must be made to provide for a defence program as large as ours, coupled sometimes with a reluctance to see our servicemen provided with the kind of amenities available to the average Canadian.

As a businessman I feel that defence expenditures should be no higher than is necessary for any emergency which might arise and I have full confidence in the army and the Department of National Defence. We have not forgotten the serious shortages of practically everything when we entered the second world war.

I feel that the following sentence in the opening remarks of the speech from the throne should be emphasized and brought home to every Canadian:

The sacrifices of those directly involved in the United Nations police action in Korea and the anxieties of their families are an inevitable and most regrettable part of the price we are paying to prevent another world war.

The termination of deferred depreciation on December 31 of this year will be a welcome step toward the relief of hard-pressed business in these times of excessive high operating costs. In operation since April 11, 1951, it has been an anti-inflationary measure and has effected its purpose. As a businessman I hope that this is the first of many such concessions toward an easier burden on business and taxpayers generally.

The insertion of a clause to prohibit discrimination against any person in regard to employment on any federal contract will be welcomed by all true Canadians. Discrimination regarding race, national origin, colour or religion must never be tolerated in Canada. This can happen in Canada, as was proved in my riding in the first world war where many new Canadians were denied their vote even though they had lived most of their lives here and had sons in the Canadian army in the trenches in France.

Regarding consideration of the extension of the program of co-operation with the provincial governments in health and hospital facilities, evidently the intention is to carry on and complete the program outlined by our former prime minister, Right Hon. William Lyon Mackenzie King, in his speech on May 14, 1948. What further facilities are to be considered I do not know, but let us keep in mind that the Liberal government has already invested over $150 million of federal funds in hospitals and health measures in the provincial field, and Liberal governments have a good record for finishing anything they start.

One matter regarding health services I feel I must speak on is the means test at present imposed on the $40 per month pension paid to our blind under the present act. The blind are less able to supplement their pensions than persons over 70 years of age, who are not subject to the means test. The act at present stipulates that the pensioner's total income must not exceed $840 per year for a single person or $1,320 for a married person. These figures are considerably less than our Income Tax Act expects normal people to live on, namely $2,000 per year for a married couple and $1,000 for a single person. Application of the means test to blind persons as at present merely discourages them from helping themselves. They cannot participate in normal recreation or labour. Many who have found congenial occupation would rather work full time than be bored doing nothing. After studying this matter fully I hope the house will agree that the means test as applied to the blind is outdated and unfair.

The proposal to extend television by establishing additional broadcasting stations at

Halifax, Winnipeg and Vancouver is according to plan, and we are glad to note that applications for private licences may be considered when recommended by the C.B.C. to serve areas which cannot be served by public stations. Observing the mistakes which have been made in other countries, Canadians are anxious that this service be held under full control. It is my conviction that with 90 per cent of the people of Canada using radio receiving sets, it is now reasonable that we should discontinue the $2.50 licence fee per home and put the costs in the general tax.

It has not been my privilege to be in the house for any length of time-only a matter of a few weeks-and I hope that what I have said, or what I am about to say, will not be misconstrued, coming as it does from one who is not yet familiar with procedure in the house. As a businessman accustomed to quick decision and action 1 have been disappointed in the amount of time spent on debate on matters that could surely be settled much quicker without risk of making a mistake. The right to express our opinions is the assured privilege of everyone in the house, but I feel that we should also consider the serious

The Address-Mr. Schneider loss of time to all members when we are forced to listen to endless repetition and quotations.

We are a growing country and parliament will have to grow with it in such a manner that we can dispose of the increased business smoothly and efficiently. This is a shortcoming of parliament; but I think in fairness to the Canadian people I ought to conclude by referring to the steadily growing pride among our people in the clean, honest government we have enjoyed in Canada. Much has been said about this but I think the Ottawa Journal of August 27, 1952, put it in a few words when they said on this point:

To the eternal credit of our public men no man in this country today dares to rise and say, or can say with truth, that a single cent of the billions spent was diverted to a private pocket from its proper channel.

For our democracy, whatever its shortcomings, that is a glory.

Mr. Speaker, 1 have great pleasure in seconding the motion by the hon. member for Brome-Missisquoi (Mr. Deslieres).

On motion of Mr. Drew the debate was adjourned.

On motion of Mr. St. Laurent the house adjourned at 3.40 p.m.

Monday, November 24, 1952

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY, MOVED BY MR. J. L. DESLIERES AND SECONDED BY MR. N. C. SCHNEIDER
Permalink

November 21, 1952