November 20, 1952

PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received the following communication:

Ottawa, November 20, 1952

Sir:

I have the honour to inform you that the Right Honourable Thibaudeau Rinfret, Chief Justice of Canada, acting as Deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, will proceed to the Senate chamber at 11.30 a.m. on Thursday, the 20th November, for the purpose of proroguing the sixth session of the twenty-first parliament.

I have the honour to be,

6ir.

Your obedient servant,

J. F. Delaute,

Secretary to the Governor General (Administrative)

Topic:   PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT
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VACANCIES

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that during the adjournment I have received communications from several members notifying me that the following vacancies have occurred in the representation, viz.:

Of Hon. R. W. Mayhew, member for the electoral district of Victoria (B.C.), consequent upon his acceptance of an office of emolument under the crown.

Of Gerard Cournoyer, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Richelieu-Vercheres, by resignation.

Accordingly I issued my warrants to the chief electoral officer to make out new writs of election for the said electoral districts.

Topic:   VACANCIES
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NEW MEMBERS

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I have the honour to inform the house that during the adjournment the Clerk of the House has received from the chief electoral officer certificates of the election and return of the following members, viz.:

Of Romuald Bourque, Esquire, for the electoral district of Outremont-St. Jean.

Of Lucien Cardin, Esquire, for the electoral district of Richelieu-Vercheres.

Topic:   NEW MEMBERS
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THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, since the last meeting of this house one of its most esteemed members has passed away. I refer of course to the former member for Toronto Danforth.

It was with deep regret, shared by all of us regardless of party affiliations, that we learned of the death on October 25 of Mr. Joseph H. Harris, familiarly known to his many friends on parliament hill, in Toronto and, indeed, in many other parts of Canada, as Joe Harris. He had been unable, owing to ill health, to attend the last session of parliament, but most of us had hoped with some justification, in view of the reports we received from time to time from members of his family that he was recovering, that he would be able to be with us during the forthcoming session. We will miss him as will his political associates in particular and those he represented so long and so well in parliament.

Born of one of the original families of the Danforth district in 1888, he received his education at Pickering College and the University of Toronto from which he graduated in 1911 with the degree of bachelor of applied science. Ten years later, at the early age of 33, he was elected to parliament in the general election of 1921. Ever since, for thirty-one years, he has successively represented the Toronto east end ridings of East York, Scarborough and Danforth in this house.

In point of continuous service he was a veteran of parliament, being junior only to the Hon. C. G. Power who was first elected in 1917. To have remained so long in the House of Commons necessarily reflects the kind of service Mr. Harris always sought to give and succeeded in giving to all his constituents and to the country.

He of course naturally pressed for federal projects that would bring benefit to those he represented, but his work as a member of the war expenditures committee, for example, during the last war, and his active interest in the welfare of our veterans, are but examples of his concern for Canada as a whole. To the debates of the house and its committees he brought the vigorous mind and expression of a successful businessman and an active supporter of good causes.

The late J. H. Harris

As president of W. Harris and Company Limited and vice-president of the Harris Coal Company Limited, he exercised leadership in the industrial and commercial development of east Toronto. He was also president of Dominion Glues Limited of Kitchener and of Canadian Organic Developments Limited of London, England.

Whether in this house or as a prominent industrialist, Mr. Harris was ever active in promoting the welfare of that part of Canada where he was born and spent his life. One of his most constructive achievements has its monument in the Toronto East General hospital which he helped to build and where he passed away. For the last twenty years he was chairman of the board of managers of that hospital, and we all know that he worked unstintingly for its progress. Only three years ago he played the foremost part in raising funds for a new addition which, I think quite fittingly, bears his name.

His country, his city, his constituents, his party and all of us here have suffered a real loss in the death of Joe Harris. His whole life was dedicated to the service of his fellows regardless of religion or politics. This likeable, sincere and kindly man will long be missed but he has left a legacy of good works which will keep his memory alive for many years to come. I am sure that I can speak for all in saying to Mrs. Harris and other members of the family that the sincere sympathy of all members of this house goes out to them in full measure.

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of ihe Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, it is with a very deep feeling of personal loss that I join with the Prime Minister in expressing our regret at the death of a very dear friend of every member of this house and the hope that the members of his family will gain some measure of comfort from the knowledge that he lives in the thoughts of those who worked with him day by day in this sphere of activity for so many years.

As has already been said so well, Joe Harris, as we all knew him, was a lovable, earnest and kindly soul who served his constituency continuously over a long span of years during which time he sat in this house because of the personal attention and service that he gave to all people in that constituency regardless of their political affiliations. He was one to whom responsibility as an elected member immediately embraced all those who were citizens of the community he served,

Joe Harris displayed great courage in the past few years. To an extent that is well known to many members, he suffered very greatly, and it was only by immense effort

that he was able to attend the sessions as regularly and as faithfully as he did. There was hope that he might be cured of the disease which had afflicted him for some time but that hope proved to be unfulfilled, and as has been pointed out he died recently in the hospital which is so much indebted to him for the efforts that he put forth.

As everyone who has known Joe Harris for some years will attest, he was a man of very deep convictions and great faith in his own country. That was natural in a man who, by his own hard work, thrift and industry, had built for himself an important and successful place in the industrial community of Canada. He had made a great contribution to the development of the industry with which he was associated and in making that contribution had achieved very great personal success. At no time did that success in any way diminish his deep personal interest in the daily lives of every one of the people in the constituency which he had served since he was a young man.

He had deep loyalty. To him Canada was at all times his first interest and the first concern in his thoughts in the things that he did here. It was of the people of Canada that he was thinking when he presented his views on so many occasions. At the same time he was a man to whom the relationship of the Dominion of Canada, the crown and the commonwealth was a strongly living and abiding reality. He cherished those ancient loyalties which were the foundation of his great hopes of the future.

He had seen within his life tremendous developments take place in this country, and no one spoke with greater confidence of the years ahead and of the opportunities for youth in . Canada in the coming years, than did Joe Harris. He served his constituency well; he served his province well; and he served the Dominion of Canada well at all times in his public service.

The Toronto East General hospital stands as a permanent memorial and in a good many ways also stands as an example of the part that men and women can play in building this society of ours in Canada. There is no greater thing any man can do than ease the suffering and restore the health of those with whom he is closely associated. Throughout long years as chairman of the board of management of the Toronto East General hospital Joe Harris played a great role in extending the most effective possible service to those with whom he lived day by day. That hospital will be a memorial to Joe Harris' memory as long as it stands.

I should think that in the light of those services which he has performed no more fitting epitaph could be placed over the name of Joe Harris than the simple words: "Well done, thou good and faithful servant."

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Stanley Knowles (Winnipeg North Centre):

Mr. Speaker, we of this group wish to associate ourselves with the thoughts expressed by the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew).

Joe Harris was an esteemed member of this house and we too deeply regret his passing. We join in the tribute that has been paid to his memory and to the service that he has rendered to his community and to the nation. Likewise we wish to join with all members of this house in expressing our deepest sympathy in this their time of bereavement to his widow, to the children and to all to whom he was near and dear.

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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SC

Solon Earl Low

Social Credit

Mr. Solon E. Low (Peace River):

Mr. Speaker, the tributes that have been paid to the late member for Danforth this morning in my judgment have been richly deserved.

I feel that I am speaking for all of the members of my group when I say we held Joe Harris in very high regard. We did so because we recognized him as a high-minded, sincere, honourable gentleman, a good member who served his constituency and Canada as a whole very well. He was a vigorous personality, and this house will miss him and the contributions he has so often made and could have continued to make for a good many years had not this illness intervened. I wish to join all members of this house in mourning the loss of a good member, an honourable gentleman, and to express our sympathies to those who have been left to mourn his passing.

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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PC

James MacKerras Macdonnell

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. M. Macdonnell (Greenwood):

Mr. Speaker, coming from a riding that adjoins that of Mr. Harris I should like to add just a word.

Reference has been fittingly made to his great public service here, to his service to charitable institutions in Toronto and elsewhere, and there is just one thing I should like to add. As somewhat of a stranger to what we call in Toronto the area east of the Don, I found very quickly that the name of Joe Harris was a household word. The Harris family had been known there for many years, but Joe, by his readiness to serve everybody, carried the name to fresh heights. It was almost pathetic to see the confidence that anyone in that area who had any trouble

The late J. H. Harris

of any kind felt, that it could be solved if only he could get to Joe Harris and have him take it in hand.

With others who have spoken previously I hope the recollection of what he was, added to the sympathy which we all wish to express, will avail much to his sorrowing family.

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

Mr. Speaker, in the years I have been in the House of Commons there have been many occasions when I should have liked to say a word regarding a departed member as we have performed this solemn function year by year. This is one occasion, however, when I feel the house will agree that it is proper for me to say a word.

My mind goes back fifty years when in the one-room Plains Road school in east Toronto, in which there were twenty-seven pupils in all grades, my late father being the teacher, I met Joe Harris. Of that group in that school four subsequently became members of the House of Commons: the hon. member for York East (Mr. McGregor), the hon. member for Prince Edward-Lennox (Mr. Tustin), Joe Harris and myself.

Fifty years is a long while in one's life. Joe Harris in the House of Commons was the same Joe that I and the other serving members of that group knew so many years ago. Of him it could be said: He was a friend of the people.

The leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) spoke of the memorial words that might be most fittingly applied to him. I think of an occasion during the early days of the war when the picnic in East York was taking place and there was a procession to the site of that picnic. Three little coloured boys stood up on the street corner on Danforth, and together they used these words: "Three cheers for Joe, the man we know and love." That was the tribute of the people of his constituency throughout the years.

Mr. Speaker, I join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent), the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew) and the representatives of the other parties in extending to his widow and other members of the family my deepest sympathy. Joe Harris was a man whom members of this house without regard to party admired and esteemed, and of whom it can be said that the Toronto East General hospital to which the Prime Minister referred is his monument. Those who may come after will be able to say, as was said of Sir Christopher Wren, "If you would see his monument, look about you."

Changes in the Ministry

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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PC

Donald Methuen Fleming

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Donald M. Fleming (Eglinion):

May I

add this brief word, Mr. Speaker. In the death of our late colleague, Mr. Joseph Harris, the weight of toil in the public service has taken its toll. We have this morning heard fitting tribute expressed to his public service, to his industry and success in business, and to his concern for the welfare of his fellow citizens. Half of his life was spent in the public service of Canada in this House of Commons, a rare record. As one who valued him as a personal friend and loyal comrade, I would say that as long as unstinting public service is appreciated and recognized by Canadians the name of Joseph Harris will be cherished in grateful memory.

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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PC

George James Tustin

Progressive Conservative

Mr. G. J. Tustin (Prince Edward-Lennox):

I should like to take a minute to add a few words, since I knew Joe Harris longer than anyone in this house. I can remember that the first day I attended public school, Joe Harris called for me and we went to school together. We were in the same class throughout the whole of public school, and left public school on the same day. Since that time we have always been friends. For many years we were neighbours. Mr. Harris was born on the south side of the concession road and I was born on the north side, almost directly opposite.

I think every member of this house will agree with what has been said this morning about Joseph Harris. He was a brilliant scholar in his younger days. He continued his education, attaining a master of science degree, and used his scientific knowledge to improve the products of the firm with which he was connected. I believe everyone will agree he was a successful manufacturer and industrialist. As a tribute to his judgment I think it can be said that not once in his long business career did a strike ever take place in his plant, and he had a considerable number of employees.

In conclusion, Mr. Speaker, I should like to join with those who preceded me in extending our sincere sympathy to Mrs. Harris and the members of the family.

Topic:   THE LATE JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS
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THE MINISTRY

ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGES-MINISTER OF FISHERIES AND SOLICITOR GENERAL

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I should like to mention at this time the changes that have taken place in the ministry since the adjournment of the house last July. Hon. R. W. Mayhew was appointed ambassador and minister plenipotentiary of Canada in Japan. Hon. James Sinclair was appointed Minister of Fisheries on October 15. On the same day Hon. Ralph O. Campney was appointed Solicitor General.

I should like to table the relative orders in council dealing with those appointments, and to add that Mr. Sinclair and Mr. Campney, before taking the oaths of office as ministers of the crown, resigned as parliamentary assistants to the Minister of Finance (Mr. Abbott) and the Minister of National Defence (Mr. Claxton) respectively.

Topic:   THE MINISTRY
Subtopic:   ANNOUNCEMENT OF CHANGES-MINISTER OF FISHERIES AND SOLICITOR GENERAL
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ORDERS FOR RETURNS

INQUIRY AS TO TABLING

November 20, 1952