March 24, 1952

REFORESTATION

AGREEMENT BETWEEN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Joseph Kickham

Liberal

Mr. T. J. Kickham (Kings):

I should like to direct the following question to the Minister of Resources and Development. Has an agreement been entered into with the province of Prince Edward Island with regard to a reforestation plan, and, if so, can the minister give the house the financial terms of the agreement?

Topic:   REFORESTATION
Subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
Permalink
LIB

Robert Henry Winters (Minister of Resources and Development)

Liberal

Hon. Robert H. Winters (Minister of Resources and Development):

Yes, Mr. Speaker; the federal government and the government of Prince Edward Island have signed an agreement for the fiscal years 1951-52 to 1955-56 inclusive, for reforestation of waste lands.

Under the terms of this agreement Canada will pay to the province in each of the fiscal years 1951-52 and 1952-53 sums not to exceed $7,500 per annum. The maximum payments that may be made by Canada to the province

for the same purpose in the fiscal years subsequent to 1952-53 shall be subject to later negotiation.

Topic:   REFORESTATION
Subtopic:   AGREEMENT BETWEEN FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AND PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND
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LIVESTOCK

FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. P. E. Wright (Melfort):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to direct a question to the Minister of Agriculture. Is it the intention of the government to have the agriculture committee called before Easter to discuss the matters which the government have indicated they intend to have referred to it at this session?

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture):

Mr. Speaker, I do not think it would be possible to take our men away from the task which they are now carrying through to completion at Regina, and elsewhere, in order to have them here to give evidence prior to the Easter vacation. I would hope that they might be in a position to be here as soon as possible after the Easter vacation, and they will be, provided there are no further outbreaks-we hope that there will not be any.

In order to relieve the minds of some of those who are most interested in the matter, I might read a short report on our activities up to date, which might be helpful.

I should like to give the house a brief statement of the position with respect to our efforts to eradicate foot-and-mouth disease.

By March 14 all animals suffering from the disease or in contact with the disease had been destroyed and buried safely. The animals destroyed consisted of: 1,073 cattle; 97 sheep; 129 hogs; 2 horses (test animals); 1 goat; 1,667 poultry and 13,272 eggs. The poultry and eggs were destroyed because they were on infected premises, and it was regarded as unsafe to allow them to be moved elsewhere.

Packing plants have been cleansed and disinfected, and slaughtering operations on a restricted scale can be resumed in the near future. Cleaning and disinfection of other infected premises are proceeding but cannot be satisfactorily completed until warmer weather sets in. Meantime all such premises must be kept under quarantine.

Although many reports of disease, both within and outside of the quarantine area, have been investigated, no cases of foot-and-mouth have been found at any time or place outside of the quarantine area. Farm to

Inquiries of the Ministry

farm inspections and reinspections are con- Mr. Argue: I should like to ask the Minister tinuing in both the quarantine area and the of Agriculture a supplementary question. Is buffer zone. All results so far have been the minister or his department considering negative. Many of the investigations have establishing regulations to allocate the avail-been conducted in eastern provinces, in able market for cattle amongst the farmers most cases on farms which received western who have them to sell, so that each one will feeder cattle last fall. have a fair chance of marketing some cattle?

Special inspections have been arranged for a number of slaughter houses in the quarantine area in order that slaughter may be resumed and meat distributed to urban communities. This slaughter, together with partial operation of regularly inspected abattoirs, is now providing the main supply of meat in the quarantine area at prices which appear to be satisfactory to both producers and consumers. These prices are closely in line with, or slightly higher than, those prevailing in Winnipeg markets.

Provincial embargoes and restrictions are still hampering the free flow of livestock and meats through normal marketing channels. However, there has been considerable relaxation of these restrictions in recent days. Last week end saw the movement of some 60 carloads of livestock and more than 15 carloads of meat from Alberta to British Columbia. Hogs are again moving from Saskatchewan points outside the quarantine and buffer zone to their normal market in Winnipeg. It is hoped that further developments along these lines will take place in the near future.

The outward movement of livestock from public stockyards in Saskatchewan and Manitoba is still being prohibited under orders of the veterinary director general. This is being done because there may be still a chance of a diseased animal getting into those yards. If that should happen it would be desirable to confine the disease to the yard rather than risk having contacts shipped back to the country. If no further cases occur, it is hoped that all restrictions on the stockyards, excepting those in Regina, can be lifted soon after the snow disappears from the area in southern Saskatchewan from which disease might still be carried.

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
Permalink
CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Wright:

May I ask a supplementary question? When the committee is called, will the government have placed on the agenda of the agriculture committee the subjects which the farmers union of western Canada have indicated they want discussed?

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. Gardiner:

The house will decide what they will submit to the committee when the committee is called. At this time I cannot indicate anything which will be submitted in addition to this one matter.

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. Gardiner:

I presume that what the

hon. member has in mind is the general marketing of livestock right across the country-or is it just within this quarantined area?

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
Permalink
CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Argue:

I might explain the basis of my question, Mr. Speaker. I saw a report that the government was considering regulations which would allocate the available market within Saskatchewan to livestock producers; in other words they were considering placing a quota on the marketing of livestock in order to distribute the market among the producers.

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
Permalink
LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. Gardiner:

The only control of that kind which is in effect has to do with the quarantine area and the buffer area; and any arrangements which it has been necessary to make have been agreed to internally. There is no difficulty there at all. The stock that is coming on the market is being marketed, and the price level to consumers is satisfactory. Up to the moment we have had less difficulty there than anywhere else in Canada.

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE REPORT ON ERADICATION EFFORTS REFERENCE TO AGRICULTURE COMMITTEE
Permalink

EXPLOSIVES

FINDING OF LIVE BOMB BY BOYS AT PETAWAWA


On the orders of the day:


PC

Gordon Knapman Fraser

Progressive Conservative

Mr. G. K. Fraser (Peterborough West):

should like to address a question to the Minister of National Defence. A 20-pound live incendiary bomb was found by boys outside the Petawawa camp. Was that bomb from military stores, or can the minister say if any investigation has been made?

Topic:   EXPLOSIVES
Subtopic:   FINDING OF LIVE BOMB BY BOYS AT PETAWAWA
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LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. Brooke Claxion (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, my attention was

drawn to this matter this morning, and of course, it is being investigated. The investigations made thus far, and reported to me by telephone, indicate that this was not a 20-pound bomb, but a 2-inch mortar bomb; that it was not found outside the camp, but inside the camp; that it was not found at the side of a road, as reported in the newspaper, but on a mortar range where bombs have been used by the armed forces.

Topic:   EXPLOSIVES
Subtopic:   FINDING OF LIVE BOMB BY BOYS AT PETAWAWA
Permalink

March 24, 1952