March 7, 1952

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

I was asked yesterday if some arrangement could be made to answer questions which appear on the order paper, and to have motions for production of papers considered. I promised to have a word with the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) and with the leaders of the other groups to see what might appear to be most convenient to them in that regard. Of course if the special order were exhausted in the meantime the question would not arise; but if the debate on the address is still continuing I would suggest, Mr. Speaker, that on Wednesday next, before the special order is called, you call questions and notices of motions for production of papers.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to make a brief statement in regard to the handling of out-of-condition grain arising from the 1951 crop in the prairie provinces. I am making this statement on behalf of my colleague the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) as well as on my own behalf.

As members of the house know, the 1951 grain crop in the west was harvested under very unfavourable circumstances. Of the grain which was harvested last fall, a large proportion was threshed in a tough and damp condition, which has created unprecedented problems for producers themselves, for the Canadian wheat board, the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada and for grain handling agencies. In addition, according to the dominion bureau of statistics, about 150 million bushels of wheat and 135 million bushels of oats and barley still remain to be threshed.

According to the records of the Canadian wheat board, about 186 million bushels of tough and damp wheat, oats, and barley have now been accepted at country elevators. This compares with 100 million bushels of

tough and damp grain accepted at country elevators in the preceding crop year when the problem of out-of-condition grain was regarded as particularly serious.

Substantial progress has been made in disposing of tough wheat, oats and barley, and about 50 million bushels of tough and damp grain have been dried in terminal elevators at the Pacific coast, in the lake-head and in interior terminal elevators. In addition, damp wheat is being shipped to the United States for drying. However, there are still substantial stocks of tough and damp grain in public storage, and it will be some time before these stocks can be disposed of or dried.

In addition to the quantities of tough and damp grain delivered to the board and the quantities of these deliveries which remain in store, there is a considerable quantity of damp grain which was threshed last fall and still remains on farms. On the basis of recent surveys carried out by the board there were about 36 million bushels of threshed damp wheat on farms in the prairie provinces in mid-February. In addition, there were substantial quantities of threshed tough wheat and threshed tough and damp oats and barley on farms awaiting delivery.

The next sixty to eighty days will be critical from the standpoint of the delivery of present farm stocks of threshed out-ofcondition grain. It is the policy to provide delivery opportunity for these farm stocks of tough and damp grain as soon as physically possible. It will be difficult to complete this task before the warm weather sets in. Producers having tough and damp grain on their farms will have to exercise unusual care in maintaining the condition of these stocks until they can be delivered at country elevators. This, broadly, is the problem which lies ahead in handling threshed out-of-condition grain now on farms.

In view of the circumstances which I have described, I would like to appeal to all producers with unthreshed grain on their farms to use their best efforts to see that their spring threshing does not add to the present problem of out-of-condition grain. Under the circumstances which now prevail, no assurance can be given that there will be a prompt delivery opportunity for grain which is harvested this spring in a tough or damp condition. It should also be emphasized

Grain

that if grain is threshed in the spring with a high moisture content and when the weather is warm, it would be most difficult for handling companies to maintain the condition of this grain in country elevators and while in transit to terminal elevators. This fact should be seriously considered by producers before undertaking the threshing of grain still in the fields in the prairie provinces.

It is apparent that even if spring harvesting is confined to the threshing of dry grain, deliveries of out-of-condition grain for the crop year 1951-52 will total at least 250 million bushels. This is an unprecedented quantity of out-of-condition grain to be received in any crop year, and is taxing and will continue to tax our grain handling facilities to the limit. While a large percentage of the threshed out-of-condition grain has now been delivered at country elevators, substantial farm stocks still remain in certain areas. These areas are now well defined, and the extent of the remaining problem is known. To relieve these areas the best efforts of the Canadian wheat board, the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada, the transport controller, the handling companies and the railways will be continued.

With the co-operation of all concerned, and especially with the co-operation of producers in respect to their spring threshing, losses arising from the harvesting of so much out-of-condition grain from the 1951 crop can be held at minimum levels. The coming of an early spring will greatly assist in handling the over-all problem of out-of-condition grain, but will make it more difficult for producers to maintain the condition of tough and damp wheat on farms until delivery can be effected.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

Is there any estimate as to the amount of uncut or unthreshed grain?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

Yes, there is.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

That is, in addition to the amount stored on the farms.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

There are about 150 million bushels of wheat and 135 million bushels of oats and barley still unthreshed.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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CCF

Hazen Robert Argue

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Argue:

I should like to ask the minister a supplementary question. Has he any knowledge of the available supply of small grain driers, and the success there has been in using them? Of what value are they?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
Permalink
LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

Yes. I do not remember the exact number that have been brought into use-perhaps it would be forty or fifty. They contribute very little to the over-all problem, and, unless they are handled by experts there is grave danger that they may damage the wheat. I notice that the press

[Mr. Howe.l

has been publishing photographs of loaves of bread made from standard wheat and loaves from wheat coming from these driers. The photographs indicate that the driers can easily cook the wheat so that it has no commercial value. I think that the small driers are making small contribution to the over-all problem.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. Fair:

I should like to ask a further supplementary question. Is it not true that in the press of a few days ago great praise was given to those who are handling the small driers, and that very little damage has been done to the quality of the wheat?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

I have beard of the damage that has been done, and not of the good results. However, I am sure there is a fair proportion of both.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
Permalink
SC

Robert Fair

Social Credit

Mr. Fair:

I believe a couple of driers were taken in, and the work done by them was improved when it was shown that they were not doing a'good job.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   QUESTIONS AND MOTIONS FOR PRODUCTION OF PAPERS
Sub-subtopic:   HANDLING OF OUT-OF-CONDITION WHEAT, OATS AND BARLEY
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REVISED STATUTES

PUBLICATION AND DISTRIBUTION

LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Solicitor General of Canada; Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Stuart S. Garson (Minister of Justice):

Mr. Speaker, on Wednesday last the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) asked me to report upon the progress in the revision of the statutes. I said then, offhand, that I thought it would take several months, but that I would look into the matter and make a further report, which is as follows:

The statute revision commission was appointed in February, 1949, and immediately after the appointment of the commission a legal and clerical staff was employed by the commission to assist in the consolidation and revision of the statutes. The work has proceeded according to the following successive stages: (1) Preparation of a consolidation from the official texts of the statutes; (2) printing the consolidation; (3) correction of page proofs by clerical staff and revising by the commission of the first print in accordance with the statute revision act; (4) reprinting the revised print; (5) verifying the reprint; and (6) final printing and binding.

In order to complete the whole task as quickly as possible, work on all these stages has proceeded concurrently to the fullest extent that circumstances would permit.

The first three stages are completed and the fourth stage is eighty per cent completed. The fifth stage, namely, verification of the reprint, commenced on the first of March, 1952, and it is expected that the last stage,

namely, final printing and binding, will commence before the end of the current month.

The original consolidation was prepared by a legal staff engaged by the commission, but the work of the revision has been done by the commission itself. Since the work of consolidation is complete, the legal staff of the commission has been reduced to one, who is supervising the printing and is preparing the tables and indexes.

It is expected that the reprinting of the revised prints will be completed this month, that all final text will have been submitted to the queen's printer by the end of April, and that the final printing and binding will be completed towards the end of the current year or early in 1953.

At the last session of parliament the commission was authorized to prepare a supplementary volume to include the statutes enacted at the current session of parliament. The preparation of the supplementary volume will commence at the end of the current session and the supplementary volume will be issued at the same time as the main revision.

In the case of the 1927 revision there were approximately fifty months between the appointment of the commission and the effective date of the revision. It is expected that slightly less time will be required for the new revision, although the material is twenty-five per cent greater, and the task of preparing the consolidation and revision has been complicated somewhat by the fact that during the present revision parliament has been in session for longer periods than was the case in the years immediately preceding the 1927 revision.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES
Subtopic:   PUBLICATION AND DISTRIBUTION
Sub-subtopic:   PROGRESS
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AWARDS AND DECORATIONS

APPROVAL BY HER MAJESTY OF WEARING OF KOREAN MEDAL

LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. Brooke Claxlon (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members will be interested to learn that yesterday word was received that Her Majesty the Queen has graciously approved the wearing of the Korean medal, which was authorized by His late Majesty King George VI for the commonwealth forces.

Topic:   AWARDS AND DECORATIONS
Subtopic:   APPROVAL BY HER MAJESTY OF WEARING OF KOREAN MEDAL
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EMERGENCY GOLD MINING ASSISTANCE ACT

March 7, 1952