February 29, 1952

THE MINISTRY

POSTMASTER GENERAL

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, before you take up the orders of the day there are three or four matters which according to the rules and practice are required to be dealt with at this time.

First of all, I should like to announce officially for the record that the Hon. G. Edouard Rinfret resigned as Postmaster General on February 13, 1952, and that Mr. Alcide Cote, member for St. Jean-Iberville-Napierville, was appointed Postmaster General on the same day. I should like to table the order in council making the appointment.

I should like to announce for the record that Mr. G. J. Mcllraith resigned as parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Defence Production on February 5, 1952, and that Mr. John Horace Dickey, senior member for Halifax, was appointed parliamentary assistant to the Minister of Defence Production on February 12, 1952. I now table the appropriate orders in council.

Topic:   THE MINISTRY
Subtopic:   POSTMASTER GENERAL
Sub-subtopic:   ASSISTANT TO MINISTER OF DEFENCE PRODUCTION
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STANDING COMMITTEES


Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister) moved: That a special committee be appointed to prepare and report, with all convenient speed, lists of members to compose the standing committees of this house under standing order 63, said committee to be composed of Messrs. Fournier (Hull), Harris (Grey-Bruce), Casselman, Shaw and Weir. Motion agreed to.


INTERNAL ECONOMY COMMISSION


Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister) presented the following message from His Excellency the Governor General: The governor general transmits to the House of Commons a certified copy of an approved minute of council appointing the Hon. Alphonse Fournier, Minister of Public Works, the Hon. Douglas Abbott, Minister of Finance, the Hon. J. J. McCann, Minister of National Revenue and the Hon. F. G. Bradley, Secretary of State of Canada, to act with the Speaker of the House of Commons as commissioners for the purposes and under the provisions of chapter 145 of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927, intituled: An act respecting the House of Commons.


APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES OF THE WHOLE

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to move, seconded by the Minister of Defence Production (Mr. Howe):

That Louis Rene Beaudoin, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Vaudreuil-Soulanges, Quebec, be appointed deputy chairman of committees of the whole house.

Topic:   APPOINTMENT OF DEPUTY CHAIRMAN OF COMMITTEES OF THE WHOLE
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Motion agreed to.


TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBERS

THE LATE HEBER HAROLD HATFIELD

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, since the last session of parliament two of the members of this house have passed away. I refer of course to the former members for Victoria-Carleton and Brome-Missisquoi.

It was with deep regret, shared by all of us, that we learned of the death of Mr. Heber H. Hatfield following a lengthy period of ill health. Born in 1885 at Middle Simonds, New Brunswick, and educated there, it was not long before Mr. Hatfield moved to Hart-land where he was to become prominent as a large scale producer of and dealer in potatoes and potato products. Following several years of service in the municipal field, Mr. Hatfield was elected to parliament for the electoral district of Victoria-Carleton in. the general election of 1940, and re-elected in 1945 and 1949.

Though giving close attention always to all the work of parliament, he was constant and firm in his efforts to interest Canada and, indeed, other parts of the world in the products of his native province. As a result he did much to increase the prosperity of many New Brunswickers and to enhance the name of Canada as a source of choice seed potatoes. Mr. Hatfield will be missed by his constituents, by his business associates, by the potato growers of all the maritime region, and by those, not only of his own party, with whom he was so closely associated as a member of parliament. He will be remembered

10 HOUSE OF

Tributes to Deceased Members both in the business world and in parliament not only for his successful career but also for his unquestioned integrity and his fairness.

To Mrs. Hatfield and her family the sincere sympathy of all of the members of this house goes out in full measure.

(Translation):

Mr. Speaker, the death of Mr. Henri A. Gosselin has been a shock to his numerous friends who had believed him to be in fairly good health.

Mr. Gosselin was bom in Lee, Massachusetts, in 1887. His parents were French-Canadian. A few years later, his family returned to Canada and he was educated in Sherbrooke.

In 1914 he joined the Canadian Pacific Railway. While working as a train dispatcher, in Farnham, he spent a great deal of time in agricultural pursuits.

For a great many years, Mr. Gosselin was an active participant in the political life of his community, of his province and of his country. From 1928 to 1938, he was mayor of Farnham; from 1939 to 1948, he sat for Missisquoi in the Quebec legislature; and in 1949, he was elected federal member for the constituency of Brome-Missisquoi.

On the floor of this house he spoke calmly and easily, with sobriety and sureness of judgment, in either of our two official languages.

During the relatively short time he sat here, Mr. Gosselin acquired our respect and friendship. I am therefore confident that you will join me in extending to his widow and to his family our most sincere sympathy.

(Text):

Topic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBERS
Subtopic:   THE LATE HEBER HAROLD HATFIELD
Sub-subtopic:   HENRI A. GOSSELIN
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) in expressing the regret which we all feel in the loss of two of the members of this house, Mr. Heber Hatfield and Mr. Henri Gosselin.

Mr. Hatfield, as every member will so well recall, was an example of the well-informed specialist in a subject close to Ills heart. He contributed greatly to the work of the house by being able to speak not only about the development of the potato industry and potato products but also about his own county and province in a way that helped that province and advanced the general interests of the country, as the Prime Minister has already said.

Mr. Hatfield was associated with many activities in addition to those about which we heard frequently in the house. In fact it seemed that he was associated with most of the worth-while activities in the town of

Hantland, and he had a privilege that most of us do not share. In addition to being in public life, he was also interested in a newspaper, and thus was able to express many of his thoughts through channels not available to most other members- He was an indefatigable worker on behalf of the constituents whom he served. I am sure the ministers of the crown can certify best of all that, regardless of the political views of those who came to him, he was a persistent representative in their departments and served his constituents well in seeking to have those things done which they believed could be done by the departments of the government.

As happens in so many cases, Mr. Hatfield had extended municipal experience, as warden of his county, as mayor of Hartland and through his association with the many voluntary organizations upon which our social life so largely depends. He showed great courage, more than the courage called for by the ordinary daily responsibilities. I think most hon. members are aware that for some considerable time it took courage of a very high order to appear in this chamber and carry on his work in the cheerful and friendly way that he did.

In extending to Mrs. Hatfield and the members of the family the sympathy which has been expressed by the Prime Minister on behalf of all members of the house, may I say that Mrs. Hatfield herself deserves that recognition to which so many of the wives of the members of parliament are entitled. She deserves our respect particularly for the way in which she sustained and cheered him during a considerable period when she knew much better than he that his days were numbered.

I therefore join with the Prime Minister, as I am sure every other member does, in extending sympathy to the members of the family and expressing the earnest hope that the knowledge that his associates in the House of Commons are thinking of them at this time may bring some measure of comfort at a time when doubtless their thoughts will be here in Ottawa and they will be recalling the occasions on which he and his family attended the opening of parliament.

I also wish to join with the Prime Minister in his words of sympathy to the family of Mr. Gosselin. He was a man who had won many friends here, and he will be greatly missed. He had served his community well, as Mr. Hatfield did, and this indicates the extent to which municipal experience frequently paves the way to representation of the wider field. He had served his own community well, not only as a councillor and as mayor, but also in the

legislature of Quebec. As a result of that combined experience he was able to bring good judgment to his consideration of the subjects that came before .him in the House of Commons. All the members of this house will join in expressing regret that this faithful servant of his own community should have been taken from us.

Topic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBERS
Subtopic:   THE LATE HEBER HAROLD HATFIELD
Sub-subtopic:   HENRI A. GOSSELIN
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, we too join in extending sympathy to the families of the two members who have left us and passed to the great beyond. We are reminded of the transitory nature of life when invariably at the opening of a session we have to mourn the loss of some of our colleagues. The tributes that have been paid in this instance I think have expressed what we all feel in regard to the deceased members and their work in this parliament.

Mr. Hatfield was a member for some years, and sat very near the place from which I am speaking this afternoon. I came to know him rather well and to appreciate the interest he took in the work of the house, especially in the field in which he was particularly qualified. I knew of his assiduous efforts on behalf of the people he represented.

Mr. Gosselin was a newer member, but he had also made some impression upon the house. We appreciated the fact that he took a great interest in the ordinary workers of his constituency, at one time having been, as the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) has said, an employee of one of our great railway systems.

We join in expressing our sympathy to the bereaved families; and may I also express our sympathy to the Prime Minister and the leader of the official opposition (Mr. Drew) on each having lost one of his colleagues in this house.

Topic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBERS
Subtopic:   THE LATE HEBER HAROLD HATFIELD
Sub-subtopic:   HENRI A. GOSSELIN
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SC

John Horne Blackmore

Social Credit

Mr. J. H. Blackmore (Lethbridge):

Mr. Speaker, the members of my group have asked me to say a few words on this sad occasion in appreciation of these two fine men. I had the opportunity of rather close association with Mr. Hatfield, as he and I had offices in the same corridor, and once in a while exchanged views.

In a conspicuous place on the front page of the Hartland Observer of New Bruns-.wick, under date of January 10, 1952, an article appeared entitled "Impressive final tribute paid H. H. Hatfield, M.P., Sunday." In it I find these words:

A man who loved his community and its people, and who served them well, rests today in the quiet country graveyard nestled in the windswept hills of the little Saint John river valley town of Hartland.

55704-2J

Tributes to Deceased Members As the shadows of a wintry day swept silently over the hillside, all that was mortal of Heber Harold Hatfield, the town's first citizen, was tenderly laid to rest while relatives and friends stood with bowed heads.

An hour before the service the United Baptist church was filled to capacity, and hundreds were unable to gain admittance.

I thought those comments, coming from the people who knew Mr. Hatfield best, might appropriately be mentioned here.

The provincial leader of the opposition in New Brunswick used some words concerning Mr. Hatfield with which I am sure the members of this house will agree. He referred to "his great capacity for action" and "his ability to create confidence"; to his "honesty", "kindness" and "tolerance". I believe generally speaking all the members of this house were impressed by Mr. Hatfield in just that way.

I shall not repeat what has already been said about our departed member by the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Drew). We desire to join in extending heartfelt sympathy to Mrs. Hatfield and all others bereaved by the loss of this fine man, as we also extend sympathy to the leader of the opposition on the loss of a valuable supporter.

With respect to Mr. Gosselin, we did not have much opportunity to get to know him. When men come and sit with us for a short time we do not really get to know them very well; but I did gain the impression that this man was courageous, conscientious and high-minded. We desire to extend sympathy to all those bereaved by his passing, and we sympathize with the Prime Minister in the loss of this good supporter.

Topic:   TRIBUTES TO DECEASED MEMBERS
Subtopic:   THE LATE HEBER HAROLD HATFIELD
Sub-subtopic:   HENRI A. GOSSELIN
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LIVESTOCK

OUTBREAK OF FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE IN THE REGINA AREA

LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture):

Mr. Speaker, I thought that at the very beginning of the session I should make a statement to the house about the recent outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease among cattle in the Regina district.

This is the first outbreak of this disease in Canada within the memory of living men. While nearly every other country in the world, including the United States, has had some cases, and in several countries the disease is endemic, until now Canada has managed, by reason of careful precautionary measures, to maintain a clean bill of health. I think this remarkable record is a tribute to the zeal and care of those charged with the responsibility of administering the regulations.

Foot-and-mouth disease

At an appropriate time I will deal at length with the discovery and detection of the disease in the Regina district. At the moment I only wish to say that as soon as there was any suspicion that the vesicular malady discovered in that area might be foot-and-mouth disease, an area sufficiently large to take in all known cases was quarantined by the veterinary director general under the authority of the Animal Contagious Diseases Act, and every recent movement of cattle out of the area has been traced.

At this point I would like to emphasize the fact that this area is very small, only fifty miles square, constituting about one-fiftieth of the settled portion of the province of Saskatchewan. I wanted to emphasize that because while this disease requires that sufficient publicity be given to it, I am afraid the publicity in this instance has been such as to give the impression that the disease is much more widespread in Canada than the facts known up to the moment would indicate. There are about twenty-three cases of the disease which have been established. They are all within an area fifty miles square surrounding the city of Regina, which is at about the centre of the area. It has been rumoured that the disease has been found in other parts of the country. We have checked all those rumours, and up to the present have found no cases outside that area. I am very glad to be able to say that so far the disease does not seem to have spread outside the quarantine area, and that within the area itself there have been no new cases for several days. Every rumour of an outbreak outside the area is at once checked and a quarantine imposed if there is suspicion.

As soon as the existence of foot-and-mouth disease was suspected, the government also notified the United States authorities and a United States veterinarian was on location immediately. Not only did we wish to have the advantage of the skilled assistance of the United States bureau of animal industry, which has had long experience in Mexico where there have been serious outbreaks in recent years, but we also wished to assure the United States government that everything possible was being done to stamp out the disease, if indeed it proved to be the foot-and-mouth variety.

On Sunday last our laboratories at Hull notified us that the vesicular malady was definitely foot-and-mouth disease, and on the following day a public announcement was made to that effect. It was also

announced that the infected animals and those which might have been in contact with

the disease were being destroyed, the farmers compensated, and the affected farms disinfected. These operations are now under way. .

Meanwhile, as we knew would happen, the United States government imposed an embargo on the shipment from Canada of live cattle, sheep and swine, and fresh killed or frozen meat from these animals. The shipment of hay and straw, and of certain animal products, is also made subject to certain restrictions. The details of these regulations are available, and I shall not attempt to elaborate them at this time. The United States government made it clear, however, that the embargo does not apply to grains.

This embargo and these other restrictions have been imposed under mandatory United States legislation, which has been in effect for many years.

As far as the United States administration is concerned, there is no discretion to restrict the embargo to areas or regions, that is the act does not provide them with discretion to pick out certain areas. The embargo must apply to the whole country. Under the United States law the embargo cannot be lifted until the Secretary of Agriculture gives notice that the disease no longer exists in the foreign country. We have also been advised that, under the order issued by the United States bureau of animal industry applying to Canada, the embargo cannot be lifted for a period of sixty days after Canada has been declared free of foot-and-mouth disease.

I think I should say that ever since the outbreak of the disease was suspected the United States authorities have been most sympathetic and helpful, and I am convinced that they are as anxious as we are to bring this scourge under control and to see normal trade resumed with a minimum of delay.

While I am hopeful that the action taken will be fully successful, there is no doubt that some losses will be incurred before the disease is eliminated and the embargo on movement to the United States removed. Farmers whose livestock have to be destroyed will, as I have already said, be compensated. In addition, the government is not unmindful of the serious losses that may result from the interference in the sale of livestock and animal products to the United States.

The situation is being watched carefully and as further measures to protect the interests of producers are required these will be brought into effect. What form these measures should take, if they prove to be required, has been inquired into.

At this point I should like to tell the house that the government will find it most difficult to be regulated in their actions by the usual practice of bringing every action which we may contemplate before this house before action is taken. I believe that can be quite well understood. For example, we are meeting today and will not meet again until Monday. Matters which are most important may come up in the meantime, and we may find it necessary to proceed without waiting to make an announcement on the floor of the house. All these matters have been considered as fully as possible under the circumstances, and we are prepared to take action when the necessity arises. We do not think it wise to be making announcements of action which it may not be necessary to take.

Farmers would be well advised to refrain from panic selling of their stock at this time, as the government does not intend to let this important part of the Canadian livestock industry bear the whole brunt of this unfortunate development. We fare actively investigating alternative outlets for our livestock and animal products. Until the picture becomes clearer, farmers should limit deliveries of livestock, in so far as this is practicable. It should be apparent, and I consider this important, that stock delivered before ready for slaughter cannot be returned for further feeding. In other words, the farmers would be well advised to keep on their farms livestock which is not prepared for slaughter until further notice, as I believe it will be absolutely necessary to slaughter all animals which do come to plants in certain areas whether or not they are ready for slaughter. This can only result in lower returns to those who deliver animals in that condition.

Perhaps I should also add a word about internal measures to prevent the spread of the disease within Canada. It is the view of the government that quarantine arrangements can best be established by the federal authorities. We have legislation now which provides for that, and we have always acted under it. Every action which can be taken to take care of our responsibility in that regard has been taken, and we feel that it would be best if the matter of quarantine were dealt with by the federal authorities.

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   OUTBREAK OF FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE IN THE REGINA AREA
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Mr. Speaker, may I be allowed to ask a question at this time? The minister stated that the farmers whose cattle were destroyed, that is those actively infected or those in association with cattle that were found to be suffering from the disease, would be compensated. I have received a number of telegrams from farmers in the infected area, and they want to know what the nature of the compensation will be. They particularly want

Foot-and-mouth disease to know whether the government will give consideration to allowing special compensation in addition to commercial value in respect of purebred dairy cattle or purebred show cattle. Unless some compensation along that line is granted by the department, the loss in the area will be very large because the herds are, in the main, purebred.

When the minister is replying, there is one other point I believe he should clarify. The press in Saskatchewan has stated that it was in November that the existence of this disease was first suspected and the question submitted to veterinarians with a view to ascertaining whether it was in fact hoof-and-mouth disease. Will the minister state whether or not that is correct, and what took place between November and February, or give reasons for the delay in not acting sooner to preserve the country as a whole from the catastrophe that now faces it in so far as the livestock industry is concerned?

Topic:   LIVESTOCK
Subtopic:   OUTBREAK OF FOOT-AND-MOUTH DISEASE IN THE REGINA AREA
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February 29, 1952