December 21, 1951

PRIVILEGE

REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION

LIB

Joseph Miville Dechene

Liberal

Mr. J. M. Dechene (Alhabaska):

Mr. Speaker, I rise on a question of privilege. I do not very often take up the time of the house. May I remind hon. members that I have not taken one minute during this session. Yesterday afternoon perhaps I was somewhat out of order when, good-naturedly and in the spirit of Christmas at this time of the year when we are again preparing to celebrate the anniversary of the Prince of Peace, I interjected, when the leader of the opposition was speaking, the words "Merry Christmas". If I did wrong I am willing to apologize but I do not think I did, and I do not think I deserved the answer made by the hon. gentleman. I have last night's Ottawa Journal which carries this report as to what the leader of the opposition replied:

"I am glad to see one of the members has anticipated the season," said Mr. Drew.

Such an insinuation was not deserved by me from that or any other comer of the house. I remind the hon. gentleman that those who live in glass houses should not throw stones. But this matter goes further.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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?

Some hon. Members:

Order.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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LIB

Joseph Miville Dechene

Liberal

Mr. Dechene:

I wish to take just a few minutes, Mr. Speaker. The hon. members who are calling order have wasted hours and hours during this session and I have not. I am getting to be an aged man. I have been in public life for fifty years. I was elected a member of the Alberta legislature over thirty years ago, and I can boast that the reputation I left there is a good one. So far as the electors of the constituency of Athabaska are concerned, an unjust, unfair and uncalled-for insinuation of that kind will not do me any harm because I am too well known. It will only mean that the hon. gentleman's party will lose the few votes they had in that constituency. I am entitled to say that. I have some justice coming to me in this house as well as the hon. gentleman. I can trace my ancestry back to 1764.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Drew:

Mr. Speaker,-

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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PC

Gordon Knapman Fraser

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fraser:

There is a limit.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Probably the hon. member has gone far enough.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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LIB

Joseph Miville Dechene

Liberal

Mr. Dechene:

I have a family to defend and a reputation to protect.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

I do not think the hon. member's reputation has been attacked in this house. I have given him considerable latitude. Probably he might conclude with a few remarks.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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LIB

Joseph Miville Dechene

Liberal

Mr. Dechene:

I was only going to make a few more remarks. Ever since 1774 and the passing of the Quebec Act both sides of my family have been represented in the House of Commons or in the legislature either of Quebec or of Alberta. I am proud of that; and we will not stop there. That is why I felt I had to raise this matter and deny the insinuation.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of ihe Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I must confess that I

am wholly unable to understand what the hon. member for Athabaska is speaking about. It will be recalled that during the debate yesterday, at a time when I was speaking and when we were discussing matters before the house, there was a very loud and clear interjection, "Merry Christmas, Merry Christmas". I said I was very pleased to note that one hon. member was anticipating the season. I think a great many hon. members have indicated clearly that they are anticipating it. It was in that sense I meant my remark, and if the hon. member has taken any other meaning I am sure he has taken a meaning that was not the proper or correct interpretation of the words.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, today is another day, and I am sure we were all glad this morning when we got up to see that the blustery weather of yesterday had subsided. I thank the leader of the opposition for the remarks he has made about the hon. member who raised a question of privilege. I am sure all hon. members understood the remark of the leader of the opposition in the sense he has indicated and not as disparaging in any way, because I know that all members hold the hon. member for Athabaska in high regard and recognize that he deserves our respect and friendship.

Business of the House BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

Topic:   PRIVILEGE
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO REMARK IN DEBATE OF LEADER OF THE OPPOSITION
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MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNTIL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27


Righl Hon. L. S. SI. Laurent (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, yesterday I indicated in reply to an observation from the other side of the house that if it should prove necessary for hon. members to return after Christmas to complete the business of the session I would give notice today that the government would move to apply closure in respect of the second reading of Bill No. 36. That statement was made on the assumption that both yesterday and today would have been taken up with the debate on second reading of that bill, and it would have been made rather clear that repetitious debate might go on indefinitely under the ordinary yules. As a matter of fact the bill was not debated yesterday, and the government wishes it to be abundantly clear that no member is to be deprived of his right to make his position quite clear on that bill. I will therefore not give any such notice today, and I hope that the progress that may be made under the ordinary rules will be such that it will not be appropriate to give that notice at any time. With respect to the notice of motion that has been on the order paper, that was not put on in any arbitrary spirit but merely because I felt that, if it should become clear that we could not finish the business of the house before Christmas, hon. members would wish to have at leasrt a long week end for Christmas, and that would require a derogation from the orders that have been made. When notices of motion are called, if it were satisfactory to the house, I would ask to have this motion stand until some time later today so that we could see then whether or not it will be appropriate to have it discussed. If, on the other hand, members prefer to have it dealt with immediately, I would of course move it in its regular order. But if it could stand until some time later today, it may be that we shall then see what would best suit the convenience of hon. members, because it is not the wish of the government to be arbitrary in this respect. On the order: Government notice of motion-The Prime Minister -Resolved, that notwithstanding any other previous order of this house, when this house adjourns on Friday, December 21, 1951, unless it be otherwise ordered at that time, it stand adjourned until Thursday, December 27. 1951, at eleven o'clock a.m.


LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Stand until later this day, if thait

is agreeable.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNTIL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27
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?

Some hon. Members:

Agreed.

Topic:   MOTION FOR ADJOURNMENT UNTIL THURSDAY, DECEMBER 27
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DUMPING OF TEXTILES ON CANADIAN MARKET


On the orders of the day:


PC

John Alpheus Charlton

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. A. Charlton (Brant-Wentworth):

should like to direct a question to the Minister of Trade and Commerce. Is the minister aware that nylons and textiles are being dumped on the Canadian market to the detriment of thousands of Canadian workers? Are any effective measures being taken to relieve this serious unemployment situation.

Topic:   DUMPING OF TEXTILES ON CANADIAN MARKET
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December 21, 1951