December 3, 1951

CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

Explain.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES OF CANADA
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PROVIDE FOR SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUME
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LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Solicitor General of Canada; Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. Garson:

The purpose of this bill is to authorize the statute revision commission to prepare a supplementary volume as part of the new revised statutes to contain any statutes that may be enacted between the time of going to press and the time of the appearance of the newly revised statutes.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   REVISED STATUTES OF CANADA
Subtopic:   AMENDMENT TO PROVIDE FOR SUPPLEMENTARY VOLUME
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QUESTIONS

IMMIGRATION

PLACEMENT SERVICE

PC

Mr. Churchill:

Progressive Conservative

1. Is the Department of Citizenship and Immigration operating a placement service for immigrants?

2. Does the national employment service also operate a placement service for immigrants?

3. Does the Department of Citizenship and Immigration, and also the Department of Labour, have officials in the field seeking places of employment for immigrants?

4. If so, how many officials, and in what areas?

5. What is the division of responsibility between the two departments in placing immigrants?

6. Do the departments above-mentioned absorb the cost of movement of immigrants from the point of entry into Canada to the point of employment?

7. Does the Department of Citizenship and Immigration or the Department of Labour seek co-operation of or consult with provincial governments in placing immigrants?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   PLACEMENT SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   COST OF MOVEMENT
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LIB

Mr. Harris (Grey-Bruce): (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

1. The Department of Citizenship and Immigration operates a settlement service for the purpose of locating and developing suitable opportunities for immigrants who come to Canada to settle on farms, or establish small businesses of their own. The department also helps immigrants secure employment, and handles applications from employers for immigrant workers.

2. The facilities of the national employment service are available to, and used by, immigrant workers. Employment office officials keep in close touch with the hostels and assist in referring immigrant workers to prospective employers.

3. See answers to Nos. 1 and 2.

4. The immigration branch of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration has one settlement officer at each of the following locations: Vancouver, Edmonton, Regina,

Winnipeg, London, Toronto, Montreal, Quebec and Halifax. These officers are assisted, as required, by immigration inspectors and other staff of the immigration branch throughout the dominion.

In national employment offices certain placement officials have the duty of keeping in close contact with employers in their area in order that they may advise the employers where workmen can be obtained to meet their needs. The total number of placement officers

in the national employment service varies, depending upon the season of the year. When the claim load is great the duties of the placement officers change in some instances and the staff of the unemployment insurance commission works as a unit as between duties applying to unemployment insurance and placement work. The total number of men and women engaged on placement work in Canada varies from approximately 900 to 1,200.

5. The whole immigration movement is primarily the responsibility of the Department of Citizenship and Immigration. This involves development of settlement opportunities in Canada, recruitment and selection overseas, admission, assistance in becoming established, and integration into Canadian society with attainment of full Canadian citizenship as the objective.

As stated in the answer to No. 1, the settlement service of the immigration branch, Department of Citizenship and Immigration, locates and develops farm and business opportunities. The national employment service places immigrants brought in under group or bulk movements to meet general labour shortages, or the needs of employers who apply to the labour department for the admission of a number of workers. The facilities of both departments are available to the large body of immigrants, should they be seeking employment, thus placing a widespread placement or settlement service at their disposal. The whole operation is recognized as one which can best be carried out by the closest possible co-operation between the two departments. The facilities of the national employment service are available to immigrants as well as other residents of Canada.

6. The department of citizenship has been authorized to provide for the absorption of the cost of inland rail transportation west of Winnipeg for immigrants who come to Canada under the assisted passage loan scheme who remain for one year in the class of employment for which they were selected.

The Department of Labour absorbs the cost of inland transportation for immigrant domestics, and farm workers who are brought forward in group movements.

7. Yes.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   PLACEMENT SERVICE
Sub-subtopic:   COST OF MOVEMENT
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IMMIGRATION

PASSAGE FARES, GROUP MOVEMENTS, ETC.

PC

Gordon Minto Churchill

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Churchill:

With reference to immigrants entering Canada since January 1. 1951, and by country of origin:

1. How many paid their own fare?

2. How many had their fare paid by the international refugee organization?

3. How many had fares paid by sponsors in Canada?

4. How many received assisted passage loans?

Questions

5. How many were brought in under group movements by (a) the Department of Citizenship and Immigration: (b) the Department of Labour?

6. How many immigrants entered Canada who did not fall into any of the above classes?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   PASSAGE FARES, GROUP MOVEMENTS, ETC.
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LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Mr. Harris (Grey-Bruce):

(To September 30, 1951)

1. 82,700.

2. 18,844.

3. 15,287 (prepaid passages).

4. 6,202.

5. Group movements include bulk movements to meet a general shortage of labour, and applications from employers for a specific number of workers. Such applications from employers may be made to the Department of Labour or the Department of Citizenship and Immigration, but with the exception of those admissible classes covered by sections I, 2 and 3 of order in council P.C. 2856, dated 9 June, 1950, they are cleared with the other department before being approved. It is not possible to divide the total group movement to indicate the number "brought in" by either department, but the total is 14,564. Most of these immigrants could be considered as having been brought in under the auspices of the Department of Labour.

6. 6,852 (not falling within classes 1 to 4 inclusive. The group movement figures are included in the other answers).

Note: With the consent of the member the various parts have not been broken down into countries of origin.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   PASSAGE FARES, GROUP MOVEMENTS, ETC.
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IMMIGRATION

DIRECTED EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA'

PC

Mr. Churchill:

Progressive Conservative

1. Do sponsored or nominated immigrants sign an agreement to take directed employment?

2. H so, of those who have signed agreements to take directed employment, how many have carried out their agreements under the following categories with respect to the years 1949, 1950, 1951 (a) skilled machinists; (b) bush workers; (c) mine workers; (d) farm workers; (e) domestic workers; (f) other categories?

3. How many in the above categories have been brought in by the Department of Citizenship and Immigration, and how many by the Department of Labour, since January 1, 1951?

4. Is refusal or failure to carry out an agreement to take directed employment a deportable offence and, if not, is there any other penalty?

5. Are the penalties exacted? If so, in how many cases for each of the years 1949, 1950 and 1951?

6. Has the Department of Labour followed the practice of demanding $150 (less $12.50 a month worked on contract) from d.p.'s in directed employment? If so, under what authority has this been done?

7. Has the Department of Citizenship and Immigration followed the practice indicated in (6) above?

8. How many cases have occurred in (6) and (7) above?

Questions

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   DIRECTED EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA'
Sub-subtopic:   DISPLACED PERSONS
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LIB

Mr. Harris (Grey-Bruce): (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

1. No.

2 to 5. Not applicable in view of answer to No. 1.

6. Yes. When arrangements were first made in 1947 with the international refugee organization for the group movement of displaced persons it was provided that workers who failed to fulfil their voluntary undertaking to the Minister of Labour would be required as a deterrent to pay $150 less a credit of $12.50 for each month which they did work in accordance with the voluntary undertaking.

7. D.p.'s who came forward in bulk movements to directed employment have all been handled by the Department of Labour.

8. (6) 1949-50, 445; 1950-51, 155; 1951-52, 59; (7) not applicable.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   DIRECTED EMPLOYMENT IN CANADA'
Sub-subtopic:   DISPLACED PERSONS
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FILM BOARD-"HOW TO BUILD AN IGLOO"

PC

Mr. Charlion:

Progressive Conservative

1. What was the total cost for the production of the national film board picture, "How to Build an Igloo?"

2. What distribution has there been on this film to date?

Topic:   FILM BOARD-"HOW TO BUILD AN IGLOO"
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LIB

Mr. Winters: (Minister of Resources and Development)

Liberal

1. $2,831.01.

2. This film was made from purchased footage and released early in 1950. Prints placed in circulation are as follows: Canada, non-theatrical and circuit prints-69; abroad, through various non-commercial channels- 61. In addition 96 prints of the film have

been sold in Canada and abroad. Audience totals are reported only in respect to nontheatrical distribution in Canada, the total to August 31, 1951, being 242,345. This film is also in active circulation on a contract with Times Television Inc., New York, through television channels in the U.S.A., and has been televised on 12 stations to date.

Topic:   FILM BOARD-"HOW TO BUILD AN IGLOO"
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ARMED FORCES

ENLISTMENTS AND DISCHARGES, 1951

December 3, 1951