November 26, 1951


Second report of the special committee on railway legislation.-Mr. McCulloch (for Mr. Cleaver). Questions QUESTIONS


GUT DAM

EFFECT ON WATER LEVELS OF LAKE ONTARIO

PC

Frank Exton Lennard

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Lennard:

What effect has the Gut dam at the easterly end of lake Ontario on the water levels of that lake?

He said: Mr. Speaker, I request that this question be dropped.

Topic:   GUT DAM
Subtopic:   EFFECT ON WATER LEVELS OF LAKE ONTARIO
Permalink
LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

Dropped.

Topic:   GUT DAM
Subtopic:   EFFECT ON WATER LEVELS OF LAKE ONTARIO
Permalink

STRATEGIC MATERIALS

PRICE FIXING AND SUPPLY FOR DOMESTIC USE

PC

James MacKerras Macdonnell

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Macdonnell (Greenwood):

Has the Minister of Trade and Commerce, in cases where for war purposes we shorten the supply of materials and the remainder is insufficient for domestic supplies, taken steps to fix prices on materials for domestic use and arrange distribution?

Topic:   STRATEGIC MATERIALS
Subtopic:   PRICE FIXING AND SUPPLY FOR DOMESTIC USE
Permalink
LIB

George James McIlraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Defence Production; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Mcllraiih:

For such materials as are in short supply, by reason of excessive demands to meet defence requirements, the government has appointed controllers to take charge of the distribution and no price increase for these materials can be made without prior approval being obtained from the controller. This applies particularly to steel, non-ferrous metals, sulphur and certain chemicals, at the present time.

Topic:   STRATEGIC MATERIALS
Subtopic:   PRICE FIXING AND SUPPLY FOR DOMESTIC USE
Permalink

CANADIAN WAR CLAIMS COMMISSION

CANADIANS RETURNED FROM JAPANESE PRISONS

PC

Mr. Fulion:

Progressive Conservative

1. Who are the personnel of the Canadian war claims commission, and what are their respective salaries?

2. What clerical and other staff does the commission have, and what are the total salaries for this staff?

3. What is the total number of claims from Canadians which the commission has under consideration?

4. Of these, how many are claims from Canadians who were imprisoned or interned by the Japanese?

5. Of the claims covered in part 4, when was the first one received?

6. Have any of these claims yet been paid?

7. What is the total of such claims?

8. What is the total of Japanese assets in the hands of the commission or of the custodian for distribution?

9. Have any interim payments been made on any of the claims?

10. If not, for what reason?

11. Have any Canadians been paid any money for the period during which they were interned or imprisoned?

12. Has the Canadian government done anything for returned Canadian civilian prisoners of the Japanese beyond arranging for their return to Canada?

Topic:   CANADIAN WAR CLAIMS COMMISSION
Subtopic:   CANADIANS RETURNED FROM JAPANESE PRISONS
Permalink
LIB

Mr. Bradley: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. Commissioner: Right Hon. J. L. Ilsley, Chief Justice of Nova Scotia, appointed by order in council of July 31, 1951, as an advisory commissioner on the method of dealing with war claims. No compensation.

Questions

2. Technical adviser: H. Carl Goldenberg, barrister, as and when services are required. Compensation $150 for each day during which he is s

3. The commissioner is acting in an advisory capacity only and will not make recommendations or awards on individual claims. The commissioner will recommend to the government which classes of claims should be paid in full, which in part only and which, if any, should be disallowed. Claims from approximately 4,000 Canadians have been received by the war claims branch of the custodian's office.

4. Claims have been submitted to the war claims branch on behalf of approximately 1,750 former prisoners of war of the Japanese and on behalf of approximately 125 former civilian internees or detainees of the Japanese.

5. December, 1943.

6. No.

7. Claims submitted on behalf of former prisoners of war of the Japanese total approximately $2 million, computed at the rate of $1 a day for every day of imprisonment; claims submitted on behalf of former civilian internees' or detainees of the Japaneise total approximately $625,000.

8. There are no Japanese assets in the hands of the commissioner. The custodian has under control approximately $3,425,000 of assets which formerly were owned by Japanese enemies. When the treaty of peace is ratified such assets will be at the disposal of the Canadian government.

9. None other than the following: (a) a few officers or employees of the government of Canada received compensation from the government in respect of loss of belongings incurred upon leaving their posts; and (b) a few Canadians were compensated by the governments of two or three Far Eastern countries under local schemes in respect of property losses.

10. There is no authority to make interim payments but this matter is under active consideration.

11. Former civilian internees or detainees have received nothing. Former prisoners of war were credited with their pay while imprisoned and in appropriate cases have received pensions if disabled as a result of imprisonment.

13. No, except that in some of the cases mentioned in (a) and (b) of No. 9 above the claimants so compensated may have been interned by the Japanese.

Topic:   CANADIAN WAR CLAIMS COMMISSION
Subtopic:   CANADIANS RETURNED FROM JAPANESE PRISONS
Permalink

DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION

MATERIAL SHORTAGES

LIB

Mr. Hellyer:

Liberal

1. What defence construction projects are held up by material shortages?

2. In each case, what are the specific materials and quantities that are not available?

Topic:   DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION
Subtopic:   MATERIAL SHORTAGES
Permalink
LIB

Mr. Mcllraiih: (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Defence Production; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. In carrying out the defence construction program, there have been a number of difficulties due to material shortages, resulting in delays in getting materials to the different sites as rapidly as might have been desired. However, as a result of government action and the co-operation of industry, there are only three cases where work is not proceeding because of material shortages.

2. The following defence construction projects are not proceeding because of material shortages: (i) Construction of RCEME

workshop for the army at Long Branch, Ontario. This project requires 224 tons of structural steel ordered on American mills. Delivery to the Canadian fabricator was set back from September to November due to changes in the American controlled material plan regulations. Fifty per cent of the requirement has now arrived at the fabricator's shop and is being fabricated. Present plans call for erection at the site to commence December 10. (ii) Chemical laboratory for the defence research board at Shirley's Bay, Ontario. This project requires 160 tons of structural steel. Originally an effort was made to place this order on an American mill but due to delays arising out of the controlled material plan regulations, the order was subsequently placed on a Canadian mill. Twenty-five tons have been delivered to the fabricator and the balance is to be delivered before December 31. Present undertaking of the fabricator is that erection will start not later than February 1, 1952. (iii) Construction of 250-man barrack block for the R.C.A.F. at Centralia, Ontario. This project requires 137 tons of structural steel ordered on American mills. Delivery to the Canadian fabricator was scheduled for October but was received in October and November. The delay arose due to changes in the American controlled material plan regulations. Fabrication is now being completed and erection at the site is to commence during the week of November 26.

Topic:   DEFENCE CONSTRUCTION
Subtopic:   MATERIAL SHORTAGES
Permalink

NATIONAL REVENUE

OFFICES IN SYDNEY, N.S.

CCF

Mr. Gillis:

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

1. How many offices does the Department of National Revenue occupy in the city of Sydney, Nova Scotia?

2. Are these offices owned by the government, rented or leased?

3. If rented or leased, from whom?

4. What rental is paid per year?

5. Does the rental paid include heating, lighting and janitor service?

6. If so, what amount of the rental is allocated for such services?

Topic:   NATIONAL REVENUE
Subtopic:   OFFICES IN SYDNEY, N.S.
Permalink

November 26, 1951