June 30, 1951

WAR MATERIALS

MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY

LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, as a matter of personal privilege I wish to point out that there is carried in the Montreal Gazette of this morning a report which bears the headline: "Ships carried war materiel to China-P.M." The report is a Canadian Press report, and it is an accurate report of the discussions which took place in this house yesterday, but the headline would convey to many a quite erroneous impression. "War materiel" is taken by many to mean munitions, supplies or equipment for armed forces. The report contains this paragraph, which is correct:

Mr. St. Laurent said the reason the ships carried to China materials Canada herself now bans for export to Red countries was that the materials were not placed on Britain's banned list until a few days ago. Now the British and Canadian lists were virtually the same.

It would be most unfortunate if this headline conveyed the impression that I was indicating to the house that Britain allowed "war materiel" to be carried to communist China. For a great many there is a substantial difference between what are classified as strategic materials and what is described as "war materiel". I was speaking of the items on our list of strategic materials which, up to some days ago, was more restrictive than that of Britain. But I certainly did not wish to imply that the British authorities were allowing "war materiel" to be carried to communist China.

Topic:   WAR MATERIALS
Subtopic:   MING SUNG INDUSTRIAL COMPANY
Sub-subtopic:   REFERENCE TO HEADING OF REPORT IN MONTREAL "GAZETTE"
Permalink

INQUIRY AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roseiown-Biggar):

should like to direct a question to the Prime Minister. Has he any information, other than that appearing in the press, about the negotiations for a cease-fire in Korea? Can he make any statement on it this morning?

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE
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LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I have no information additional to that which was published in the

press. It is a pretty complete statement of what is being done, and is such as to raise hopes in the minds of a great many that we may be on the eve of a cease-fire in Korea.

Topic:   INQUIRY AS TO NEGOTIATIONS FOR CEASE-FIRE
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INCOME TAX

INQUIRY AS TO ARRANGEMENTS FOR MAKING REFUNDS


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

should like to direct a question to the Minister of National Revenue. Since this is the last day of the session may I be permitted to preface my remarks, sir, with a few explanatory words?-because this is a matter that affects many thousands of people across the country. Beginning on Monday, deductions of income tax will be made at the source without regard to the proper allowances to which the taxpayer would be entitled. Will the department arrange, as soon as possible after proof has been given as to the proper deductions to which the taxpayer would be entitled, to make the necessary refund? Otherwise the labouring man and the salaried man will have paid far more income tax than they should, and the money to which they are entitled by way of refund will be held for a considerable time.

Topic:   INCOME TAX
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO ARRANGEMENTS FOR MAKING REFUNDS
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LIB

James Joseph McCann (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Hon. J. J. McCann (Minister of National Revenue):

On June 18, when discussing section 15 of the Income Tax Act, I made a statement on the withholding tax, and I should like to read the last paragraph of it, which I think on consideration is as fair and explicit an answer as I can make to the question which my hon. friend has asked, and of which he has given me notice. I said, as reported at page 4246 of Hansard:

Finally, I should add that in those cases where the incidence of intermittent employment, charitable donations, or unusual medical expenses, brings about over-deductions of tax, refunds can and will be made within a very short time after the taxpayer files his annual return. This year, for example, all district offices had processed refunds within two to four weeks after the receipt of the returns. If the taxpayer will file his return promptly, the department will see to it that he gets his cheque with all possible dispatch.

I admit that there has been some delay in some instances, perhaps, because the practice is that we have to match what are called T4 slips-that is, the slips that come from the employer, in which he indicates the

Inquiries of the Ministry amount of money that has been paid to the employee and the deductions that have been made.

If the taxpayer will make his return any time after January 1 for the year preceding, and we have the T4 returns from the employer, I will guarantee that refunds will be made very promptly, and following our practice that has been done within two to four weeks of the receipt of the return.

As I stated yesterday on the estimates, all, or practically all, the refunds for the year 1950 have been made as of the middle of June. That is a condition that has never before obtained in the department.

One of the causes of delay has been the complaint-I will admit this-by some employers that they did not have the T4 forms as early as they would have liked. That is one of the matters that we can attend to this year; I will see to it that they have them early in January, and refunds will be made with great promptness.

I might say to the hon. gentleman that there is the other side of it, too; there are cases in which the payment is not enough, where individuals have earned income from other sources than salary or wages, and the amount of earned income other than salary or wages last year was in excess of the combined medical bills and charitable donations. However, that has nothing to do with it. It is just to show that there is another side to the case. In these instances we have to make an extra collection of tax; but we will continue to see to it that refunds are made as promptly as it is possible to make them.

The taxpayer has a right, and is invited, to make his return early in the year. If he does that, and we have the matching T4 form, we shall be able to make his refund accordingly.

Topic:   INCOME TAX
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO ARRANGEMENTS FOR MAKING REFUNDS
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

I thank the minister for that assurance, because a number of labouring men have written me in regard to it.

Topic:   INCOME TAX
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO ARRANGEMENTS FOR MAKING REFUNDS
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MOVEMENT OUT OF STORAGE AND FROM HEAD OF LAKES


On the orders of the day:


PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. G. Diefenbaker (Lake Centre):

The

other day I asked a question of the Minister of Transport about the probability of being able to take out of the western provinces all the 1950 wheat crop before the 1951 season begins. The Department of Transport stated that that was a matter for the Minister of Trade and Commerce. I would now ask the Minister of Trade and Commerce whether he is in a position to give this information.

It is of importance to western farmers who have much wheat on hand.

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade

and Commerce): Yes, Mr. Speaker, the movement of western grain from the prairies to market has been the cause of great concern since the opening of navigation. As hon. members know, the crop was very late last year, and the movement of the crop before the close of navigation was only about 50 per cent of normal. The movement to date is not such as would indicate that this crop will be moved from western Canada by the time the next crop is marketed. There will certainly be a considerable amount of grain at the lakehead, and the best we can hope is that the country elevators will be cleared.

Extraordinary efforts have been made to obtain additional lake tonnage, which is the bottleneck at the moment. The fact of the matter is that lake tonnage is not sufficient to move the quantity of wheat which must be moved by this summer and, in addition, take care of the minimum requirements for iron ore and other products which must also be moved. A conference is being held today, which is one of several conferences, through which it is hoped to divert additional tonnage from other services. Every effort is being made to get the grain forward, but one unfortunate result has been we have had to stop selling No. 6 wheat and feed wheat for the very reason that we cannot make deliveries within any reasonable time on account of transportation problems. That, I think, is the situation. If my hon. friend has any other questions I should be glad to answer them.

Topic:   MOVEMENT OUT OF STORAGE AND FROM HEAD OF LAKES
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PC

John George Diefenbaker

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Diefenbaker:

Can the minister say

approximately what is the amount that will not be moved from the prairies? I am speaking particularly of the estimated amount in farm storage or in line elevators on the prairies. Then there is the other question arising out of the minister's statement. Approximately how much of the No. 6 wheat could be sold of which the wheat board has denied sale because transportation facilities are not available?

Topic:   MOVEMENT OUT OF STORAGE AND FROM HEAD OF LAKES
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

Up to June 21 the railroads had moved 415 million bushels of grain out of country elevators in the western division. As of the same date, a total of 108 million bushels of grain remains in country elevators, and the railways still continue to carry on a reasonably large movement of grain right up to the end of the crop year. Considering present stocks of grain in country elevators, and the volume of grain which producers will market during the remainder of the crop year, it is expected that some 80 to 90 million bushels

of grain will remain in country positions at the end of the crop year. Those are the essential figures.

Topic:   MOVEMENT OUT OF STORAGE AND FROM HEAD OF LAKES
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

Does the minister know the capacity of the country elevators?

Topic:   MOVEMENT OUT OF STORAGE AND FROM HEAD OF LAKES
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

I do not remember. I used to have those figures in my mind, but I think it is about 200 million bushels.

Topic:   MOVEMENT OUT OF STORAGE AND FROM HEAD OF LAKES
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June 30, 1951