May 21, 1951

PUBLIC BUILDINGS

PRINTING BUREAU-REFERENCE TO INFORMATION GIVEN IN SESSIONAL PAPERS

PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, on a question of

privilege affecting myself and other members of the house, I should like to point out that in sessional paper No. 107-D, dated May 17, 1951, which was tabled yesterday, I find the following question by the hon. member for Calgary East (Mr. Harkness) with the following answer by the government. This is the third question in that sessional paper, and it has reference to the site of the printing bureau in Hull. The question and answer follow:

Q. How much was paid for the site on which the building is being erected?

A. Estimated cost-$496,817.56.

On checking back I find that in sessional paper No. 107-B, dated March 27, 1950, the following question was asked by the hon. member for Victoria, Ont. (Mr. Hodgson), and the following answer was given by the government:

Q. What was the cost of the site of the proposed printing bureau in Hull, Quebec?

A. Cost of the site to date, $824,979.72.

It is quite evident that an explanation is due from the minister as to this discrepancy, in that the answer tabled yesterday indicates a figure more than $300,000 less than the figure given on March 27 last year as to the cost to date.

Topic:   PUBLIC BUILDINGS
Subtopic:   PRINTING BUREAU-REFERENCE TO INFORMATION GIVEN IN SESSIONAL PAPERS
Permalink
LIB

Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works; Leader of the Government in the House of Commons; Liberal Party House Leader)

Liberal

Hon. Alphonse Fournier (Minister of Public Works):

Mr. Speaker, there is no doubt that the figures in the two answers do not agree. I shall look into them. On listening to the hon. gentleman I was struck by the thought that in one case the officials probably were referring to the exact site on which the printing bureau is being built, while in the other case they were including other properties which were expropriated but which will not actually form part of the site. That may be the explanation, but I shall certainly have the facts when I give the answer.

Topic:   PUBLIC BUILDINGS
Subtopic:   PRINTING BUREAU-REFERENCE TO INFORMATION GIVEN IN SESSIONAL PAPERS
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VISITORS IN GALLERY

STUDENTS OF NORTH BAY NORMAL SCHOOL

LIB

John Richard Garland

Liberal

Mr. J. R. Garland (Nipissing):

Mr. Speaker, may I be permitted to refer to a group of eighty-five students who are now in the gallery to our left? These young people come from all parts of northern Ontario, as far west as the Manitoba border, as far north as Kapuskasing, as far northeast as Rouyn and Noranda, and as far south as Graven-hurst. They are students who attend the normal school in North Bay, and are now enjoying a two-day trip to the capital city. May I through you, sir, express the sincere hope that their visit to Ottawa, and particularly to the parliament buildings, will prove to be a pleasant and informative experience.

Topic:   VISITORS IN GALLERY
Subtopic:   STUDENTS OF NORTH BAY NORMAL SCHOOL
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REFERENCE TO REPORT IN THE "CANADIAN

TRIBUNE"

LIB

Daniel (Dan) McIvor

Liberal

Mr. Daniel Mclvor (Fori William):

Mr. Speaker, on a question of privilege, I regret very much to have to take a Toronto newspaper to task. I have always been taught that if a man hits you on one cheek you should turn the other, but when a newspaper hits you below the belt I think you have a right to stand up and fight. This paper accuses me of using my franking privilege to send out a pamphlet entitled, "Know Your Enemy." I absolutely deny that. Somebody must be using my frank in some illegitimate way, and therefore I say that that is hitting below the belt. They tell me that this pamphlet is anti-Semitic. If the Tribune condemns this pamphlet, then there must be some good in it. The pamphlet was just placed on my table; I looked at it only in a cursory way, but what I saw was good. It may be that I can find another issue of this pamphlet, because if it is as good as the first part then the world should know what the aim of this paper is.

I will not say any more on the matter. I will turn over the matter to the protective staff to find out who has been using my frank, and I will hand this paper to the Minister of Justice for future action.

Inquiries of the Ministry

Topic:   REFERENCE TO REPORT IN THE "CANADIAN
Subtopic:   TRIBUNE"
Sub-subtopic:   PAMPHLET "KNOW YOUR ENEMY"
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

May I say that I also

received this pamphlet, but my copy was in an envelope with no frank and no stamp. I am wondering how it got in my box. It is most objectionable.

Topic:   REFERENCE TO REPORT IN THE "CANADIAN
Subtopic:   TRIBUNE"
Sub-subtopic:   PAMPHLET "KNOW YOUR ENEMY"
Permalink

LENGTH AND MASS UNITS ACT

DEFINITION OF CANADIAN STANDARD YARD AND POUND

LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Defence Production; Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce) moved

for leave to introduce Bill No. 293, respecting units of length and mass.

Topic:   LENGTH AND MASS UNITS ACT
Subtopic:   DEFINITION OF CANADIAN STANDARD YARD AND POUND
Permalink
PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

Could we have an explanation?

Topic:   LENGTH AND MASS UNITS ACT
Subtopic:   DEFINITION OF CANADIAN STANDARD YARD AND POUND
Permalink
LIB

George James McIlraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Defence Production; Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. G. J. Mcllraith (Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, the Weights and Measures Act as passed in 1873 provided that a specified bronze bar would be the primary standard of length in Canada and a specified platinum-iridium weight would be the Canadian standard pound. With the progress of scientific metrology since 1873, it has been found that a more scientifically accurate primary standard can be defined in terms of the international metre. The bill now before the house for first reading therefore defines the primary standards of weight and measure in terms of the international metre and the international kilogram.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   LENGTH AND MASS UNITS ACT
Subtopic:   DEFINITION OF CANADIAN STANDARD YARD AND POUND
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EXTERNAL AFFAIRS


Mr. Rene N. Jutras (for Mr. Bradette) presented the first report of the standing committee on external affairs, and moved that the report be concurred in. Motion agreed to.


PARLIAMENT BUILDINGS

VISIT OF PRESIDENT OF FRANCE-SUGGESTED PLACING OF FLAGS IN MEMORIAL CHAMBER

May 21, 1951