April 5, 1951

LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Chevrier moved

the adjournment of the house.

He said: The business for tomorrow will be the consideration of item No. 5, a resolution concerning emergency gold mining assistance; a motion to go into committee of supply for discussion of the estimates of the Department of Transport and Department of Agriculture, but not necessarily in that order.

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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

No motion is necessary.

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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

Could we not know whether it is the intention to continue with one department during the remainder of the day or whether both departments are to be considered?

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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Chevrier:

I have not had an opportunity to discuss the matter with my colleague but if I could I should like to proceed tomorrow.

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PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Green:

Perhaps the minister could

ask the Minister of Agriculture now.

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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Chevrier:

I would rather leave it on

that basis, transport and agriculture, either one or the other, but not necessarily in that order.

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CCF

Stanley Howard Knowles (Whip of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation)

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Knowles:

Would it be possible for the various parties in the house to be informed tomorrow morning as to the order in which these departments will be called?

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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Mr. Chevrier:

Yes.

Motion agreed to and the house adjourned at 10.10 p.m.

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APPENDIX

ADDRESS


of HIS EXCELLENCY VINCENT AURIOL President of the French Republic to


MEMBERS OF THE SENATE AND OF THE HOUSE OF COMMONS AND THE GENERAL PUBLIC


in the House of Commons Chamber, Ottawa on Thursday, April 5, 1951 The President of the French Republic was welcomed by the Right Honourable L. S. St. Laurent, Prime Minister of Canada, and thanked by the Honourable Elie Beauregard, Speaker of the Senate, and the Honourable W. Ross Macdonald, Speaker of the House of Commons. (Translation):


LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. St. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. President, in the lives of

nations and of parliaments, as in the lives of men, there are significant and unforgettable moments. Your presence today, within this Canadian House of Commons, marks such an occasion in the life of our parliament and of our country as a whole.

(Text):

It is a great honour, Mr. President, to welcome you today in this House of Commons chamber on behalf of the members of both houses of the parliament of Canada. We are happy to be able at the same time to greet the charming first lady of France and the Foreign Minister of the French republic, His Excellency Mr. Robert Schuman. You may be assured, sir, that this assembly is fully representative of all the people of Canada in the warmth of our welcome.

(Translation):

This is the first time that we have had the honour of welcoming to our country the chief of the French government. We rejoice at your visit and we are happy also that you have made this a family occasion, as well as a political one, by bringing with you Madame Auriol, who so fittingly represents the 80709-106J

domestic virtues, the charm and elegance of your country. We are happy also that you have brought with you Monsieur Robert Schuman, your Minister of Foreign Affairs, one of the great architects of European unity. Please allow me to associate, in the welcome we are extending to you, the names of Madame Auriol and Monsieur Schuman.

I extend this welcome on behalf of all of the people of Canada; first of all, on behalf of those of my race and yours, Mr. President, most of whom live in the great St. Lawrence valley, a valley where our common ancestors, in the belief that they were establishing a colony, founded a nation. I welcome you also on behalf of all Canadians, who, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, now make up a people bound by common national aspirations. Our people are proud of the honour of your friendship, a friendship of which I received such moving tokens from you and the people of Paris, only a few weeks ago.

It is fitting that this welcome should be given you in our parliament chamber where the whole country is represented. It is here indeed that the unity of our people daily finds expression. Here, in 1914 and in 1939, legislation was passed that brought Canadian soldiers to the defence of an ideal which we felt was so eminently upheld by your country.

1664 HOUSE OF

The President of France Here, in 1949, was ratified the North Atlantic pact, which unites our two countries and ten others more intimately than ever before in time of peace. Here, measures are now being enacted that are considered necessary to deal with the new threat to our common civilization and heritage. Here, too, ways are being discussed to avoid a new conflict that neither France nor Canada is seeking but for which we mean to be ready if it should become unavoidable.

(Text):

You are visiting Canada, sir, at a difficult time in the history of our two countries-a difficult time in the life of free men all over the world. We had set high hopes on the United Nations organization as an instrument of peaceful co-operation among men and1 governments of good will; we still hope there are in the world enough men and women of good will to assure the ultimate triumph of those high purposes. Unfortunately, one of the great powers bent on extending the domination of its dictatorial masters has constantly worked to spread among its people, and among the peoples already under its domination, distrust, fear and unfriendliness toward their fellow men. This it is which has made it necessary for us to join together to build up our own military forces, not for aggressive purposes but to deter aggression by a firm demonstration of our capacity to overcome it if necessary.

You come to us, sir, after spending a few days in the United States of America. You cannot fail to have been impressed by the strength of that great country, and also by the sincerity of the peaceful aspirations of all its people. Here in Canada you will not fail to note the close, friendly relations which bind us to our southern neighbours, and also the untrammelled independence we enjoy in our own land. If our frontiers bordered on those of some grasping imperialistic neighbouring state, we might not have this opportunity of welcoming you in a free parliament as the distinguished and respected head of a free France. Canada is, I think, the best evidence, permanent and historic evidence, of the peaceful purposes of the United States.

These confident, friendly and co-operative international relations which we enjoy with our great southern neighbours we wish to share ultimately with the whole world, and in the meantime we expect to share them with all the nations of the north Atlantic community. We know we can count upon the people of France, and we wish to assure you the people of France can count upon the good will and effective co-operation of all the people of Canada.

(Translation) :

I know that you share our convictions as to the means of warding off the danger which threatens us. This means is none other than the pooling of our forces in the face of any possibility of aggression and of any attempted domination or even intimidation.

As I have just pointed out, our generation has twice already seen Canadian soldiers fight as brothers-in-arms with French soldiers. Thousands of them rest side by side in the vast cemeteries of France.

It was not only your homeland that our Canadian soldiers went to defend, it was also their own, their physical as well as their spiritual homeland. Similarly, your own soldiers fought for an ideal greater than the defence of French territory. Neither you nor we could watch with indifference the fate of the glorious heritage which they preserved for us at the cost of their lives. Without a doubt, we wish to do everything possible to prevent a new disaster from sweeping down on our peoples, but we shall never give up the right to defend ourselves; we shall never try to escape the duty of helping to defend those who, like yourselves, are more immediately exposed than we.

Upon your return home, you may tell your compatriots that here in Canada you have met men of good will, a people anxious not only to prevent the iron curtain from falling on the shores of the Atlantic, but eager to ensure that the tricolour shall ever wave in the air of freedom, because the Canadian people realize that the free world would no longer be free if ever France or the Europe from which our ancestors came should lose their freedom.

Ladies and gentlemen, Monsieur Vincent Auriol, President of the French republic.

His Excellency Vincent Auriol (President of the French republic): Mr. Prime Minister, Mr. Speaker of -the Senate, Mr. Speaker of the House of Commons, gentlemen: My heart is deeply touched with emotion and pride.

I realize the full significance for France of the warmth of your greetings, the acclamations of your people, the supreme honour you have done us in officially welcoming us in the imposing edifice of your parliament, and, finally, of the eloquence of the words just spoken.

I am fully aware of the value of this symbol: the President of the French republic bringing to Canada the affectionate message

of France on this very hill at the boundary of the provinces of Ontario and Quebec, the meeting place of forces, young and eager, English and French, the union of which has created your nation, which increases in strength and grandeur every day and constitutes an immense human treasure for the future.

Sons of the British isles, sons of France, what a magnificent example is given to the world, what a long path travelled together!

Great Britain and France-how long we struggled and fought! But in those hard and often long battles there never appeared the slightest divergence in our conceptions of life, in our forms of civilization. The reconciliation has been complete, and together we may admire today this vigorous Canadian nation which is the expression, diversified but united, of the genius of the two races.

The meeting of our spirits has begotten your spirit. And this spirit, illuminated with idealism, guides you toward a magnificent future. The two ancient peoples, their rivalries forgotten, are proud to recognize something of themselves in your common fidelity, and to find themselves rejuvenated and more closely united by your extraordinary ascent. They are moved to see Montaigne and Shakespeare preside over your debates in common respect for human dignity and common love of liberty.

Mr. Speaker of the Senate, I beg you to accept, as a Canadian of French origin, the message of friendship I am bringing to the faithful guardians of the French language and culture. They prove that in a solid national unity like yours you nevertheless cherish, as we do in France, the memory of your origins, and you perpetuate the Christian and human civilization that France was the first to bring to you. Your history, as a matter of fact, is in some ways our history. As Maurice Barres has described it, "You have, as we did in France, reached the highway through bypaths, and you remain assembled beneath your banners". And those banners are always worthy of your love.

It is to you, Mr. Speaker of the House of Commons, that I address my message of friendship for the English-speaking Canadians, whose origin reminds us that Great Britain, also defender of the right, knew how to "beget consciences" and carry the flag of honour everywhere. A few months ago the world mourned the loss of a great Canadian statesman and a great democrat who, even in the darkest days, always affirmed his faith in the destiny of France. I pay respectful homage to the memory of William Lyon

The President of France Mackenzie King, one of the principal artisans of the common victory of the allies. As our poet Rutebeuf has said, "He was not one of those friends that the wind carries away when it howls around the door".

I greet also the Prime Minister, whose visit to Paris permitted us to admire his fine spirit and generous heart. I greet his colleagues of the government, and also, if you will permit it to an old opponent, the parliamentary opposition.

And now, gentlemen, I take this occasion to tell you that at this very hour the whole of France joins with you and with me in paying homage to the sacred memory of thousands of Canadians who, in the course of two world wars, fought and fell for the liberty of the world; and to their families and to their surviving comrades I bring our affectionate greetings and grateful sympathy.

At Vimy, where a memorial reminds us of their legendary heroism, at Tilloy, at Dieppe, at Bretteville-sur-Laize, at Beny-sur-Mer and in so many other places which speak of their courage, France, whose heart beat faster when she saw them parade through her towns, now tenderly watches over their eternal rest.

Finally, to the people of Canada I express the enduring friendship of France, our gratitude for all they have done for our liberation, and also for that inexhaustible generosity which, under the impetus of national and private organizations, has been lavish in its help to relieve the misery of our people exhausted by war and a long and awful oppression.

In this world which becomes every day smaller and smaller, and where the interdependence of nations is a fact, you have understood that our destinies are just the same, and that there are not for man, whether in the midst of storm or the calm of peace, several conceptions of virtue and honour.

Of this vital solidarity I never heard a more concise definition than that which I heard on the radio in a small mountain chalet where I had taken refuge after my confinement in prison, when I fled from the oppressor before my departure for London. "World prosperity, like security, is indivisible". They were the words of Mackenzie King. They must always be our common motto.

France, being the first country on the road of invasions and battles, knows perhaps better than anyone that security is indivisible. If

The President of France she had remained alone during the war she would have definitely succumbed. And with France enslaved, all Europe would have lost everything, even hope. If our old civilization were to disappear from Europe some day, what would become of the rest of the continents of the world in the face of an erupting Asia?

No nation, therefore, has the right to leave "to chance the smallest parcel of its security, its dignity or pride." Every nation has the duty to preserve the liberty of man against all those who would or could attempt, from their own autocratic will, to impose their fanatical ideology and thus unleash the most frightful of wars. Canada has understood this; for twice she has already given men, material and resources, an enormous and sacrificial contribution, to the victory of right and liberty.

Thus your determination has foiled the efforts of an enemy who hoped that, being far from Europe, you would not take any part in the conflict.

Certainly Great Britain could rely on your traditional loyalty, honour and courage. Certainly France could say she knew you were faithful to the motto of Quebec, "Je me souviens".

But the real truth is that the highest ideal inspired your action. You knew that liberty has no frontiers; that if anywhere in the world the light is extinguished, then the rest of the world is darker. You want to sustain the light and preserve for the nations the proud right to live in freedom and to flourish.

Thus you encounter France, because she has already experienced1 the horrors of war on her own soil, the sorrow of ruins because she knows what it is to endure, though temporarily, the oppression of foreign enslavement; because she experienced the mortal peril of solitude in the face of aggression she thought, like you, that our forces must be united in proper time for the founding of peace. With you, with Great Britain, with the United States, we had hoped that the charter of the United Nations, signed by all, would assure the protection of every nation by the organization of collective security, as well as the happiness of mankind by the co-operation of nations.

But the spirit of intolerance and the will to dominate has not permitted the materialization of this great hope. And the United Nations, partially paralysed, have not been

able to save countries from losing their independence again or men their liberty. Once again, one after another as before the last war, the free democracies have been smothered. Vast countries are closed and hostile to the rest of the world. Violence has reappeared and menaces; it even strikes. And so the great democracies enjoying civil liberties had to organize into regional defence pacts. It was with great relief that we greeted the conclusion of the pact among the north Atlantic countries, due in great part to the clairvoyant initiative of Canadian statesmen-this pact which, ratified by the unanimous vote of your parliament, has established a powerful bond between Europe and America, a bond among the peoples united by the same civilization and by the same desire and anxiety to protect and defend it.

If the aggressors of 1914 and 1939 had known that France was not alone, that Europe was not alone, they would have retreated from the criminal folly of their enterprise. History is the witness: solidarity in defence is a token of peace.

France wants neither war nor servitude. Her sole aim is peace in justice and freedom.

It is for common defence, but also for common prosperity, that France strives to create a united Europe, to build a young and coherent federation.

In the military field, a European army that will be integrated into the Atlantic bloc is the first link of collective security.

In the economic and social field, the free association of productive forces, of which the Schuman plan is the first step, has to organize collective prosperity.

Eventually, in the political field, the European council of ministers and the assembly of Strasbourg is the beginning of federal unity to which we wish to give strength and efficiency.

For the success of this great design we have silenced our resentments toward the enemy of yesterday, who nevertheless was responsible for the death by torture of the best of our citizens. Our only condition has been and remains that he shall not forget his crimes, and faults; that he shall renounce plans of domination and revenge; that he shall sincerely rally to the principles of democracy.

And so we want a democratic Europe, created not through the subordination of some nations to another, but through a fruitful harmony. And this free Europe, open to

all the peoples who respect the liberty of others, will associate itself with the new world so that upon this international economic and political co-operation may be built enduring peace.

Whatever it may cost us, the victory of peace is the prize.

Let us not miss any possibility of agreement, even partial, and no occasion to dissipate misunderstandings; but so long as the United Nations have not the necessary armed forces to maintain international order, we must neglect nothing in the organization of our common regional defence.

Let us not cease to proclaim the right and the principles of an enduring peace, but let us judge the sincerity of our partners by their acts and by their actual contribution to the easing of international tension.

France is not giving herself up to any naive neutralism, and whatever sacrifices our rearmament efforts add to our already crushing burdens for rehabilitation and re-equipment, we know that no sacrifice is as heavy as that of liberty.

There is no better testimony of our resolution than the heroism of our soldiers who are fighting in Korea in the service of the United Nations, and for more than four years have been fighting in Indo-China, where it is now recognized, after much injustice, that they defend no selfish interest but the independence that France has given to the young states of Viet Nam, Cambodia and Laos. They mount guard at the gates of southeast Asia.

France is thus faithful to her traditions and the ideal of our common civilization.

Momentarily exhausted by the wounds she received while the world was unorganized, she always knows that it is in the exaltation of the spirit that great things-the proud cathedrals and lofty monuments of right- are wrought.

With Great Britain, Canada and the United States, and the free world, France shares a common faith. And the visit of the President of the French republic to your country is not only the manifestation of the enduring affection of France, but the expression of our will to work together to achieve greater liberty, greater justice and greater fraternity.

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LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Hon. Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate):

Mr. President of the Republic, the

Canadian Senate joins with the Prime

The President of France Minister in greeting you as the first citizen of France and in wishing you a most cordial welcome.

To your visit among us we owe the honour to pay our respects to Madame Auriol and the pleasure to renew acquaintance with some of the best builders of the alliance of nations and of world peace.

Even before your arrival we had heard of the message you bring to America, a message of co-operation and of solidarity. It will help strengthen the feeling of true democracy that Canada has inherited from its two mother countries.

The position of our country-a country in some respects so new-its abundant natural resources and its life ideals have caused it to occupy in the council of nations a place formerly held by nations of greater population.

Canada enters the scene at a time when western democracies must, more than ever before, maintain a social order mindful of the true scale of values, where money serves production, where production serves humanity and humanity itself serves an ideal that gives life its true meaning.

That objective has always been pursued by the civilizing power that is France. Today, the French people, who have witnessed, within thirty years, two invasions, two victories and, need I add, two post-war periods, remain the unconquered champions of human freedom. Not only have the French people fought alone for several years against Asiatic communism, but they remain the cornerstone of the fortress which western democracies must build in Europe.

Four million Canadians share with the French people an inalienable heritage based on a glorious past and a culture of universal significance. One of your historians was thinking of that past and culture when he said that England is an empire, Germany a country, and France a lady. May I be permitted to offer to that lady, the mother of letters, arts and arms, the tribute of our attachment and of our admiration.

(Text):

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LIB

William Ross Macdonald (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Hon. W. Ross Macdonald (Speaker of the House of Commons):

Mr. President, the

Speaker of the Senate has expressed to you in the beautiful French language our appreciation of your eloquent and inspiring address. May I add an expression of appreciation in the English language. Canada is a bilingual country, and whether we speak in French or in English we speak the language of Canada.

The President of France

Canada over the years has been honoured by visits by the heads of state of several great countries, but never in its history by the President of France. Canada was discovered by a Frenchman in 1534. Our existence, therefore, has been known for 417 years, and although it could hardly be said that we have waited all those years for this visit, nevertheless I can assure you, Mr. President, that the warmth of our welcome is in direct ratio with the warmth of the 417 summers of our existence.

As we listened to your address this afternoon we recalled that when we go back to the birth of our nation we go back to France. It is interesting to note that when the first Frenchman arrived in Canada he sailed up those great waters which were to be known as the St. Lawrence or St. Laurent, and that when the first president of France to visit Canada arrived in our country he was greeted by a great prime minister bearing the same name, St. Laurent.

It was Jacques Cartier, a Frenchman from St. Malo, who first set foot in Canada and carried the cross and the fleur-de-lis to the island of Hochelaga. It was another Frenchman, Champlain, who established the first

colony in Canada and founded the city of Quebec. It was a French Jesuit priest, Marquette, who first sailed in a frail canoe through the treacherous waters which led to the great lakes and on to the Mississippi. It was French civilization which was first implanted in Canada. Since that time we have added the customs, the traditions, the language and the literature of the British, and, in more recent years, of many other countries. In 417 years we have grown from a trading post, to a colony, to a nation. The progress which we have made would not have been possible had we not been blessed with peace. Throughout our history we have never had an extensive war within our boundaries. Geography, partly, has made that possible for us. We trust that in the future the good sense and the unselfish spirit of mankind will make that possible for France.

On behalf of the members of the House of Commons of Canada I would ask you to extend greetings to the members of the national assembly of France, and to assure them that your visit has made even stronger the ties which bind Canada and France together as friendly peace-loving nations. Vive la France! Vive le Canada! Vive le Roi! Vive le President!

Friday, April 6, 1951

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April 5, 1951