March 13, 1951

RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES


Third report of standing committee on railways, canals and telegraph lines.-Mr. McCulloch.



RECROSSING OF 38th PARALLEL BY UNITED NATIONS TROOPS On the orders of the day:


CCF

Angus MacInnis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Angus Maclnnis (Vancouver East):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Secretary of State for External Affairs. It is based on a news item appearing in yesterday's Ottawa Journal. If you will allow me, I should like to summarize it very briefly. Its purport is that General Matthew B. Ridgway said yesterday that it would be a tremendous victory for the United Nations if the Korean war should end at the 38th parallel, but he knows of no plan for hostilities to end there. I should like to ask the Secretary of State for External Affairs if the Canadian government has discussed this matter of the United Nations forces again crossing the 38th parallel, and if it has, will he make a statement to the house?

Topic:   RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, questions were asked of the government on the second and thirteenth of February, by the hon. member for Rosetown-Biggar (Mr. Coldwell), on the subject of crossing the 38th parallel. There is nothing that I can usefully add at this time to what I said then.

Topic:   RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES
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PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Graydon:

May I suggest to the minister that the question that might well be asked is this: Why are the Chinese Reds south of the 38th parallel?

Topic:   RAILWAYS, CANALS AND TELEGRAPH LINES
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STATEMENT AS TO RECENT IMPORTATIONS AND BASIS OF DISTRIBUTION


On the orders of the day:


LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture):

Before the orders of the day are proceeded with I should like to answer a question asked yesterday by the hon. member for Souris (Mr. Ross),, as to how much butter has been imported into Canada recently, and

by whom; the basis of the distribution of government stocks of butter, and what is the present situation with respect to butter.

Approximately 4,800,000 pounds of butter have been imported into Canada, and the Department of Agriculture has made arrangements with the importers or the first buyer for its distribution. The importations were made by Olive and Dorion, Montreal; Lovell and Christmas, Montreal; A. A. Ayre Company, Montreal; Canada Packers Limited, Toronto, and Eastern Townships Produce Company, Sherbrooke. The government has now allocated the remaining stocks held by the dairy products board for distribution over the next two weeks.

Government stocks were released to the trade across Canada in original carlots, basis 57 cents per pound, Montreal, for first grade creamery butter, upon application from dealers setting forth their stock position in relation to their requirements. Sales have been confined throughout the period to those dealers who had less than two weeks' supply of butter in sight.

Stocks of butter in storage as at March 1, 1951, were 14,900,000 pounds. The production of butter during March, 1950, was 12,500,000 pounds, and it is expected that the amount will be similar this year.

Topic:   STATEMENT AS TO RECENT IMPORTATIONS AND BASIS OF DISTRIBUTION
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PC

Edmund Davie Fulton

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Fulton:

If I may ask a question in relation to the statement just made, having particular reference to the stocks of board butter which the minister says are now being released, may these stocks be sold in any province, or are they confined to certain provinces?

Topic:   STATEMENT AS TO RECENT IMPORTATIONS AND BASIS OF DISTRIBUTION
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. Gardiner:

They may be sold in any province, but there are some provinces to which stocks are not being moved at the present time, particularly the prairie provinces.

Topic:   STATEMENT AS TO RECENT IMPORTATIONS AND BASIS OF DISTRIBUTION
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TRANSPORTATION

INQUIRY AS TO REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Percy Ellis Wright

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. P. E. Wright (Melfort):

Can the

Minister of Transport say whether we shall have the printed report of the royal commission on transportation in our hands before Easter?

Topic:   TRANSPORTATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION
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LIB

Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport)

Liberal

Hon. Lionel Chevrier (Minister of Transport):

The last information I had with respect

1186 HOUSE OF

Inquiries of the Ministry to the Turgeon report on transportation was that it is likely to be ready for tabling some time this week.

Topic:   TRANSPORTATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO REPORT OF ROYAL COMMISSION
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PARLIAMENT HILL

REFERENCE TO CONDITION OF ADJOINING STREETS


On the orders of the day:


PC

Julian Harcourt Ferguson

Progressive Conservative

Mr. J. H. Ferguson (Simcoe North):

Can

the Minister of Public Works say whether his department or the city of Ottawa is responsible for the filthy, sandy condition of the streets in front of these buildings, which has existed for two or three weeks?

Topic:   PARLIAMENT HILL
Subtopic:   REFERENCE TO CONDITION OF ADJOINING STREETS
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March 13, 1951