February 2, 1951

PRIME MINISTER OF FRANCE


VISIT OF MR. RENfi PLEVEN AND HIS PARTY TO THE HOUSE OF COMMONS


LIB

Louis Stephen St-Laurent (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council)

Liberal

Right Hon. L. S. Si. Laurent (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, amongst the first to follow upon your instructions of a moment ago, that the doors of the gallery be opened, we see His Excellency Monsieur Rene Pleven, president of the council of ministers of the French republic, and those who accompany him on a visit which does us honour, Their Excellencies ambassadors Parodi, Alphand and Guerin, the latter of whom is now in Canada, and Miss Sicard.

All our colleagues, I am sure, will wish to extend to them their most heartfelt greetings and to thank them for showing by their presence here the sincerity of the co-operation between European countries and those of North America in our common undertaking to build up a military force of sufficient strength, based on sound national economies, on economies so closely bound as to deter any aggressor.

(Text):

Mr. Rene Pleven, in common with many of us here, Mr. Speaker, boasts of an ancestry whose roots go deep in the soil of Brittany. He has all the qualities and qualifications which we value so highly, among them that of being perfectly bilingual. He is fluent in the two languages which are official in this house. I know from my own privileged experience in relations with them that those who are with him on this occasion are also bilingual. That can only add to the warmth of the welcome we extend to them on this occasion, because it will enable us to feel that, in whichever language the proceedings of our house are conducted in their presence, they will appreciate that our problems and our concerns are the same as theirs, and are the same as those of free men and women all over the world. Our own hopes for world peace are based1 on the prompt co-operative action of all of us, and the visit with which we are honoured at this time is concrete evidence that that action is being vigorously undertaken.

Topic:   PRIME MINISTER OF FRANCE
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PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of ihe Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, it is a great honour to join with the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) in extending a most cordial welcome to the representative of a nation which is bound to Canada by so many ties of blood and affection. As the Prime Minister has pointed out already, it is perhaps a symbol of that understanding which means so much to all of us that Mr. Pleven comes from that part of France which gave to this country so many of its early settlers.

In joining in this welcome to Premier Pleven may I say also that there are reasons why thoughts of France are at all times in the hearts of the Canadian people. It is because in hundreds of thousands of Canadian minds there is always the memory that there is some part of France that is forever Canada. To all the friends and relatives of nearly 100,000 young Canadians who gave their lives in the common cause of freedom in two world wars, French soil is sacred soil, and the efforts of France to join with us and with the other free nations in preserving that freedom means not only the preservation of the proud soil of France, and all that it means to the people of France, but also, for us, the preservation of those bits of soil throughout that country which are so dear to many of us in Canada.

Mr. Pleven is a young man whom we welcome here not for the first time. We welcome him once again because at this time when there is the utmost understanding between France, Great Britain and Canada-in so many ways bound more closely together by ties of blood than any other nations-it is of maximum importance that in his high office as premier of France he should have a background of years of work in Canada and in Great Britain which gives to him a personal and working knowledge of the lives of the people of those countries, of their own problems, and also of their great strength and stability. Every one of us, not only here but throughout Canada, wishes him well in his high endeavours in this common cause, and we all trust that out of this time of peril and uncertainty France will carry forward into the years ahead her inspired traditions of freedom, industry and culture.

Inquiries of the Ministry MINES AND TECHNICAL SURVEYS

Topic:   PRIME MINISTER OF FRANCE
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SURVEYS OF IRON ORE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Arthur Laing

Liberal

Mr. Arthur Laing (Vancouver South):

should like to address a question to the Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys. Will he make a statement at this time with regard to the proposals of his department dealing with surveys of iron ore in the province of British Columbia? I make this request because of a statement heard on a C.B.C. station last night concerning export.

Topic:   SURVEYS OF IRON ORE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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LIB

George Prudham (Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys)

Liberal

Hon. George Prudham (Minister of Mines and Technical Surveys):

Mr. Speaker, the hon. member for Vancouver South was kind enough to give me a few minutes' notice of his question, but I was not able to secure complete information. With your permission, sir, I should like to bring in a complete report at the next sitting of the house.

Topic:   SURVEYS OF IRON ORE IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
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REPORTED DECISION THAT UNITED NATIONS FORCES SHOULD STOP AT 38TH PARALLEL


On the orders of the day:


CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Rosetown-Biggar):

should like to address a question to the Secretary of State for External Affairs. Will the minister indicate whether the report is correct that United States officials have decided that United Nations troops should stop at the 38th parallel? Is this not a decision which should be made by the general assembly of the United Nations?

Topic:   REPORTED DECISION THAT UNITED NATIONS FORCES SHOULD STOP AT 38TH PARALLEL
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LIB

Lester Bowles Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. L. B. Pearson (Secretary of State for External Affairs):

The hon. member was kind enough to give me some notice of this question, which presumably refers to press reports in this morning's newspapers. I am not in a position to confirm the accuracy or otherwise of that report. The government has received no information, official or otherwise, concerning it.

As to the second question, Mr. Speaker, it is of course a hypothetical one. Under the circumstances which the hon. member contemplates, I would think it would be proper for the question to be discussed in the United Nations. The unified command is, of course, not precluded from deciding to hold the advance of the United Nations forces at any point which it deems advisable.

Topic:   REPORTED DECISION THAT UNITED NATIONS FORCES SHOULD STOP AT 38TH PARALLEL
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ARRANGEMENTS MADE BY INDIA FOR SUPPLIES FROM CANADA


On the orders of the day:


PC

A. Earl Catherwood

Progressive Conservative

Mr. A. Earl Caiherwood (Haldimand):

I

should like to direct a question to the

Minister of Trade and Commerce. Has the government of India made representations concerning the urgent need of that country for wheat? If so, to what extent have such requests been carried out?

Topic:   ARRANGEMENTS MADE BY INDIA FOR SUPPLIES FROM CANADA
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

The government of India

has not made formal representations to the Canadian government, but has made

arrangements with the Canadian wheat board for supplies of wheat. The Canadian wheat board has contracted to supply the government of India with 300,000 long tons of wheat, which is now in process of being shipped in accordance with the terms of the contract. Discussions have taken place

within recent days between representatives of the government of India and the Canadian wheat board with regard to the supplying of some further quantities.

I may say that the quantities of wheat that are now available for sale are limited to grades that are not considered to be milling grades; that is, they are No. 5, No. 6, and feed wheat. Discussions are now in process to ascertain whether India can use any of these grades of wheat.

Topic:   ARRANGEMENTS MADE BY INDIA FOR SUPPLIES FROM CANADA
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PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Graydon:

Is this part of the commonwealth plan in which Canada is participating, or is it a collateral transaction between Canada and India?

Topic:   ARRANGEMENTS MADE BY INDIA FOR SUPPLIES FROM CANADA
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LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. Howe:

Sales have been made directly between Canada and India under the international wheat agreement to which we are both parties.

Topic:   ARRANGEMENTS MADE BY INDIA FOR SUPPLIES FROM CANADA
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REFERENCE TO "VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS" OF THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

It has been brought to my attention by the hon. member for Cape Breton North and Victoria (Mr. MacLean) that on page 17 of yesterday's Votes and Proceedings it is recorded that Mr. MacLean (Cape Breton North and Victoria) seconded the motion of Mr. MacDougall for leave to introduce a bill to amend the Dominion Day Act and the Victoria Day Act. That is a mistake. The motion was seconded by the hon. member for Huron-Perth (Mr. McLean). I can assure the hon. member for Cape Breton North and Victoria that the record will be corrected accordingly.

Topic:   REFERENCE TO "VOTES AND PROCEEDINGS" OF THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1
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February 2, 1951