May 29, 1950

VISIT TO BROCKVILLE AND DISTRICT BY MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT

LIB

William F. Carroll

Liberal

Mr. W. F. Carroll (Inverness-Richmond):

On a question of privilege, Mr. Speaker, it seems right and proper that the House of Commons and the public should be informed of the fact that the leading intellectuals of all political parties in the house spent the week end at Brockville in the county of Leeds, and in other parts of the province of Ontario. Speaking for myself and others, our visit was a great pleasure from every point of view. We enjoyed all the social functions, and gained firsthand knowledge of one of the beauty spots of Ontario. We visited the truly magnificent Thousand islands, the imposing, comfortable and beautiful tourist resorts of the county, and the industries of Brockville, the principal town.

What caught my attention and imagination was the complete cleanliness of the industrial plants, the beauty and tidiness of the outer surroundings, and the spirit of harmony prevailing between employer and employee. The tidy workshops of industry in the town of Brockville were very different from the dirty and miserable places in other large industrial centres of this country where people must toil day and night.

Our thanks and appreciation must go to the genial member for Leeds (Mr. Fulford). He is not here today, because he is attending the graduation of one of his sons from McGill university. I should also like to express our thanks and appreciation to his most amiable wife, to the mayor and aldermen of the civic corporations of Brockville and Gananoque, and the members of the chambers of commerce, for a wonderful time and an educational feast.

I hope and pray that in the future there will be more such visits from the east of Canada to the centre, from the west to the centre, and from the centre to the east and west, in order that members of the house may obtain firsthand knowledge of the wonderful country in which we are privileged to live.

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PC

Joseph Henry Harris

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Harris (Danforth):

Before the hon. member sits down, will he explain to the house what a leading intellectual is?

Topic:   VISIT TO BROCKVILLE AND DISTRICT BY MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
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LIB

George Alexander Cruickshank

Liberal

Mr. Cruickshank:

There are none over on that side.

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SC

William Duncan McKay Wylie

Social Credit

Mr. W. D. Wylie (Medicine Hal):

Mr. Speaker, following the remarks of the hon. member for Inverness-Richmond (Mr. Carroll), may I say that I was most happy to hear what the hon. member had to say about our visit to Brockville. I should like to express my sincere appreciation to the hon. member for Leeds (Mr. Fulford) for organizing the trip. I want to express my appreciation also to the city of Brockville, the town of Gananoque and their chambers of commerce, for their part in organizing the visit.

I should also like to refer to a telegram that has been on the bulletin board of the House of Commons since noon yesterday. It reads:

Alexandria Bay, N.Y.

May 27, 1950

George T. Fulford, M.P.,

House of Commons

The "Wylie for president" campaign has got off to an enthusiastic start. There is much room today for purity in politics.

W. Hornblower, chairman.

The telegram demonstrates that when members of the Liberal, Conservative, C.C.F. and Social Credit groups get together on such a trip, we can do things.

Before I resume my seat may I say that the trip through the Thousand islands was very much appreciated; it was something I shall always remember. On behalf of those associated with me in this group may I say to those who were so thoughtful as to arrange for this trip, thanks a million.

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CCF

Clarence Gillis

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Clarence Gillis (Cape Breton South):

Mr. Speaker, speaking for the other representative of the proletariat who was with me, as well as for myself, I agree with What has been said by both hon. members who have spoken. We are very much indebted to the hon. member for Leeds (Mr. Fulford) and those associated with him in arranging this informative and interesting week end of recreation.

The trip also had international implications. We visited Alexandria Bay, New York, and were treated very kindly by the people of that area. You will notice that my vociferous friend from Alberta made such an impression over there that they are considering running him for president of the United States.

Rimouski and Cabano Fires

We had a very pleasant week end, and are greatly indebted to those who were responsible for it.

(Translation):

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RIMOUSKI AND CABANO-VISIT BY PRIME MINISTER SCOPE OF DEVASTATION


Right Hon. L. S. Si. Laurent (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, with your permission, I should like to report briefly to the house on what I have been able to observe in the course of the trip I made last Thursday and Friday to Rimouski and Cabano, where I visited the victims of the disasters which occurred in those two cities of the lower St. Lawrence. I left Dorval Thursday morning with the Solicitor General (Mr. Lapointe), and Mr. Leopold Langlois, member for Gaspe, who acted as representative for the hon. member for Rimouski, Mr. Gleason Belzile. Brigadier Jean Allard, commanding officer of the Quebec military district, joined our party in Quebec city. Perfect weather and visibility permitted us to have an aerial view of the damaged sections of the towns of Cabano and Rimouski, before we landed for our visit to these two interesting industrial centres. After landing at Mont Joli airport, we were met by Brigadier A. Theriault, member of the federal-provincial commission which is to report on both disasters, and then our party proceeded immediately by motorcar to Rimouski. We paid our first call to the city hall, where we were greeted by Mayor Victor Lepage. We met the members of the municipal council, the members of the relief committee, the civic department heads, the engineers, architects and technicians, all of whom were there on loan from the federal and provincial governments. We were shown the properties which were destroyed on the cadastral survey of the city. The plan would be to try to rebuild the district which was burned down by making a new cadastral survey which would take into account the views of the owners, engineers, surveyors and town-planners who are all working in very close co-operation. One can easily imagine the difficulty of the problem when one knows that the damaged area does not allow all previous owners to rebuild their homes if they are to be separated by sufficient space to prevent another disaster. From the city hall, we went to visit the damaged area, where we met the superior of the seminary. As you know, half of the building, not being fireproof, was burned down. Then we met the nuns in charge of the hospital where extension works had been in progress. Unfortunately even in the fireproof section, flames spread through and caused damage. There we also saw the nuns in charge of the home for the aged and of the orphanage, both of which have disappeared; we also met the manager of the Price Company, whose mill was destroyed. At this time of the year, the mill employed between 500 to 600 men. Although the company's plans for the future are not yet determined, it is held that it will shortly be able to provide work for a good many workers. We have seen the ruins of 359 houses, the destruction of which has left over 2,000 persons homeless. Approximately one-quarter of the town has disappeared in this terrible fire, not to mention the vast area covered by the plant and lumber yards of the Price Company. The canteen set up in the arena by the relief committee has operated very well and it still serves between 1,200 to 1,500 meals a day. In the committee's warehouses, we have been able to see great quantities of clothing, furniture, building material and goods of all sorts which were sent to the victims by sympathetic and generous people in Canada and the United States. Toward the end of the afternoon, we called on the Archbishop of Rimouski, who expressed his gratitude for the sympathy shown to the population of his episcopal See. Friday, we went to Cabano with the hon. member for Temiscouata, Mr. Jean Francois Pouliot. In that town, we were greeted by Mayor Emilien Morin and Rev. Canon Cyr, parish priest. One hundred and fifty-nine homes were destroyed in Cabano, which left over 1,000 persons homeless. In Rimouski every victim took refuge elsewhere in the city and in surrounding villages; but it could not be so in Cabano, where close to a third of the village was destroyed and many of the victims still live under tents supplied by the army or other divisions of the dominion and provincial governments. In Cabano, as well as in Rimouski, the army and Red Cross have performed an admirable task, and nothing was spared to save the victims from hunger and want. The population of both localities is courageous and optimistic. The sympathy and help which they have received are appreciated. In both towns there are clever and enterprising administrators and businessmen who show a great deal of initiative. In Cabano, the manager of the Fraser Company, whose plant has not been destroyed, assured us that normal operations would be resumed this very morning. I have conveyed to every one the sympathy of the people of Canada and in both places I stated, as I had done in this very house, that upon receipt of the report concerning the nature and extent of each of the two disasters the federal government would take a similar stand with respect to assistance as was taken in the case of the Fraser valley disaster in 1948. The members of the commission of inquiry into the disasters at Rimouski and Cabano are proceeding with diligence and the government has reason to believe that they will report on the results of their investigation in the near future.


PC

Charles Delmar Coyle

Progressive Conservative

Mr. A. Phileas Cole (Malapedia-Maiane):

Mr. Speaker, following the remarks of the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent), I wish to assure him and the government that the good people of my constituency, which adjoins Rimouski, scene of the terrible catastrophe, are entirely at the officials' disposal in order to help cope with this disastrous problem. The Matane civic authorities have already taken the necessary steps to have the home for the aged in that city replace that of Rimouski. The old Matane hospital has been furnished and will be turned over to the nuns whose own building was lost at Rimouski; this hospital, which is quite suitable, will be used to hospitalize the inmates of the home for the aged in Rimouski.

Many of the Rimouski fire victims have already taken refuge in the constituency of Matapedia-Matane. I am also sure that at Lac au Saumon and at Amqui, people are willing to do all that is humanly possible in order to relieve the hardship suffered by the citizens of Rimouski. Government officials are doubtless aware of the efforts that have already been made in this direction and they also realize that the good people of Matane are very anxious to help the fire victims of Rimouski, if only they are given the opportunity to do so.

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LIB

J. G. Léopold Langlois

Liberal

Mr. J. G. L. Langlois (Gaspe):

Mr. Speaker, at the request of my hon. friend from

Rimouski and Cabano Fires Rimouski (Mr. Belzile), who is at present confined to the hospital, I was indeed happy to represent him at Rimouski while accompanying the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) and the Solicitor General (Mr. Lapointe) on a tour of that stricken area. If I speak today on behalf of my colleague as well as of the people of the constituency of Rimouski, it is to thank publicly the right hon. the Prime Minister and the Solicitor General for this visit, which was as much a token of sympathy as a means of investigation. My fellow citizens of the fire-ravaged town of Rimouski will most certainly have found in this evidence of interest and sympathy on the part of the government a most valuable incentive in the heavy task of reconstruction which now faces them as a result of this disaster.

I know also that the people of Rimouski were deeply moved by the visit paid them yesterday by Their Excellencies the Governor General and Lady Alexander. I am also certain that this expression of sympathy on the part of His Majesty's representative in Canada has been greatly appreciated by these sadly afflicted people.

I also wish to thank the hon. member for Matapedia-Matane (Mr. Cote), as well as his fellow citizens and constituents, for the generous support and valuable help they gave to the people of Rimouski during and since that disaster.

(Text):

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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 238, for the relief of Katherine Madge Samworth Monty.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 239, for the relief of Clara Rosen Freedman.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 240, for the relief of Frances Berman Mellor, otherwise known as Sharie Sinclaire.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 241, for the relief of Rodolphe Durand.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 242, for the relief of Helen Leek Karaszi.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 243, for the relief of Sadie Chernin Petruska, otherwise known as Sadie Chernin Prince.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 244, for the relief of Audrey Phyllis Angela Blom Rochfort.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 245, for the relief of Patricia Ruth Segall Wener.-Mr. Winkler. Bill No. 246, for the relief of Sophie Piat-kowski Demyk.-Mr. Winkler.



Questions Bill No. 247, for the relief of Hilda Brooks Nangreaves.-Mr. Winkler-Bill No. 248, for the relief of Zemelia Katrina Ayoub MacDonald.-Mr. Winkler.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


NEW POST OFFICES IN NEWFOUNDLAND

PC

Mr. Browne (St. John's West):

Progressive Conservative

1. How many new post offices have been opened In Newfoundland since April 1, 1949?

2. Where are they located?

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LIB

Mr. Lapointe: (Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

1. One.

2. Shearstown: 2J miles west of Bay

Roberts, 21 miles north of Coley's Point, and 2\ miles south of Spaniard's Bay post offices.

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CHANDOS, ONT., RURAL MAIL SERVICE

May 29, 1950