May 24, 1950

FIELD MARSHAL SMUTS

TRIBUTES AND FELICITATIONS ON HIS EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY

PC

George Alexander Drew (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Progressive Conservative

Mr. George A. Drew (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, before proceeding with the business of the day, and on a matter of general privilege, I feel it would be appropriate to recognize the fact that today is not only the birthday of Queen Victoria, but it is also the birthday of the senior statesman of the British fellowship throughout the world. Today in South Africa Field Marshal Smuts is celebrating his eightieth birthday. It is appropriate that here in Canada we should indicate our own good wishes to a man who has contributed so much to the development of this great British association to which we belong; to a man who in his own life has given a remarkable demonstration of the way in which friendship may grow out of understanding, and, because of the genius of our system, those who have even been enemies can stand side by side in the great cause of freedom.

Field Marshal Smuts was actually in command of the Boer troops during a considerable period of the South African war. Shortly after that, when South Africa became associated with the rest of us in this common endeavour which is called the British empire, the British commonwealth, or by whatever other term one chooses to describe this really remarkable fellowship of free people, he showed the way in which the hand of friendship can be extended after hostilities have ceased. Surely there can be nothing more dramatic than the fact that one of the most gallant soldiers on the other side of the Boer war became the commander of the South African troops in the war of 1914-18, and again during the second world war was not only prime minister of South Africa but also the supreme commander of the South African troops.

Field Marshal Smuts has been a truly remarkable man, and his service has not by any means been confined to South Africa. Today, when thoughtful people everywhere are reaching out for a wider basis of understanding among the nations of the world, it 55946-177* * |

is interesting to recall that, out of his early experience, he has always sought the widest measure of understanding among nations. He is the only man in public life today who was an active representative of a government at the time the charter of the league of nations came into existence at Versailles in 1919. In the spring of 1945 he went to San Francisco with the experience of a man who had seen the dream of the league of nations emerge, and had seen that dream shattered. It was he who was largely responsible for the drafting of the opening paragraphs of the declaration of the United Nations. In that declaration he sought to overcome the weaknesses of the covenant of the league, which had failed to preserve peace.

Today this man, with eighty years behind him, still shows that out of all that experience he is building for the future. I feel sure that we in this House of Commons today, far separated in distance from South Africa, would wish to extend our best wishes for many happy returns to* this great citizen of the free fellowship to which we belong.

Topic:   FIELD MARSHAL SMUTS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES AND FELICITATIONS ON HIS EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY
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LIB

James Garfield Gardiner (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Right Hon. J. G. Gardiner (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I am sorry the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) is not here on this occasion, because I am sure he would have considered it a privilege to agree with what has been said by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew). Indeed, he probably would have taken it upon himself to express the congratulations which have been so well expressed by the leader of the opposition.

Since the Prime Minister is not here, however, I find myself in the position of speaking for the group who sit on this side of the house, and on the other side, nearest to you, Mr. Speaker, as well; and in doing so I want to join with the leader of the opposition in the expression of the points of view he has just stated. During the Boer war, General Smuts was one of the leaders who at that time opposed us, and after the war ended in peace he took a leading part in bringing together the peoples of the southern part of the African continent, in very much the same manner as the leaders on this continent had on a previous occasion brought together the two great races here. I have no doubt that had men such as Montcalm lived through the battles of those days and

2798 HOUSE OF

Felicitations to Field Marshal Smuts settled in this country, to carry on in relation to what has happened since they would have taken much the same position as General Smuts has taken in South Africa.

I would remind hon. members that when the terms of peace were being discussed and new organizations were being set up in South Africa to meet the new situation, Canada was copied perhaps to a greater extent than any other part of the British commonwealth. From that time until this, General Smuts has taken a great interest in what has been going on in this country, and in doing so has tended to bring our peoples closer and closer together. By applying the same practices and principles in the southern part of Africa as were followed here, he has done much in many parts of world to promote the interests of the commonwealth as they have been promoted here.

For these reasons it gives me great pleasure to join the leader of the opposition in extending congratulations to this grand old man who in his own country has seen so many of his efforts brought to fruition.

Topic:   FIELD MARSHAL SMUTS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES AND FELICITATIONS ON HIS EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. M. J. Coldwell (Roselown-Biggar):

Mr. Speaker, although the leader of the opposition (Mr. Drew) said he was speaking for the group with which he is associated, and the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Gardiner) said he was speaking for the party sitting on the government side, which has an overflow on this side, they really expressed the sentiment of all hon. members, no matter where they may sit in the house.

I have much pleasure in associating the members of the C.C.F. party with the felicitations extended to Field Marshal Smuts. I believe the story of the lives of Smuts and Botha, and some of their associates who were leaders of the Boer forces against the armies of the empire during the Boer war, indicates that they rendered notable service in promoting the welfare of this commonwealth of nations.

Our good wishes go out to Field Marshal Smuts today, particularly in view of the disturbed conditions that prevail in South Africa. The field marshal has taken a much more moderate attitude than some others do toward racial difficulties in that country; and I hope the day is not far distant when the people of South Africa will join with the other members of the commonwealth in banishing for ever the racial discrimination that now mars the good name of the Union of South Africa.

Topic:   FIELD MARSHAL SMUTS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES AND FELICITATIONS ON HIS EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY
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LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. Brooke Claxton (Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr Speaker, may I say in the first place that I understand the

[Mr. Gardiner.l

Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) has already sent a message to Field Marshal Smuts on the occasion of his eightieth birthday.

It so happens that in 1946, during the conference discussing the terms of peace with Italy and the other four satellites of Germany, it fell to my lot to tender a luncheon party to some of the leading figures at the conference. On that occasion the guest honoured by all was Field Marshal Smuts, the only man present who had been prominently associated with the Paris conference which concluded the first great war. The event took place in the room in the Crillon where Field Marshal Smuts had worked with President Wilson to draft the charter of the league of nations.

Topic:   FIELD MARSHAL SMUTS
Subtopic:   TRIBUTES AND FELICITATIONS ON HIS EIGHTIETH BIRTHDAY
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RED CROSS

DR. PAUL RUEGGER TRIBUTE TO WORK OF INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE

LIB

Brooke Claxton (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. Brooke Claxlon (Acting Secretary of State for External Affairs):

Mr. Speaker, by coincidence the house is privileged today to have among those who sit in the galleries one who represents another great work for humanity, Dr. Paul Ruegger, president of the International Red Cross. I should like again to express the appreciation every Canadian feels for the splendid work done by that great organization, particularly in respect of the 9,552 Canadian prisoners of war, for whose care and custody and welfare the international committee of the Red Cross in Geneva, and also, in its capacity of protecting power, the country of Switzerland, were responsible. They won and earned our admiration, our gratitude and our continuing support for what was done on behalf of humanity.

Topic:   RED CROSS
Subtopic:   DR. PAUL RUEGGER TRIBUTE TO WORK OF INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE
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OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT

PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS

LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Siuart S. Garson (Minister of Justice):

Yesterday the hon. member for Kamloops (Mr. Fulton) asked me a question in the following terms:

Has there been any examination or re-examination of the loyalty of any of the 150 persons then resident in Canada listed in the notebook found as a result of the espionage investigations of 1945 and 1946, since the trial ot Dr. Fuchs?

The notebook referred to in the hon. member's question was in fact a pocket address book, containing, as the question indicates, the names of 150 persons then resident in Canada. It formed only one item of many thousands of documents seized in the searches made in conjunction with the arrests of spy suspects in 1946. In this mass of material so seized there were many such notebooks; also desk calendars, memo pads, telephone finders, mailing lists, etc., which

contained thousands of names, addresses, telephone numbers and miscellaneous entries. All this material was carefully examined, including the notebook in question.

The list of 150 names referred to was carefully checked to ascertain which of these 150 names, if any, were those of persons who could be suspected of espionage or subversive activity. It was found that a limited number of the persons named belonged to either or both of these groups. In all such cases where positive identification proved possible, the entries were then related to and dealt with on the appropriate investigation files. As some of these investigations are still current, it will be appreciated that it would not be desirable to specify the number of persons identified.

The majority of the entries in this notebook, however, refer to professional people and others of good repute whose loyalty is beyond question.

All these investigation files have since remained extant. They, and the notebook in question, have been examined from time to time as a matter of security routine on every occasion, both before and after the trial of Dr. Fuchs, when information secured in other police investigations or from other sources indicated that such re-examination might contribute to and strengthen security measures.

On the orders of the day:

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS
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PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Gordon Graydon (Peel):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to direct a question to the Minister of Justice, arising out of the statement he made today about the espionage case. Without attempting to minimize the responsibility of the United Kingdom government with respect to the Fuchs case, I should like to ask the minister a question I directed to another minister in a committee but which did not wholly come within that minister's department. Does the minister know whether or not the person who had the notebook was carefully examined as to the qualifications and history of all the people mentioned therein? I mean the 436, not just the 150 who were Canadians. As I understand it, six were United Kingdom citizens.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS
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?

Some hon. Members:

Question.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS
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PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Graydon:

I am asking the minister the question. Was the man with the notebook examined as to the six United Kingdom citizens? It seems to me that only the names were forwarded, and not the result of the examination, if any.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS
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LIB

Stuart Sinclair Garson (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Stuart S. Garson (Minister of Justice):

Mr. Speaker, I think the hon. member was

Official Secrets Act

aware of the answer to the question while he was asking it. He wants to know whether I know anything about this matter, and he knows perfectly well that I do not. Not having had anything to do with the examination of the gentleman concerned, I could not possibly answer the question without consulting with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. I shall be glad to do that, taking my hon. friend's question as notice for that purpose, but without making any commitment about bringing down an answer.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS
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PC

Gordon Graydon

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Graydon:

I want an answer from somebody in the government.

Topic:   OFFICIAL SECRETS ACT
Subtopic:   PERSONS LISTED IN NOTEBOOK OF KLAUS FUCHS
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DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT

QUESTION AS TO MEETING OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO CONSIDER SUGGESTED AMENDMENTS


On the order for motions:


May 24, 1950