April 5, 1950

LIB

Elie Beauregard (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. Speaker:

In view of the fact that this is the last sitting day of the house before the Easter recess, if there are questions which might properly be asked on the orders of the day, perhaps it would be agreed that they be asked now.

Topic:   POSTAL SERVICE
Subtopic:   ACTION OF POST OFFICE DEPARTMENT IN DENIAL OF USE OF MAILS
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LABOUR CONDITIONS

FORD MOTOR COMPANY'


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Donald Ferguson Brown

Liberal

Mr. D. F. Brown (Essex West):

Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask a question of the Minister of Labour which is of vital interest not only to my constituency but to all of Canada. Is he aware of the impending industrial strike at the plant of the Ford Motor Company of Canada, Windsor, Ontario? If so, is his department proposing to take any action?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   FORD MOTOR COMPANY'
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to thank the hon. member for his question, and for having given notice of it. I am aware that there is a difficult situation in Windsor. But, as he will know, it comes under the jurisdiction of my good friend, Hon. Charles Daley, Minister of Labour for the province of Ontario.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   FORD MOTOR COMPANY'
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES
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?

An hon. Member:

Louder.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   FORD MOTOR COMPANY'
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. Mitchell:

The province of Ontario; you would not know where that was. We have just heard a voice from the wilderness. I hope that the representatives of the union and the company will find a way to harmonize their differences so that a strike will not take place, in view of the importance of the industry to a great city and to the nation. In any event I understand a conference is going on today between the two parties.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   FORD MOTOR COMPANY'
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES
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CCF

Major James William Coldwell

Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (C.C.F.)

Mr. Coldwell:

Does the minister's answer apply also to the question raised yesterday by the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre (Mr. Knowles) in connection with the railways?

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   FORD MOTOR COMPANY'
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES
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LIB

Humphrey Mitchell (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. Mitchell:

I would answer the hon. member exactly as I answered yesterday. Of course I am not on my feet as often as he is. Those who have any knowledge whatever of labour conditions in this country know that there is federal jurisdiction and provincial jurisdiction. There is such a thing as a conciliation board. Up to this time I have not received a report from the conciliation board

Inquiries of the Ministry set up in connection with the railway dispute, the chairman of which is Mr. Justice Wilson, of British Columbia, nor have I a report from the company and the employees.

Let me repeat what I said yesterday, that when delicate negotiations are taking place between employees and employers, and before a report is issued, this should be the last place on earth at such a time to ask a question, if we wish to have a satisfactory settlement. That is my considered opinion in the matter. I may be wrong, of course, but I have had a good deal of experience in these matters.

Topic:   LABOUR CONDITIONS
Subtopic:   FORD MOTOR COMPANY'
Sub-subtopic:   EMPLOYEES
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IMMIGRATION

INQUIRY AS TO DEPORTATION OF ENRIQUE MONTENEGRO AND ANGELO PARRA


On the orders of the day:


PC

Howard Charles Green

Progressive Conservative

Mr. Howard C. Green (Vancouver-Quadra):

Mr. Speaker, on March 14, in the absence of the Minister of Citizenship and Immigration, I directed a question to the Prime Minister (Mr. St. Laurent) concerning two young Spaniards named Enrique Montenegro and Angelo Parra who were about to be deported from Canada. The Prime Minister said that there would be further inquiry, and that a report would be made subsequently about these two lads. Is the minister in a position today to make a report as to what decision has been reached?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO DEPORTATION OF ENRIQUE MONTENEGRO AND ANGELO PARRA
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LIB

Walter Edward Harris (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration)

Liberal

Hon. W. E. Harris (Minister of Citizenship and Immigration):

After this matter was raised in the house by the hon. member for Vancouver-Quadra, several British Columbia members spoke to me about it, and for that reason we have made a complete investigation. I should like to report to the house that Montenegro and Parr# arrived at New Westminster, British Columbia, as stowaways on the British ship Alcyone Hope on July 10, 1949. On examination by the usual board of inquiry it appeared that Montenegro was a carpenter and Parra a seaman. They had stowed away on the S.S. Alcyone Hope, on which vessel they were working in Barcelona, Spain. They were not admissible to Canada, and were ordered deported. Early deportation was not effected because of a lack of transportation, and this was finally arranged in January last. Various statements have been made to the effect that they would suffer severe penalties if deported to Spain, as it was alleged that they were deserters from the Spanish navy.

These aliens furnished no information regarding naval service until questioned on arrival at Montreal on March 14 for deportation. In fact, Parra stated under examination by the board of inquiry last summer that he was too young for military service in

1564 HOUSE OF

Inquiries of the Ministry Spain. At Montreal they submitted a sworn statement that they were conscripted into the Spanish navy in 1948 and deserted from the warship Galicia at Barcelona on April 28, 1949. Official inquiries in Spain establish that the warship Galicia has not entered Barcelona in recent years, which fact casts serious doubt on the statements of these aliens regarding their status in Spain.

Representations that they wished to proceed to Guatemala and that visas were being obtained for that purpose were received by the department only on March 11 when the aliens were en route to Montreal. Proceedings were suspended to permit of further inquiries being made. The department has within the past few days received official information that visas have been granted by the consul general of Guatemala in Montreal. Montenegro and Parra will be allowed to effect departure from Canada to Guatemala as soon as their interested friends can arrange transportation.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   INQUIRY AS TO DEPORTATION OF ENRIQUE MONTENEGRO AND ANGELO PARRA
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POTATOES

GENEVA AGREEMENTS


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Clarence Decatur Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Right Hon. C. D. Howe (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

Mr. Speaker, before the orders of the day were called yesterday the hon. member for Victoria-Carleton (Mr. Hatfield), referring to a newspaper report, asked for information regarding the export of Canadian potatoes to the United States. The first question was: Is the report coming from Geneva correct that the contracting parties to the general agreement on tariffs and trade agreed to let the United States take measures to restrict the flow of imports of Canadian potatoes? The answer to that is no. That report does not give a correct picture of what took place. The general agreement on tariffs and trade negotiated at Geneva in 1947 contains, in schedule XX, United States concessions, certain tariff concessions under tariff paragraph 771 on table potatoes. This is a concession that was carried forward from the 1938 trade agreement between Canada and the United States. It provides, in addition to a fixed quota of one million bushels to be admitted at 371 cents per one hundred pounds, that if for any calendar year the production estimate made by the Department of Agriculture as of September 1 is less than 350 million bushels the concession of half rate of duty, 371 cents, will apply to that amount of potatoes that might be imported to make up the difference between the estimate and 350 million bushels. United States production

since 1938 has always been above 350 million bushels; hence this concession has never been applied in practice.

The rate of duty on seed potatoes is 371 cents per one hundred pounds for the first 21 million bushels imported in the twelve-month period beginning on September 15 in any year, and 75 cents per one hundred pounds on all seed potatoes above this quota.

The Canadian government was approached by the United States authorities with regard to the figure of 350 million bushels specified in the tariff on table potatoes. The latter anticipated possible difficulties in the next crop year arising from their acreage restriction policy and they therefore requested a modification of this particular clause.

Since Canada has not been shipping potatoes to the United States under this clause, and since the whole matter will be discussed at the coming tariff negotiations, Canada agreed for a one-year period commencing September 15 next to read the general agreement on tariffs and trade as if the figure 335 million bushels were substituted for 350 million bushels in paragraph 771 of schedule XX, such an agreement being without prejudice to the negotiations on potatoes to be undertaken at Torquay in September. This waiver was to be carried out under article XXV, paragraph 5 (a), of the general agreement.

This temporary adjustment was formalized by agreement of the contracting parties to the general agreement on tariffs and trade some days ago.

The second question was: Did Canada have a representative at the conference? The answer to that is yes. The third question was: Did Canada agree in advance? The answer to that is, yes.

Topic:   POTATOES
Subtopic:   GENEVA AGREEMENTS
Sub-subtopic:   REPORT AS TO RESTRIC- TION OF IMPORTS INTO THE UNITED STATES
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VACANCY

April 5, 1950